Genital Warts

Genital Warts

Genital Warts
Genital warts are contagious warts around the genitals caused by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus, or HPV. It is one of the most common STDs, affecting more women than men. Doctors can perform a gynecological exam to determine whether or not you have genital warts. They are transmitted through skin-to-skin contact with an infected person. To prevent contraction, it’s important to practice safe, protected sex with limited partners. A vaccine is also available to help prevent HPV.

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  • 2 Answers
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    A Dermatology, answered on behalf of
    Some things you can do to manage genital warts on a daily basis are:
    1. Do not pick! This can spread the warts.
    2. Get in to see your doctor asap.
    3. After the treatment, do not pick scab off. Use vaseline to cover the area.
    4. Make sure to tell your partern(s).
    5. Get tested for other STD's.
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  • 2 Answers
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    A Dermatology, answered on behalf of
    Yes, genital warts can be prevented. These lesions are caused by HPV and the vaccine against the virus can help. It is now recommended that both, boys and girls get vaccinated. Adults can also receive the vaccine. Using safe sex practices can also help prevent the spread of these lesions.
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    Vaccinations that protect against HPV may help reduce your risk for genital warts. There are many types of HPV (human papillomavirus), and vaccinations may protect you from several of the types. These vaccines are given in a series of three injections and protect against HPV types 6 and 11 (which cause about 80% of the cases of genital warts), and 16 and 18 (which can cause cervical cancer). These vaccines are recommended for girls and women between the ages of 9 and 26, so talk to your doctor if you're interested in being vaccinated.

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    Genital warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which usually enters the body during sexual contact. The virus commonly enters through the genitals, rectum, or mouth, and infects the skin's upper layer. Once in the skin, the virus causes small bumps or cauliflower-like growths that may itch or burn. These warts may form in the genital or anal area, or in the mouth or throat. If left untreated, the warts often go away on their own, but certain types of HPV can cause cervical cancer and other cancers in areas affected by the virus.

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    Genital warts are caused by certain types of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Some types of HPV can lead to genital cancers in men and women. The most common types of HPV associated with genital warts do not lead to cancer, but some do, and a medical exam should be done.
  • 2 Answers
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    A Dermatology, answered on behalf of
    Genital warts, especially if left untreated can cause permanent damage. The worst outcome is cancer, which can be of the cervix, vagina, penis, and anus. This is one of the most important reasons to treat the lesions.
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    If the warts are visible, doctors may be able to diagnose genital warts by just looking at the symptoms. In some cases, though, diagnosing genital warts may be more difficult than it seems. This is because the warts aren't always visible, especially if they form inside on the cervix or inside the anus. In those cases, doctors may use colposcopy to diagnose genital warts. This involves putting a chemical stain in the area to make warts more visible, and then using a tiny magnifying tool to inspect the area for growths. Because women may have genital warts on their cervix without realizing it, it's important for women to get regular Pap tests to look for abnormalities that may be caused by genital warts.

  • 3 Answers
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    A Administration, answered on behalf of
    The form of human papillomavirus, or HPV, that causes genital warts is not the same form of the virus that causes cervical cancer. Although obnoxious, genital warts are harmless and treatable; a doctor can freeze them off. However, because genital warts are transmitted through skin-to-skin contact, you risk transmitting HPV to your partner if you have them and are sexually active.
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    Symptoms of genital warts may vary from person to person, depending on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) they have. The most common symptoms are small bumps or growths around the genital area (in women, on the vulva, vagina, and surrounding skin, and in men, on the penis or scrotum). These growths may also form in or around the anus (if spread through anal sex), or even in the mouth or throat (if spread through oral sex). The warts may look like small cauliflowers in shape, and there may be one or many warts at a time. Some people experience itching or burning with the warts, but others have no noticeable symptoms at all.

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    Caring for someone with genital warts may just involve supporting them through their treatment. You should help them get treatment from a doctor, and encourage them to take care of their overall health through balanced diet and sufficient rest. Some people may feel embarrassed or ashamed because of their genital warts, so be sure to provide understanding and emotional support for your loved one.