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How should bitter melon be stored?

Michael T. Murray, ND
Naturopathic Medicine

Bitter melon can be stored in the fruit bin of the refrigerator covered and unwashed for four to five days. This fruit is delicate and should be handled with care. It is sensitive to cold and should not be stored below 50 degrees F. Symptoms of cold exposure include pitting, discolored areas, and a high incidence of decay. On the other hand, fruits stored at temperatures greater than 55 degrees F. tend to continue to ripen, turning yellow and splitting open. Store bitter melon away from apples, pears, potatoes, and other fruits and vegetables that produce ethylene gas, since it will cause the fruit to continue to ripen and become more bitter.

Encyclopedia of Healing Foods

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Encyclopedia of Healing Foods

From the bestselling authors of The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine, the most comprehensive and practical guide available to the nutritional benefits and medicinal properties of virtually everything...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.