Kidney Stones

Kidney Stones

Referred to as "silent stones," kidney stones often do not cause any symptoms. The first indication of a kidney stone is often a sudden feeling of extreme pain as the stone blocks the flow of urine. Kidney stones are one of the most painful urologic disorders and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. Most kidney stones - which are hardened masses that develop from crystals that separate from the urine in the urinary tract - are passed out of the body without surgical intervention by a doctor. A less common type of kidney stone, called a struvite or infection stone, is caused by infection in the urinary tract. Doctors are not always able to diagnose the cause of a kidney stone, which is why it's important to learn how to prevent them in the fist place. A person who has had a kidney stone in the past may likely form another one.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Kidney stones can be caused by conditions like short bowel syndrome, hyperparathyroidism, cancer, sarcoidosis, renal tubular acidosis, or vitamin D toxicity. If you have had gastric bypass surgery or other procedures that may affect your digestive system, you may be more prone to developing kidney stones. Talk with your doctor so you can manage your kidney stones in the context of your other issues.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    Renal colic is the name doctors use to describe the intense pain of a kidney stone passing through the urinary tract. Renal colic occurs in the lower back and lower abdomen and can sometimes radiate to the groin area. Stones cause renal colic as they move through the ureter. You might experience extreme waves of pain for an hour or more. Doctors may be able to provide pain relief.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Urology, answered
    Yes, kidney stones can occur in children. Although it is difficult to obtain an exact number, the incidence is increasing. Historically, kidney stones were considered an adult health problem. However, the current lifestyle of children places them at risk for kidney stones. Some of the risks are as follows:
    • Fast food diet (high in sodium)
    • Lack of water intake
    • Large consumption of sugar-filled drinks
    • Sedentary lifestyle (video game addict)
    • Obesity, alone or in combination with any of the above risks
    • Family history
    Prevention is the key:
    • Active lifestyle
    • Increase water intake
    • Prevent obesity
    A common misconception is that people with kidney stones should avoid calcium. In fact, dairy products have been shown to reduce the risk of stones, because the dietary calcium binds with oxalate before it is absorbed by the body, preventing it from getting into the kidneys.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Surgery, answered on behalf of
    A detailed evaluation in conjunction with pediatric nephrology (the study of kidneys) is necessary. Using shock wave lithotripsy or endoscopy the stone can be disintegrated without the need for surgical incisions. Less commonly, the stones need to be treated with open surgery.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Kidney stones usually affect people over the age of 40. Children who get kidney stones usually have a family member with the condition. Children can often pass larger stones (proportionate to their physical size) than adults. If a young child receives shock wave therapy to break up their stones, they can be sedated with general anesthesia. Children who have a kidney stone are highly likely to have stones in the future and should be treated with medication to limit the frequency of recurrence.

  • 3 Answers
    A
    A answered
    The most important way to prevent kidney stones is to stay hydrated by increasing your fluid intake. Water is the best drink for keeping your kidneys productive. Eating more citrus fruits high in natural citrate can lower kidney stone risks for some people. Other diet changes that can help include cutting back on animal protein, high-sodium foods, and sugary foods and drinks. If you’ve had kidney stones in the past, prescription medications such as thiazides or allopurinol may help prevent a recurrence.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Your doctor may recommend a computerized tomography (CT) scan to diagnose your kidney stones. Because this type of imaging involves exposing you to radiation, you should be aware of the risks involved. Patients who have many kidney stones may wish to limit the number of CT scans they get, however; other patients, including pregnant women, may wish to avoid them when possible. A CT scan can help your doctor identify your kidney stones and rule out other conditions that may be causing your pain. 
  • 4 Answers
    A
    To prevent more kidney stones, it's necessary to know what kind of stones you make. Most people make calcium stones, but there are different kinds of calcium stones. In fact, your body can produce about 16 different types of kidney stones. The first step is analyzing the stone. For your stone to be analyzed, you'll need to capture it when you urinate (unless your doctor took it out during a procedure). Your doctor will give you a strainer to urinate in, or you can urinate into a cup and filter your urine. Your doctor will send the stone to a lab to determine the chemicals in the stones.
    See All 4 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Urology, answered
    Kidney stones may not cause any symptoms (for example, pain). However, in the majority of situations, the first symptom of a kidney stone is extreme pain. This usually starts suddenly as the stones moves into an area of the kidney and blocks the flow of urine. The most common first site of blockage is the ureteropelvic junction (this is where the urinary collecting system forms a funnel shape). Sharp or cramping pain is typically experienced in the lower back with some radiation of pain around to the front of the body. If the stone is relatively small, then it may continue to pass into the ureter (small channel connecting the kidney to the urinary bladder). The pain may become dull or cramping and more localized to the front of the body in the lower quadrant. As the stone continues to move toward the urinary bladder, “shooting” pains may be felt in the scrotum (men) or labia (women) and associated with the following additional symptoms:
    • Frequency of urination
    • Urgency (perceived need to urinate, although the urinary bladder is relatively empty)
    • Dysuria (burning associated with urination)
    • Hematuria (blood in the urine)
    At any time during a kidney stone attack, nausea and vomiting may occur along with a loss of appetite. If the urine is infected, then a person may have a fever associated with chills. 
    The most common risk factor for kidney stone disease is dehydration (lack of water intake).
  • 1 Answer
    A

    If you experience severe pain in your lower back or side, discolored urine, nausea and vomiting, or fever and chills, you should call your doctor. You may need to have your doctor perform a procedure that will help your kidney stone pass out of your body. However, small stones should pass on their own without medical intervention.