The Benefits of Strong Hands and Knees

The Benefits of Strong Hands and Knees

Got a killer grip? And some decent thigh muscles? Good. It will probably help you stay out of trouble in later life.

In a study of what happens to people in their 70s and beyond, strong knees and a strong grip were associated with less risk of hospitalization.

How much is enough?
When the muscles that support knees were strong in a group of seniors, hospitalization risk dropped almost 70 percent! Not bad. A good hand grip reduced the risk by more than 50 percent. And get this: Muscle strength was more important than muscle size. So worry more about toning what you have, less about building yourself up into Mr. Olympia proportions.

How it saves you
Having weak muscles and poor balance increases your risk of falls. And, by extension, fractures. And, by further extension, emergency room visits that can have you laid up for weeks. Ow.

Are you killing your knees? Find out how to ditch bad habits and improve the health of these uberimportant joints.

Medically reviewed in December 2019.

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