Weight Loss Diets

Weight Loss Diets

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    A answered
    Created by Dr. Barbara Rolls, a nutrition expert, the Volumetrics diet tries to fill you up by emphasizing foods that promote satiety. So rather than seeking fullness from calories or high-fat foods (energy-dense foods), the foods emphasized are full of fiber and/or water content. Non-starchy vegetables, nonfat milk and broth-like soups feature, as do fruits because of their water and fiber components.
     
    Rolls recommends soups, casseroles, stews and fruit-based desserts which fill you up because of the water volume naturally found in these types of food presentations. Fiber, lean and plant-based proteins and fish are also included. Sweets, fats and alcohols are allowed – just sparingly. Keeping food records, increasing physical activity and learning to recognize low-energy dense foods are other key components of the diet.
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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of
    You Must Restrict Calories to Trigger WEIGHT Loss.
    Restricting calories drives weight loss. The most basic rule of fat loss is governed by energy balance. Energy balance is the relationship between energy in, the calories consumed via cheeseburgers (food) and coffee (drinks), and energy out, the calories burned through daily energy requirements and exercise.

    Basically, if you're burning more calories than you're consuming, you should lose weight. This is an oversimplification based on how complex the human body is, but at their roots all successful fat loss diets focus on caloric restriction to drive fat loss.

    Examples: 
    The Slow Carb Diet
    The slow carb diet eliminates most starchy carbs, sugars, and fruits to limit the number calories you take in per day.

    The Atkins Diet (80's), South Beach Diet (90's), Paleo Diet (now)
    These diets severely limit carbohydrate intake to restrict eating options and drive caloric intake down.

    Intermittent Fasting
    Intermittent fasting limits the amount of time you can eat in a day, making it near impossible to eat too much.

    There are many methods to fat loss, but at the heart of every successful fat loss diet is eating fewer calories than your body burns. This is what causes an energy deficit and drives WEIGHT LOSS.

    Maintaining or increasing muscle tissue (metabolism) through strength training and eating the proper nutrition (macronutrients (P,C,F,) is what drives FAT LOSS.

    Any diet or eating style can cause weight loss.

    Fat loss eating is completely different.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Not since Atkins has a diet made such an international splash. The Dukan Diet shares Atkin's pillar of low carbohydrate consumption. However, this new fad encourages eating anything you want 6 days a week. How does it work? The Dukan Diet breaks down into 4 phases.

    1. The Attack Phase: This phase lasts between 1-10 days depending on how much weight you have to lose (around a week for people who have to lose about 25 pounds). During the attack phase, there are no calorie restrictions. Your diet consists mainly of lean protein and allows virtually no carbohydrates. Your meals also include fat-free dairy products and the "secret weapon" of the diet -- oat bran.

    Proponents of Dukan maintain that 1 1/2 tablespoons of oat bran a day allow people to feel fuller, while the fiber efficiently cleans out their system.

    2. The Cruise Phase: During this phase, you continue to eat foods from phase 1 (lean proteins, fat-free dairy and oat bran), only now you add non-starchy vegetables every other day. You maintain this phase until you reach your target weight.

    3. The Consolidation Phase. Dr. Dukan, the creator of this diet, maintains that this phase is where the Dukan Diet sets itself apart from the competition. The Consolidation Phase focuses on adding back the carbohydrates into the diet. Additionally, you can have 2 "celebration meals" a week where you can eat anything you want -- but no binging on a regular basis. Once a week, you must go back to eating only lean protein.

    4. The Stabilization Phase: The final phase of this diet focuses on applying the 3 rules to live by:

    - One day a week eat just eat protein. It must be the same day each week.
    - Eat 3 tablespoons of oat bran a day for the rest of your life.
    - Never take elevators or escalators. Walk 20 minutes a day.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Crash diets cut calories drastically. They often restrict entire food groups as well. Such diets can result in rapid weight loss, although that weight is mostly water. That's because to the body a crash diet feels like being starved, and its reaction to starvation is to release water. As soon as you start eating normally again, the water—and the weight—will return.

    Beware of any diet that drastically cuts calories, forbids entire food groups (like fruits or grains), includes pills or potions, advises that you eat foods only in certain combinations or tells you to skip meals. In the long run, crash diets won't help you lose weight and keep it off.
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    There are many versions of the grapefruit diet, which was developed in the 1970s. However, they all require the intake of one half of a grapefruit before every meal. Some versions require that dieters eat until they are full, but most diet plans limit daily caloric intake to less than 800 calories. The average dieter generally participates for one to three weeks.

    The diet is based on the idea that grapefruits contain an enzyme that helps the body use fat for energy. Proponents of the diet claim that eating grapefruit before a meal will give the consumer the benefit of fat-burning enzymes.

    The grapefruit diet breakfast typically consists of 1/2 of a grapefruit, two eggs prepared any way and two slices of bacon. Lunch generally consists of 1/2 of a grapefruit, a salad with any type of dressing and as much meat as desired. The typical dinner consists of 1/2 a grapefruit, a salad with any type of dressing or red or green vegetables prepared with butter and/or spices, meat or fish, and 1 cup of coffee or tea. Snacking in between meals is not permitted. However, one cup of skim milk can be consumed as a bedtime snack.

    Grapefruit is low in calories, contains no fat and has minimal sodium. Grapefruit also contains an abundance of vitamin C and pink grapefruit contains beta-carotene. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the diet causes rapid weight loss.

    Critics of the grapefruit diet argue that the amount of caffeinated beverages may be dangerous to some. The consumption of too many caffeinated beverages can lead to dehydration. The diet is also argued to be lacking in vitamins, minerals and other essential nutrients. Other critics argue that any diet that relies so heavily on one food is too restrictive.

    The diet has been claimed to be dangerous because dieters are severely limiting caloric intake to less than 800 calories a day. Caution is also advised in those taking herbs, supplements or drugs as a constituent found in grapefruits, called furanocoumarins, may alter the safety and efficacy of these agents.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Grapefruit may inhibit the body's ability to absorb certain prescription drugs, herbs or supplements. A qualified healthcare provider should be consulted before beginning a new diet plan.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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    A qualified healthcare provider should be consulted before making decisions about therapies and/or health conditions.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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    The author of UltraMetabolism claims that eating the foods he advocates and practicing a low stress lifestyle will "program" the body to regain health and lose weight. Hyman claims that food and behavior tell genes how to behave.

    Although environmental and behavioral factors are known to have some influence on gene expression, no higher quality trials have shown these aspects of day to day living to exert complete and simultaneous control on all aspects of gene expression.

    UltraMetabolism claims that the reader should be more aware of the purported lifestyle and diet modifications that may result in complete control over health and body size. Because he believes that government and medical organizations do not do enough to educate the consumer on the benefits of some sorts of food and exercise, Hyman urges individuals to adopt a healthy lifestyle.

    Assessment of weight involves evaluating body mass index, waist circumference, and the patient's risk factors.

    • BMI = weight (kg)/[height (m)]2
    • Overweight is defined as a BMI of 25-29.9 kg/m2
    • Obesity is defined as a BMI of %u226530 kg/m2
    • Waist circumference for men >40 inches or women >35 inches indicates an increased risk for those with a BMI of 25-34.9.

    Coronary heart disease or other atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and sleep apnea are factors associated with a very high risk of developing disease complications and mortality.

    Weight loss is recommended for those who are obese (BMI %u226530kg/m2) and for those who are classified as overweight (BMI of 25-29.9kg/m2) or have a high waist circumference and two or more risk factors.

    A 2007 article in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings stated that treatment of obesity requires the physician and patient to address diet, physical activity, and behavioral issues. In some cases, medication and surgical treatments not discussed in UltraMetabolism may offer other options.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

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    The Slim-Fast® diet is created around the premise that controlling hunger is one of the most difficult issues of following a new eating plan to lose weight. The Slim-Fast® corporation claims that its products retain a sensation of fullness for up to four hours. This sensation of fullness may prevent the people who consume these products from eating more, because they will not feel hungry.

    The Slim-Fast® corporation claims that its products help people become healthier by promoting food portion control and informed selection of foods.

    A 2006 study by Truby et al. evaluated four popular diets, including Slim-Fast®, and found that all patients lost about the same amount of weight when assigned to one of four diets for a period of six months. Following the diet plan for the length of the trial was the most important factor in patient weight loss.

    A 2004 study by Huerta et al. provided Slim-Fast® products to lower income obese patients. All patients were instructed to consume one low calorie meal a day, in addition to two Slim-Fast® meal replacements a day. Patients who adhered to the diet reached an average of 7% reduction in body weight, and the study authors suggested that meal replacement products be incorporated into nutrition clinics serving lower income patients.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

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    Ultrametabolism is a diet book written by Dr. Mark Hyman that aims to help individuals obtain an optimal state of health by consuming foods that will improve wellness and prevent disease. The author claims that eating a healthier diet will improve the individual's likelihood of staying well and losing weight by changing the body's expression of genes.
    The key concept of Ultrametabolism is nutrigenomics, a concept created by Hyman. Though the specifics of his theory are vague, the author claims that certain foods will cause the genes present in better health to be expressed more often, while the genes predisposing an individual to health problems (such as obesity, which is in part a trait inherited from one's parents) will be expressed less often.
    Hyman bases his theory for weight loss on the theory that foods humans have eaten over the past 2,000 years before the rise of fast food culture in industrialized nations were healthier. Though the diets of people throughout the world have always been incredibly varied and their availability and quality is usually based on a complex equation of resource availability and distribution, Hyman does not delve into specifics. Regardless, Hyman claims that such information has been passed down as "folk knowledge."
    The author developed his diet plan by working with over 2,000 patients in private practice to help them achieve weight loss. Although the Ultrametabolism website claims that there is scientific research to support this diet plan, no citations or consensus statements are cited. Although the diet has been featured in many popular magazines and talk shows, no available higher quality human trials have been conducted on the Ultrametabolism diet.
    The popularity of Ultrametabolism rides on the trend of diets that encourage people to eat a balanced diet recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), rather than discarding commonly accepted principles of nutrition to lose weight.
    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.