Advertisement

How much medication should I pack when traveling if I have diabetes?

If you are planning to travel and have diabetes, pack extra medications. Traveling for a week? Pack two weeks’ worth of your diabetes medications in case of travel delays or misplaced supplies.

Be sure to include everything you need, including insulin, syringes, testing strips, extra batteries for your pump, a first-aid kit and glucagon emergency kit. If you use an insulin pump, ask the company if you can bring a backup in case yours fails. Carry a prescription from your doctor for insulin or oral medication in case of an emergency.

Keep your medications and supplies close at hand and away from extreme temperatures—too hot or too cold. If you’re traveling by car, bus or train, don’t put them in the trunk or outer baggage compartment. You may need an insulated travel bag if you’ll be hiking or out in the elements. If you’re flying, put your supplies and medications in a carry-on, not in a checked bag, and keep them in the original packaging in a bag separate from your toiletries, as requested by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

Continue Learning about Living with Diabetes

How Do You Encourage Patients to Keep Their Diabetes Under Control?
How Do You Encourage Patients to Keep Their Diabetes Under Control?
Making lifestyle changes is an important part of managing diabetes. In this video, endocrinologist Jack Merendino, MD, explains how changing the way y...
Read More
Are foods high in corn syrup bad for diabetics?
MDLIVEMDLIVE
If the corn industry/lobbying groups that advertise on TV are to be believed, then "corn syrup vs. s...
More Answers
5 Ways to Protect Your Heart When You Have Diabetes
5 Ways to Protect Your Heart When You Have Diabetes5 Ways to Protect Your Heart When You Have Diabetes5 Ways to Protect Your Heart When You Have Diabetes5 Ways to Protect Your Heart When You Have Diabetes
Keep your heart healthy with these diabetes-friendly lifestyle changes.
Start Slideshow
Does Being Overweight Increase My Risk of Type 2 Diabetes?
Does Being Overweight Increase My Risk of Type 2 Diabetes?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.