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Does a pharmacist call the doctor if there is a possible drug interaction?

If you are prescribed a medication that may interact with another medication you are taking, your pharmacist may call your doctor. The pharmacist can also refuse to fill the prescription if he or she is worried about serious drug interactions.

Hoyee Chan, MD
Internal Medicine
Yes. These days most pharmacies are computerized, and the computer automatically cross checked for drug-drug interactions. The pharmacists usually contact your doctors for alternatives if there are possible interactions. As a matter of fact, our medical group and affiliated hospitals are completely computerized, and the computer automatically cross checked for any drug interactions every time when I prescribe.
 
Many pharmacists call the physician's office is there is potential for a significant drug interaction with a prescribed medication. Many electronic medical record systems have programs that alert physicians to potential drug interactions at the time of prescribing them as well.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.