How to Prepare for Exercise

How to Prepare for Exercise

How to Prepare for Exercise

Before you start an exercise regimen, it is important to consult a healthcare provider to ensure you do not have any conditions that may be hampered by exercise. If all is a go – read up on fitness tip, choose an activity, establish a routine and welcome the rewards!

Recently Answered

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Physical Therapy, answered
    The rotator cuff is a group of small muscles which are important to stabilize the shoulder during activity. They are especially important in overhead activities such as a throw, a tennis serve, or even swimming. Their job is made harder by the forward head and shoulder posture many of us acquire. During activity, they mostly work to keep the joint in the right place and then slow down the arm on follow through. If you are warming up on the field or at the court, first increase blood flow to the shoulders in general with jogging to include arm swings, circles, and hugs. Then 1-2 stretches such as pulling the elbow across in front of the body, or reaching up behind your back will ensure that there is enough range of motion for the rotator cuff to work through. Finally, perform a motion similar to the one you are warming up for in a slow and progressive manner over 15-20 repetitions. Use a gradually increasing intensity until you are up to game speed. If you are having pain or difficulty getting loose after a routine such as this you might need individualized assessment by a sports medicine professional, due to the complex workings of the shoulder and rotator cuff.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 4 Answers
    A

    You should do a total body warm up on a non weight bearing machine (such as a dual arm action exercise stationary bike) for a period of 5 to 10 minutes before any stretching or exercising.  A total body warm up can increase your body elasticity by 20% and get your synovial fluid going in the joints which will help with pain and stiffness.  A better indication to know when you're properly warmed up and ready for stretching and exercising is when you notice sweat/moisture appearing on your forehead, back of hands, or under the nose. 

    With continuing pain you should see your medical provider.  Also meeting with a NASM certified personal trainer for dynamic postural assessments, and basic performance assessments is recommended before exercising.

    Dynamic postural assessments observe your basic body movements, how your muscles and joints work together, and look for any imbalances or dysfunctions in your posture alignment that can be corrected.  Poor posture, dysfunctions, and muscles imbalances, may be leading to your pain and discomfort. 

    See All 4 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A

    Before starting an exercise program, there are several things that you should possibly consider. If you have never exercised, it’s been a long time, or you’re over the age of 40, a thorough physical by your primary medical provider is strongly advised to make sure that you are physically ready to participate in regular exercise. Beyond that it’s important to consider why you’re beginning an exercise program, what your eventual goals are, and what possible obstacles, there might be to you continuing your exercise program and how best to overcome these obstacles. If you have clearly defined and manageable goals it makes it more likely you will stick with your exercise program and be motivated to continue to reach manageable goals.  

    See All 3 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Begin in a push-up position. Slowly walk your legs toward your hands moving yourself into  a pike position, your heels may be off the floor but try to push them into the floor as the range of motion improves. Continue walking forward until you start to feel a stretch in your hamstrings.  At this point, slowly walk your arms forward with your feet still, until you are back in the push-up position. Repeat this inching along five to ten times.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Orthopedic Surgery, answered
    To limber up your foot before attempting other exercises, try this:
    1. Sit in a chair with your feet flat on the floor.
    2. Lift your left leg so your foot is off the floor and use your big toe to make circles in the air, moving in a clockwise direction, for 15 to 20 rotations.
    3. Reverse direction and make another 15 to 20 circles, this time in a counterclockwise direction.
    4. Repeat with your right foot.
  • 3 Answers
    A
    Actually when it comes to stretching you want to do it before and after you exercise.  Before you workout you want to stretch your muscles along with using a foam roller to help release some of those tight areas.  Then after your workout you will want to do the same stretching and foam rolling routine as latic acid has built up along with muscles becoming tight again because of your workout. 
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Your family doctor can be an excellent starting point for beginning an exercise program. Doctors who specialize in family medicine typically offer a broad range of knowledge about general medicine, including strategies for healthier living such as exercising and eating a nutritious diet.
    Through a physical exam, your doctor can make sure that you are healthy enough to exercise, then may be able to recommend types of exercise and ways to do them safely to achieve your health goals.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    First make sure your calves are properly stretched and ready then simply start skipping. Begin with low impact small skips and gradually work up to large bounding explosive skipping. Pick an area that is unobstructed that allows you to skip for approximately 20 yards. Begin with the small skips and gradually progress to larger and more explosive skips. Perform 2-3 passes of 20 yards in length.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 4 Answers
    A

    Warming up prior to exercise is extremely important to avoid injury.  Having an injury occur is never a pleasant experience and one that you want to avoid.  In addition, you will be able to benefit more from warming up prior to exercise.  Reasoning for more benefit included changes for increase strength and/or increased calories burned.  This occurs due to your body being properly ready for the activity in which you are about to start.

    See All 4 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A

    "Remember to stretch your tight muscles as you prepare to exercise. Evidence shows that static stretching can, and should, be used to restore your muscles to their optimal length, helping to improve postural alignment as well as muscle function during activity. After stretching, perform a few activation and integration exercises for the muscles you just stretched so the muscles and joints are ready to operate within their newly established range of motion. This will ultimately improve your overall movement patterns, decrease the stress placed on your body, and reduce your risk of injury. It is also very important to equip yourself with adequate means of hydration since a body fluid loss of just a few percent can cause a decrease in your performance and add to feelings of fatigue."