Health Value Of Foods

Health Value Of Foods

Health Value Of Foods
A healthy diet is rich in foods with high nutritional value, providing your body with the vitamins, minerals and other food nutrients it needs to protect against disease and maintain a healthy weight. To identify healthy foods, it's important to read nutrition labels and know the source of your food. Products advertised as whole-grain, organic or fortified may not necessarily be healthy for you. Find out how to get the most health value from various fruits, nuts, spices, oils and vegetables -- and learn which types of red meat and processed foods to avoid -- with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    How can I tell how much a serving of nuts is, so I don't eat too many?
    Nuts are a healthy snack, but it can be hard to tell how many nuts are in a serving, since they're all different sizes. In this video, dietitian Ashley Koff, RD, shares her simple tip for how to measure a serving of nuts, so you don't eat too many.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Is it possible to eat too many vegetables?
    It's pretty much impossible to eat too many vegetables, but moderation is always key. In this video, Crystal Robertson, a registered dietitian at Riverside Community Hospital, says that keeping a broad spectrum of healthy foods is the goal.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Sharon Richter - What are the health benefits of red bell peppers?
    Red bell peppers have lycopene (which protects our skin from the sun), as well as vitamins C and A. In this video, registered dietician Sharon Richter, RD, explains the benefits of red bell peppers, and how to get the most nutrients from them.
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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    To nourish your eyes, follow Popeye’s lead. Spinach (like other green foods) is full of lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants that protect your retina from the macular degeneration that comes with age. Lutein has also been found to help reduce risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. A good rule of thumb: The darker the vegetable's color, the higher the lutein content.

    Don’t forget: Fat increases lutein absorption, so remember to sauté your spinach and other greens in a little olive oil. Other lutein and zeaxanthin vegetables include kale, turnip greens, collards, mustard greens, squash, green peas and broccoli.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.
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    American children and adults alike enjoy snack bars, which are often advertised as “health” or “quick burst of energy” foods. Snack and energy bars are a surprising source of added nutrients that can be excessive for children younger than age 8, for pregnant women and for older adults, particularly post-menopausal women. A review of 1,025 snack and energy bars determined that 27 contained 50% or more of the adult daily value of preformed vitamin A, zinc and/or niacin in a single serving
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    What are the health benefits of cremini mushrooms?
    Cremini mushrooms have been used for centuries to boost immunity and fight off colds. In this video, naturopathic specialist Pina LoGiudice, ND, explains the healthy benefits of cremini mushrooms, how to find them, and how to cook with them.
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    You’ve probably heard about quinoa, an ancient grain that is high in protein; another grain called kaniwa is now beginning to grow in popularity. Sourced from South America, this grain is high in protein, gluten-free and an excellent source of iron. It looks a bit like red quinoa, but kaniwa grains are smaller. It’s a versatile grain that can be used in breakfast cereal (added to traditional oatmeal) or in salads.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Some research results support the conclusion that eating chocolate may be healthy for your skin and may even protect it from ultraviolet (UV) damage from the sun. According to these data, this can decrease the probability that you will get sunburn.

    In a London study, researchers gave chocolate to two groups for 12 weeks. One of those groups received a “high flavanol” chocolate, such as you might get with a high-cocoa dark chocolate. The second received a “low flavanol” chocolate, such as you might get with low-cocoa milk chocolate. After 12 weeks, they tested the skin of these participants with a challenge of UV light to see whether there was a change over time. Because one group had high-cocoa and the other did not, this allowed them to see if the cocoa played any role in the protection of the skin from erythema (sunburn).

    Over the 12-week span, the skin of those who ate low-flavanol chocolate was no more or less protected from UV rays. However, those who ate the high-flavanols chocolate could receive double the amount of UV light on their skin before burning. In other words, after less than two weeks of eating high-flavanol chocolate, subjects’ skin was protected from burning even at twice the UV level.

    One plausible explanation for this effect may be the fact that high-cocoa chocolate can increase blood circulation to the skin itself. Increased blood flow to the topmost layers of the skin (those within only one millimeter of the surface) has been shown in women who consume high-flavanol chocolate beverages. These added blood vessels can provide the healthy oxygenation your skin needs to help protect itself.
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    According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, there is not enough evidence to evaluate the effect of coconut oil on hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol), diabetes, chronic fatigue, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome or thyroid conditions, to name a few. Many claims about the benefits of coconut oil cite cultures, such as certain Polynesian groups, whose diets include large amounts of coconut oil and who are generally free of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. However, these populations also tend to be very physically active, consume diets low in refined sugar and processed foods, eat more fiber and omega-3 fats and use little tobacco, making them a poor comparison to Western cultures.
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    Evidence suggests that coconut oil may be beneficial for cholesterol levels and heart health. Studies have shown it can lower, raise or have no effect on total cholesterol levels, with results depending on the person. In fact, it does not raise LDL cholesterol (the “bad cholesterol”) but instead raises HDL cholesterol (the “good cholesterol”), creating a more balanced cholesterol makeup, which would be beneficial for heart health.