Health Value Of Foods

Health Value Of Foods

Health Value Of Foods
A healthy diet is rich in foods with high nutritional value, providing your body with the vitamins, minerals and other food nutrients it needs to protect against disease and maintain a healthy weight. To identify healthy foods, it's important to read nutrition labels and know the source of your food. Products advertised as whole-grain, organic or fortified may not necessarily be healthy for you. Find out how to get the most health value from various fruits, nuts, spices, oils and vegetables -- and learn which types of red meat and processed foods to avoid -- with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    How can I tell how much a serving of nuts is, so I don't eat too many?
    Nuts are a healthy snack, but it can be hard to tell how many nuts are in a serving, since they're all different sizes. In this video, dietitian Ashley Koff, RD, shares her simple tip for how to measure a serving of nuts, so you don't eat too many.
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    Greek yogurt is often preferred by weight-loss patients due to its traditionally lower carbohydrate and sugar content. It also boasts higher, often double, protein content over non-Greek yogurt. Additionally, Greek yogurt is lower in lactose content than traditional yogurt, therein making it a more digestive-friendly option for some. However, careful label observation is still required. You may have noticed Greek yogurts with caramel, chocolate or honey added. These varieties may contain as much carbohydrate and sugar as a standard yogurt. Also, for the calcium conscious, a traditional non-Greek yogurt often contains 20 to 30% of the dietary reference intake (DRI) for calcium. This is roughly 200-300 mg of calcium per six ounces. Greek yogurt typically contains a slightly lower amount at 15% of the DRI, or 150 mgs per six ounce serving.

    Is it right for you? Well, for many, taste buds will be the deciding factor. For those who enjoy it, Greek yogurt can be a nice, protein-rich addition to their day.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Is it possible to eat too many vegetables?
    It's pretty much impossible to eat too many vegetables, but moderation is always key. In this video, Crystal Robertson, a registered dietitian at Riverside Community Hospital, says that keeping a broad spectrum of healthy foods is the goal.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    What are the health benefits of eating kohlrabi?
    Kohlrabi is part of the turnip family; it's a root-looking vegetable that has leafy stems and a myriad of health benefits. In this video, nutrition expert Brooke Alpert, RD, discusses the many ways you can prepare kohlrabi, and what it tastes like. 
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    There are certain health benefits of eating wheat, barley and rye. They act as prebiotics, which means that it is fuel for the healthy bacteria that live in our gut. It helps these bacteria to proliferate and create good digestive health. They are very high in fiber and helps to lower cholesterol. It also helps to stabilize blood sugar. When used in its whole, unprocessed form, it is a very healthy food.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Sharon Richter - What are the health benefits of red bell peppers?
    Red bell peppers have lycopene (which protects our skin from the sun), as well as vitamins C and A. In this video, registered dietician Sharon Richter, RD, explains the benefits of red bell peppers, and how to get the most nutrients from them.
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    Evidence shows that eating whole grains can benefit your brain. Do you ever notice that when you haven’t eaten carbohydrates in a while you have trouble concentrating? That’s because the brain relies on glucose, the simple form of sugar that circulates in the bloodstream, for energy. Since the brain can’t store glucose, it needs a steady supply of it to function at its best.

    Whole grains, as well as other fiber-rich complex starches like beans, fruit and vegetables, digest more slowly than refined carbohydrates, providing a steady, gradual release of glucose. As a bonus, whole grains are also linked to reduced risk for heart disease.

    Be sure to choose “whole grains” and read the label -- something can be “made with whole grains” but actually contain mostly refined grains. Multigrain can also be confusing; it means “made with lots of different grains” and doesn’t necessarily mean they are all whole grains.
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    Berries are not just a delicious summer treat, they can also benefit your brain by helping to keep your mind sharp. Berries contain flavonoids, which are compounds produced by plants that are associated with antioxidant properties and a number of health benefits.

    Flavonoids, including anthocyanin found in red, purple and blue fruits, have been linked to better memory and delay of age-related brain decline. A study involving more than 16,000 people found that intake of blueberries and strawberries could delay cognitive decline by as much as a two and a half years. Animal studies have also shown that the flavonoids found in fruit can boost memory.

    In addition to flavonoids, blueberries are also a good source of vitamin C and dietary fiber.
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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    To nourish your eyes, follow Popeye’s lead. Spinach (like other green foods) is full of lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants that protect your retina from the macular degeneration that comes with age. Lutein has also been found to help reduce risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. A good rule of thumb: The darker the vegetable's color, the higher the lutein content.

    Don’t forget: Fat increases lutein absorption, so remember to sauté your spinach and other greens in a little olive oil. Other lutein and zeaxanthin vegetables include kale, turnip greens, collards, mustard greens, squash, green peas and broccoli.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.
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    In an effort to cut down on unhealthy saturated fats, most food experts suggest limiting red meat consumption and choosing the leanest cuts when possible. Even white meats, such as turkey and chicken, have saturated fat, especially if you eat the skin. If you're interested in adding more plant-based proteins to your diet in place of meat, you have plenty of choices. Along with nuts, seeds, legumes and beans, here are a few to consider:
    • Peas: one cup of peas contains about 9 grams of protein.
    • Hemp seeds: one ounce has about 10 grams of protein. It pairs well with Greek yogurt, which is also protein-packed.
    • Broccoli: one cup, cooked, has about 7 grams of protein.
    • Lentils:  one cup cooked has 18 grams of protein
    • Quinoa: one cup cooked has 9 grams of protein
    Note that most health professionals recommend that you get 35% of your daily calories from protein. That translates into 46 grams for the average woman and 52 grams for the average man.
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