Heart Health

Heart Health

Heart Health
Treat your heart right by eating healthy, staying active and managing your stress. Although some heart conditions are heredity, you can reduce your risk by keeping your cholesterol and blood pressure at healthy levels, avoiding tobacco products and losing some pounds if you are obese or overweight. A diet high in fiber, veggies and fruits is essential for a healthy heart. Vitamins and supplements, such as fish oil, may help reduce your cholesterol, which if too high can cause blockage in your arteries and lead to a heart attack. If you arteries are blocked, you may need a stent or cardiac angioplasty device to open your blood vessels, which can help prevent a heart attack. Because heart disease is the number one killer of adults in the U.S., taking care of your heart is essential for a long life. If you have a family history of heart disease, it is especially important for you to manage your hearts health.

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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    A heart-healthy lifestyle includes exercise, good nutrition and other attributes, according to the American Heart Association. But what effect does a heart-healthy lifestyle have on total health? A study found that there is a clear link between ideal cardiovascular health metrics and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and other conditions, such as cancer and depression. Considering the strong association of cardiovascular health metrics with both cardiovascular disease and noncardiovascular disease outcomes, a coordinated global effort for improving cardiovascular health should be considered a priority.
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    We all have unexciting days sometimes. But, hey, having a boring day beats having a really bad one, right?

    Not so fast. Seems that "ho hum" might be right up there with "woe is me" when it comes to the impact on your health. In a study, people who were most bored with their jobs had higher mortality rates at younger ages. Yikes. Time to spice things up with some boredom busters!

    The study included a survey of more than 7,000 government workers in London in the 1980s, asking them how often they found themselves bored on the job. After a little more than 20 years had passed, the researchers checked back in with the participants and found that those who had been most bored with their jobs were more likely to have died in the interim. And the killer? More often than not, it was due to heart troubles.

    Boredom itself wasn't the actual cause of death, but researchers noticed that the people who were most bored also exercised less and had worse overall health, leading the researchers to speculate that depression could be at play. So, combating boredom could also result in depression help. Feeling chronically uninterested in things can be a sign of depression, and depressed people are less likely to feel motivated to take care of themselves.

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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    The target numbers for a healthy heart are as follows:
    • Blood pressure should typically be less than 120 systolic and less than 80 diastolic for an adult age 20 or over.
    • A total cholesterol score of less than 180 mg/dL is considered optimal.
    • A BMI range of 18.5 to 24.9 and a waistline smaller than 35 inches is considered healthy.
    • A normal blood sugar level is less than 100 mg/dL after fasting, and less than 140 mg/dL two hours after eating.
    When measuring these key indicators, be aware of where you stand -- and also pay attention to where you are going. If your numbers are high, but trending down with each check, that’s a sign you’re on the right path to a healthier heart.

    This content originally appeared on http://www.livehealthyaustin.com/
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    To better gauge your heart health, your doctor will likely ask you lifestyle questions regarding diet, exercise, smoking and family history of heart diseases (including heart attack in first degree relatives). Your doctor may also ask about any early age of death in parents or siblings.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Robin Miller - americans following AHA guidelines
    The American Heart Association has seven recommendations for a healthy heart. In this video, Dr. Robin Miller discusses how Americans are sizing up to these recommendations.


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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Lexiscan is a medicine that is used during a nuclear heart stress test to dilate, or open up, the arteries. All normal arteries are able to do that. But if you have a blocked artery, it cannot dilate. When doctors order cardiac imaging tests, they are looking for the relative lack of blood flow. They compare normal to abnormal. If all the arteries are normal, that’s good. But if there’s one artery that’s blocked, Lexiscan allows them to see a difference between that artery and the normal arteries.
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    To surgically correct decreased blood flow through an artery, doctors place a bypass graft made of synthetic material or a natural vein taken from another part of the body. During the procedure, the surgeon will make an incision to expose the diseased segment of the artery, and then attach one end of a bypass graft to a point above the blockage and the other end to a point below it. The blood supply is then diverted through the graft, around the blockage, to bypass the diseased section of the artery. The diseased artery is left in place.

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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Everybody should monitor their heart health, regardless of gender. In the US [heart disease] is the number one cause of death. If you ask women what the number one cause of death is, many women still believe they’re going to die of breast cancer.
     
    Heart disease symptoms in women can be different than symptoms in men, so they aren’t looking for the kind of symptoms that can represent heart disease. The number one symptom for heart disease in women is shortness of breath -- not pain. Having low energy is also a common symptom. However, more than half of people -- men and women -- simply don’t have symptoms that alert them to a heart attack or heart disease.

    Trinity Health recognizes that people seek medical information on a variety of topics for a variety of reasons. Trinity Health does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. As a Catholic health care organization, Trinity Health acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition.
     

    Please note, the information contained on this website is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider if you have questions regarding your medical condition or before starting any new treatment. In the event of a medical emergency always call 911 or proceed to your nearest emergency care facility.
     
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    You could have the lowest rate of heart disease of your whole lunch bunch if you choose this for your midday meal: spinach salad with an olive-oil-based dressing.

    In a study of healthy women, those who tended to eat lots of leafy greens topped with olive oil had as much as a 45% lower risk of heart disease compared with their salad-eschewing peers.

    Researchers examined the women's food choices over an eight-year period and compared their choices with their risk of developing heart disease and found that certain foods seemed to buoy heart health. The women who consumed at least two cups of leafy greens or two and a half tablespoons of olive oil each day had the lowest heart disease rates of all -- most likely thanks to the B vitamins, healthy fats, and antioxidant vitamins like C, E and beta carotene in these nutrition superstars.

    Nutrients in leafy greens and olive oil may help with everything from lowering signs of heart-harming inflammation to preventing plaque buildup in the arteries and guarding against the oxidative damage that contributes to heart disease. Olive oil and leafy greens aren't the only way to a healthy heart. In the recent study, cabbage and raw tomatoes also were associated with lower rates of heart disease. And, in general, fresh vegetables can do wonders for your heart and overall health. So don't be conservative at the salad bar. The more vegetable variety, the better.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Like they say in Vegas, it's all about the odds. When you take 162.5 mg or greater of aspirin, you reduce your arterial aging by 36 percent. With 82 mg, the reduction is 13 percent. Since the side effects are just a little greater with 162 mg, the benefit of taking 162 mg is far greater-with a little increase in risk. Las Vegas won't give you such odds without paying a much greater price. For aspirin, the bump up is great for the "increased risk." We'll take those odds every time.
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