Heart Health

Heart Health

Heart Health
Treat your heart right by eating healthy, staying active and managing your stress. Although some heart conditions are heredity, you can reduce your risk by keeping your cholesterol and blood pressure at healthy levels, avoiding tobacco products and losing some pounds if you are obese or overweight. A diet high in fiber, veggies and fruits is essential for a healthy heart. Vitamins and supplements, such as fish oil, may help reduce your cholesterol, which if too high can cause blockage in your arteries and lead to a heart attack. If you arteries are blocked, you may need a stent or cardiac angioplasty device to open your blood vessels, which can help prevent a heart attack. Because heart disease is the number one killer of adults in the U.S., taking care of your heart is essential for a long life. If you have a family history of heart disease, it is especially important for you to manage your hearts health.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Robin Miller - stem cells and heart damage

    A new study reveals that doctors were able to repair damaged heart muscle with the use of a cutting-edge medical therapy. In this video, Dr. Robin Miller explains what doctors did, and how dramatic the results were.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    How is high-intensity interval training beneficial for heart health?
    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) can be more beneficial for heart health than sustained exercise. In this video, cardiologist Suzanne Steinbaum, DO, discusses how HIIT works, and why it can be a great option for a strong, healthy heart.
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    A , Health Education, answered
    One of the best ways to judge a prospective doctor’s quality is through the recommendation from another doctor. Most doctors are sincerely interested in the well-being of their patients and refer them to the doctors they believe offer the best care.

    If you are asking a medical professional why he or she is recommending a doctor, listen for an answer that includes how impressive this specialist is in the field of cardiac research or surgery. Key phrases are “participated in clinical trials” and “presented papers at professional conferences.” These are extra-effort activities that earn respect among medical peers. But don’t stop there; listen for clues about this prospective doctor’s bedside manners as well as his superstar performance at last year’s medical conference. However, as Phoenix cardiologist Dr. Rebecca Allison notes, “Some doctors who don’t do research are still very good doctors.”

    Don’t assume that someone is a good cardiologist or surgeon just because your primary care doctor has referred you to him. Sometimes doctors fall into referral patterns of always recommending the same doctor down the hallway or a former college roommate. While this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it helps if you know this piece of background information.

    If you are talking with other patients or friends, a good follow-up question is, “How did you originally find this doctor?” For example, if the person found this specialist without doing her homework, or even worse, from the Yellow Pages, take this person’s diminished credibility into account.

    If you are asking a medical professional, you want to hear that this person has worked closely with the recommended doctor for a number of years. If you are seeking a second opinion, the doctors may not know each other as well, so listen for clues about the prospective doctor’s reputation.

    Depending on the referrer’s degree of openness and willingness to talk, you may get all the details you need by simply asking how satisfied she is. Be sure to press gently for details on the areas that need improvement. Everyone has shortcomings. Use this question to decide if you can live with this doctor’s particular deficiencies or quirks.
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    A resting radionuclide angiogram (RNA) is a type of nuclear medicine procedure that evaluates the heart's chambers in motion. The amount of the radionuclide (radioactive tracer) injected into your vein for the procedure is small enough that there is no need for precautions against radioactive exposure. The injection of the radionuclide may cause some sight discomfort. Allergic reactions to the radionuclide are rare.

    If you are pregnant or suspect that you may be pregnant, you should notify your physician due to the risk of injury to the fetus from radionuclide angiography. Radiation exposure during pregnancy may lead to birth defects. If you are lactating or breastfeeding, you should notify your physician due to the risk of contaminating breast milk with the radionuclide.

    Patients who are allergic to or sensitive to medications, contrast dyes, iodine, or latex should notify their physician. There may be other risks depending upon your specific medical condition. Be sure to discuss any concerns with your physician prior to the procedure. Nicotine in cigarettes may cause spasm in the coronary arteries, which could affect the test results.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Almonds can help your heart. Almonds are high in Vitamin E, calcium, iron, riboflavin and fiber. They are also high in magnesium. Both magnesium and Vitamin E are necessary for proper heart function. The fiber in almonds is also important in keeping cholesterol levels normal. Almonds have the highest amounts of fiber of any nut. They supply 3 grams of fiber per ounce.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Lexiscan is a medicine that is used during a nuclear heart stress test to dilate, or open up, the arteries. All normal arteries are able to do that. But if you have a blocked artery, it cannot dilate. When doctors order cardiac imaging tests, they are looking for the relative lack of blood flow. They compare normal to abnormal. If all the arteries are normal, that’s good. But if there’s one artery that’s blocked, Lexiscan allows them to see a difference between that artery and the normal arteries.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    A heart-healthy lifestyle includes exercise, good nutrition and other attributes, according to the American Heart Association. But what effect does a heart-healthy lifestyle have on total health? A study found that there is a clear link between ideal cardiovascular health metrics and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and other conditions, such as cancer and depression. Considering the strong association of cardiovascular health metrics with both cardiovascular disease and noncardiovascular disease outcomes, a coordinated global effort for improving cardiovascular health should be considered a priority.
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    If you are often angry, your health may be paying consequences you aren’t aware of. Studies have shown that people who are angry more frequently and more intensely are at higher risk for all heart disease events, including heart attack, silent heart attack, and a need for bypass surgery. They are also more likely to die suddenly from a heart-related event. 
    Men and people with a “type A” personality are especially at risk. Men are more likely than women to act out their anger when stressed. This may be due to cultural factors and perhaps feeling frustrated that they can’t fix certain situations. In particular, young men who frequently become angry under stress have an increased risk of developing heart disease before the age of 55 (known as “premature heart disease”) and having a heart attack.
    Both men and women may exhibit the traits characteristic of a “type A” personality, which is typically described as a go-getting, stressed, short-fused perfectionist. While “type A” personality trait has also been associated with an increased heart disease risk, the latest evidence suggests it is most likely anger or hostility that is responsible for the increased risk of heart disease in this group of people. This is encouraging because while it is difficult to change some personality traits, it is possible to address anger and manage stress so it doesn’t overwhelm you.
    If you find you are often angry, seeking out strategies for managing this emotion can bring you a happier day-to-day life and a lower risk of heart disease. Your doctor, therapist, or other qualified medical professional can help you identify techniques for managing your anger that work for you.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Everybody should monitor their heart health, regardless of gender. In the US [heart disease] is the number one cause of death. If you ask women what the number one cause of death is, many women still believe they’re going to die of breast cancer.
     
    Heart disease symptoms in women can be different than symptoms in men, so they aren’t looking for the kind of symptoms that can represent heart disease. The number one symptom for heart disease in women is shortness of breath -- not pain. Having low energy is also a common symptom. However, more than half of people -- men and women -- simply don’t have symptoms that alert them to a heart attack or heart disease.

    Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider.
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    The first order of business for patients with hemorrhagic shock is the replacement of blood. Some secondary medications can be involved in the treatment. If the patient is suffering, doctors may prescribe a painkiller like morphine to diminish their pain. Under some circumstances, vasopressin can be used to limit internal hemorrhaging, although this treatment is risky because of potential effects on the heart. Somatostatin and octreotide can sometimes succeed in reducing gastrointestinal hemorrhaging. Finally, stimulants such as dopamine and epinephrine may be used to increase heart rate.