Injuries, Wound and Trauma

Injuries, Wound and Trauma

Injuries, Wound and Trauma
The normal course of daily living ensures that at some point we will injure ourselves. The body is great at healing minor injuries, and first-aid basics will help keep injuries from becoming serious or infected. As we move up to more serious injuries, again knowing what to do first is important, even if follow-up care must be done by a medic or hospital emergency room. It's always better to prevent injury if you can. Pay attention to hazards that can cause falls. In the kitchen use cutting blocks and sharp knives - they are safer because you use less pressure while cutting.

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    Puncture wounds to the chest range from minor to life threatening. Stab and gunshot wounds are examples of puncture injuries. The penetrating object can injure any structure or organ within the chest, including the lungs.

    A puncture injury can allow air to enter the chest through the wound. Air in the chest cavity does not allow the lungs to function normally.

    Puncture wounds cause varying degrees of internal and external bleeding. A puncture wound to the chest is a life-threatening injury.
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    The types of heat illnesses are a continuum, just like in any disease process. At one end of the continuum are the very mild disorders. These include minor illnesses such as heat edema or leg swelling, which occur when you're out in the heat. Also included here is heat rash or prickly heat, which is well-known.

    Further in the continuum, much more severe illness from exposure to heat can occur, namely heat exhaustion. In the more severe heat illness, heatstroke, fatalities can arise from serious heat exhaustion.

    Trinity Health recognizes that people seek medical information on a variety of topics for a variety of reasons. Trinity Health does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. As a Catholic health care organization, Trinity Health acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition.

    Please note, the information contained on this website is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider if you have questions regarding your medical condition or before starting any new treatment. In the event of a medical emergency always call 911 or proceed to your nearest emergency care facility.
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    A Healthcare, answered on behalf of
    If you are a wounded veteran who is interested in trying a therapeutic recreation or adaptive sports program, you can find programs near your location by visiting www.challengeamerica.com. Challenge America helps connect injured military and their families with supportive programs in their communities.

    You can also ask a trusted advocate or medical professional at your local VA hospital, military hospital, or military installation to help you find recreation therapy programs near your home. Some of the individuals who may know about nearby programs include:
    • Army Wounded Warrior Advocates
    • Navy Safe Harbor Advocates
    • Recovery Care Coordinators
    • Physicians
    • Physical Therapists
    • Occupational Therapists
    • VA Representatives
    • Your peers -- If you ask around, you may hear about programs from other injured veterans who have tried them.
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    A answered
    Typical signs and symptoms that you or a loved one may be overheating include:
    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • abdominal cramping
    • confusion
    • dizziness
    • headache
    • muscle cramping
    • difficulty breathing
    • red-hot skin
    • loss of consciousness
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    A answered
    If you are living with serious illness or are simply planning ahead for your own or a loved one's future, having a frank discussion with your doctor is a good idea. Putting things into words, getting more information, and asking questions can help you get the kind of medical treatments you want.

    Here are some questions to ask your doctor about severe brain injuries:
    • What are the causes of severe brain injuries?
    • What is a coma?
    • If I or my loved one is in a coma, does that mean they are brain dead?
    • How is a coma treated?
    • How long does a coma last? Can my loved one ever recover from a coma?
    • What is brain death?
    • How can the doctors say my loved one is brain dead when I see them breathing and their heart is still beating?
    • Is there any treatment to reverse brain death? Who makes a decision to stop such treatments?
    • If the doctors determine that my loved one is in the vegetative state, what do they mean?
    • How long does the vegetative state last? Is there any treatment to reverse the vegetative state and make it go away?
    • The doctors say my loved one is in the minimally conscious state. What does that mean?
    • How do doctors know what type of brain problem my loved one has?
    • How do doctors know if there is any chance of recovery?
    • "Meaningful recovery" sounds like a loaded term. Who is to say what is "meaningful"?
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    Exertional heatstroke is a life-threatening condition during physical activity when the body's core temperature is 104 degrees Fahrenheit or more. The body is overwhelmed and has difficulty lowering its temperature. (This answer provided for NATA by the Weber State University Athletic Training Education Program.)
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    Symptoms of a brain injury may occur immediately and others may arise later. They include feeling light-headed or dizzy, blurred vision, headaches or ringing ears, fatigue, sensitivity to sound and light and impaired decision making. You may also have difficulty organizing tasks, memorizing and concentrating. Family or friends should observe for changes in your personality. Talk to your health care provider about any symptoms or problems.
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    The Amazing Brain: Physically Disabled
    Watch this video to learn more about how the brain can interact with computers to help rehabilitate those with brain injuries.


     
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    Arc Figure 7_26
    • In most cases, you can control bleeding by having the person sit with the head slightly forward while pinching the nostrils together for about 10 minutes.

    • If pinching the nostrils does not control the bleeding, other methods include applying an ice pack to the bridge of the nose or putting pressure on the upper lip just beneath the nose.
    • Remember, ice should not be applied directly to the skin since it can damage the skin tissue. Place a cloth between the ice and the skin.
    • Seek medical attention if the bleeding persists or recurs, or if the person says that it is caused by high blood pressure.

    Arc Figure 7_26
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    Nose injuries usually are caused by a blow from a blunt object, often resulting in a nosebleed. High blood pressure or changes in altitude also can cause nosebleeds.