Healthcare Basics
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Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts

How much do you know about donating blood or the different types of organ donations? Test your knowledge with our quiz.

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Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 1 of 20 Correct

How many people need to donate blood in the U.S. each year to meet the nation's need?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: To meet our nation's need, the American Red Cross must collect over 6 million blood donations each year. To find out where you can give blood through the Red Cross near you, go to redcrossblood.org, or call 1-800-RED-CROSS.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 2 of 20 Correct

True or false: If you have blood type AB, you can accept a blood donation from anyone.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. People with blood type AB can accept blood from all donors and are called universal recipients. People with type A or B can receive matching blood or type O blood. People with blood type O can donate blood to anyone and are called universal donors.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 3 of 20 Correct

True or false: Teenagers can donate blood.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. In most states, donors must be age 17 or older. Some states allow donation by 16 year olds with parental consent. Donors must weigh at least 110 pounds, be in good health and not be at risk for HIV/AIDS or hepatitis.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 4 of 20 Correct

True or false: You should not donate blood if you have low blood pressure.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. If you have low blood pressure, you may donate blood as long as you feel well at the time of donation. If your blood pressure normally runs low, it may be more difficult for your body to adjust to the volume loss following donation, especially if you are dehydrated. Drinking extra water before and after donation is important.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 5 of 20 Correct

How often can someone donate blood?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: You must wait at least 8 weeks (56 days) between donations of whole blood.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 6 of 20 Correct

True or false: You can donate blood to yourself.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Using your own blood, called autologous donation, is a transfusion option for patients who are having surgery. You can donate one or more units of your own blood up to six weeks before your surgery if necessary.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 7 of 20 Correct

True or false: Medications can prevent you from donating blood.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. While in most cases, medications will not disqualify you as a blood donor, there are a handful of drugs that are of special significance in blood donation. People on these drugs have waiting periods following their last dose before they can donate blood.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 8 of 20 Correct

True or false: You can donate blood if you have an STD.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. You may donate blood if you have chlamydia, venereal warts (human papilloma virus) or genital herpes and you are feeling healthy and well and meet all other eligibility requirements. However, you must wait 12 months after treatment for syphilis or gonorrhea before you are eligible to donate blood.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 9 of 20 Correct

What are the chances that you could get HIV from donated blood?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: According to the latest medical research, the chance of receiving an HIV-infected transfusion is estimated to be about 1 in 2,000,000 or less. The Red Cross performs laboratory tests on blood products to qualify the products for transfusion and to protect the safety of the transfusion recipients. The very low risk of infection exists during what is called the "window period," which is the time between when a donor would be infected with HIV and when the test would detect the presence of the virus or antibodies to the virus.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 10 of 20 Correct

True or false: You should wait 30 days before donating blood after having a flu shot.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. While there are some vaccinations that require a waiting period before donating blood (best to check with your doctor), you don't need to wait for influenza, tetanus, HPV or meningitis vaccinations, providing you are symptom-free and fever-free.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 11 of 20 Correct

Which organs can you donate while you are living?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. Transplant surgeons have developed new techniques and procedures to save more patients' lives through living donor transplants. It is now possible for a living person to donate a kidney, a portion of the liver, a portion of a lung and, in some rare instances, a portion of the pancreas.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 12 of 20 Correct

True or false: You can't pick and choose which organs you would like to donate.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. When you register to become an organ donor, you designate which of your organs that you wish to donate. Some people, for instance, may wish to donate only specific organs. Others wish to donate all of their organs, as well as their tissues and eyes.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 13 of 20 Correct

True or false: Kids under the age of 18 cannot be organ donors.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. All individuals can indicate their intent to donate an organ. Persons younger than 18 years of age require the consent of a parent or guardian to do so.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 14 of 20 Correct

How long can a donated heart be preserved before it needs to reach the recipient?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Hearts must be transplanted within approximately 4 hours after being removed from the donor.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 15 of 20 Correct

How many people are waiting for a kidney transplant?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The current waiting list for a kidney transplant is 90,000 people long.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 16 of 20 Correct

True or false: Organ donation will cost your family money.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Organ donation will not cost you or your family anything. Your family pays for your medical care and funeral costs, but not for organ donation. Costs related to donation are paid by the recipient, usually through insurance, Medicare or Medicaid.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 17 of 20 Correct

How long does it take for a living donor liver transplant to grow to normal size?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Living-donor liver transplants involve removing a segment of liver from a healthy living donor and implanting it into a recipient. Both the donor and recipient liver segments will grow to normal size in about six weeks.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 18 of 20 Correct

How safe is it to donate a kidney?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: A kidney donation surgery is one of the safest operations that one could have in the operating room. Risks to the donor are small and manageable (but can include pain, infection, pneumonia, blood clotting, collapsed lung, and allergic reaction to anesthesia).

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 19 of 20 Correct

True or false: If you sign a donor card, there's a chance your wishes will not be carried out.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. In the U.S., all 50 states abide by a law known as First Person Consent. This means that if you register to be an organ donor, nobody can override your decision to be a donor (not even your family).

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
Question 20 of 20 Correct

Which of the following should you do if you change your mind about donating your organs?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. You should tell your healthcare provider and your family that you have changed your mind and write to the Department of Health to have your name removed from the Registry. If you signed the back of your driver's license, you should cross out the information.

Being a Donor: Must-Know Facts
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