Healthcare Basics
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The Truth About Air Travel

More than one billion people travel by commercial aircraft each year. Test your flying IQ -- from jet lag to airplane safety.

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The Truth About Air Travel
The Truth About Air Travel
Question 1 of 20 Correct

What's the rule of thumb for carry-on items?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Remember the simple rule of "3-1-1" when packing your carry-on. It stands for bottles that are 3.4 ounces or less by volume; 1 quart-sized clear, plastic, zip-top bag; 1 bag per passenger placed in screening bin.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 2 of 20 Correct

Which of the following liquids is allowed in your carry-on?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. Breast milk, baby formula and medications are allowed in reasonable quantities greater than three ounces and do not need to be in a zip-top bag. Just declare these items for inspection at checkpoint and understand that officers may need to open these items to conduct additional screening.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 3 of 20 Correct

Which of the following items can be carried on?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Tweezers and disposable razors are allowed to be carried on. However, metal nail files and other sharp objects like scissors less than 4 inches long need to be in your checked baggage.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 4 of 20 Correct

Which of the following food items should be put in your checked bag or shipped ahead?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Liquid, aerosol and gel items such as cranberry sauce, jelly, jams, salad dressing and soups should be put in your checked bag, shipped ahead of time or be left at home if they are above the permitted 3.4-oz travel size. However, pies and cakes are permitted through the security checkpoint; just know that they are subject to additional screening.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 5 of 20 Correct

True or false: You get more radiation from a backscatter scanner in the security line than on your actual flight.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. You actually get 4,000 times more radiation in a flight traveling from coast to coast than you do from the backscatter scanner. Even more shocking? You'd need 40 backscatter scans to equal one dental X-ray. Still, if you're worried about going through a scanner, choose a pat-down instead.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 6 of 20 Correct

True or false: Metal detectors and handheld wands can affect the functioning of your pacemaker.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Metal detectors and handheld wands can adversely affect your pacemaker or ICD, so bring a note from your doctor and be prepared for a manual pat-down.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 7 of 20 Correct

If you're over 40 and your flight time is over 4 hours long, you should walk the aisle of the plane every ___ hours.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: If you're over 40 and your flight is more than 4 hours, stroll the plane every couple of hours. Long flights, cramped seats and age are all risk factors for deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot in a deep vein.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 8 of 20 Correct

True or false: Trips longer than 7 hours can triple your chance of getting DVT.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. So make sure you drink lots of water, stretch your legs in your seat and move around the cabin as much as you can.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 9 of 20 Correct

How much air is recirculated in the cabin of airplanes built after the late 1980s?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All commercial jet aircraft built after the late 1980s and a few modified older aircraft recirculate 10 to 50 percent of the air in the cabin mixed with outside air. The recirculated air passes through a series of filters 20 to 30 times per hour.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 10 of 20 Correct

True or false: The air cabin environment is not conducive to the spread of most infectious diseases.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. In most newer-model airplanes, the recycled air passes through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, which capture 99.9 percent of particles like bacteria, fungi and larger viruses. Air flow occurs transversely across the plane in limited bands, and air not forced up and down the length of the plane. As a result, the air cabin environment is not conducive to the spread of most infectious diseases.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 11 of 20 Correct

How much drool have scientists found on an airplane cushion?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Scientists have found drool from three different people on an airplane cushion. Despite how disgusting this may seem, Dr. Oz says "the vast majority of these germs are not dangerous. In fact, a lot of the secretions, if they're dry, have already lost their ability to hurt you."

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 12 of 20 Correct

There is usually ___ percent less moisture on a plane than inside your house.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: The low-humidity, dry-air environment inside a pressurized airplane cabin is moisture-sapping. There's actually 10 percent less moisture on a plane than inside your house. Your skin, lips and eyes become very dry almost immediately after getting on a plane. Drink plenty of water and apply a rich moisturizer when traveling. Try not to drink alcohol or eat salty foods, which will dehydrate you even more.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 13 of 20 Correct

True or false: Misting water on your face intermittently throughout a long flight is a great way to moisturize your skin.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Misting water on your face throughout a long flight will make matters worse because your skin will be even dryer once the waters evaporates. If you like to use a facial mist, make sure it contains something more than water, such as glycerin or aloe vera, which will keep your skin hydrated.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 14 of 20 Correct

When should most pregnant women avoid flying?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: After 36 weeks, most doctors suggest avoiding air travel because of the risk of giving birth without medical attention available. Doctors recommend pregnant women get up every one to two hours during a long flight to help stretch their legs and avoid the risk of blood clots.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 15 of 20 Correct

Which item of clothing could be dangerous to you in the event of a plane crash?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Wear comfortable, loose, thin clothes made of natural fibers. In the event of an emergency, synthetic clothing such as pantyhose will melt in intense heat and burn you. Pack your heels in your carry-on and wear comfortable, flat shoes that allow you to move easily in the event of a crash.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 16 of 20 Correct

Where should you aim the air vent?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Make a fist with your hand and place it directly over your chest, then aim the air vent to blow onto it. This will give you the best airflow to protect you from being exposed to an infection.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 17 of 20 Correct

True or false: Using hand sanitizer during your flight doesn't reduce your chance of getting sick.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false Pack your carry-on with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and use it early and often. This will reduce your chance of getting sick by 50 percent.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 18 of 20 Correct

True or false: Staph could be on your fold-down tray.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Pack sanitizing wipes along with your hand sanitizer! You'll want to wipe down your tray (and handrails), both of which can harbor the MRSA bacteria.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 19 of 20 Correct

True or false: Jet lag affects the part of the brain responsible for memory and learning even a month after a trip.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Jet lag limits the growth of brain cells and reduces brain activity, which can lead to memory and learning problems. Even a month after recovering, subjects still suffered from the effects of jet lag.

The Truth About Air Travel
Question 20 of 20 Correct

How can you avoid jet lag?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. Jet lag occurs because our biological clock doesn't match our destination. So, adjust your sleeping schedule a few days ahead of time. Make sure you pack an eye mask and ear plugs for your flight, and when you do get on the plane, change your watch to your new time zone and avoid alcohol and caffeine. If it's light out when you land, get some sunshine and if it's night time, stay out until at least 10 p.m. before you hit the hay. You'll be adjusted to your new destination in no time.

The Truth About Air Travel
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You got out of 20 correct. You're a health wiz!

The Truth About Air Travel
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The Truth About Air Travel
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