Environmental Allergies

Environmental Allergies

Environmental Allergies
With environmental allergies, reducing your exposure to whatever is irritating you is key. Some people are allergic to household cleaners such as laundry detergent, hence the many varieties of mild detergent. With common irritants like mold and dust, a cleaning routine can help. Reduce mold by removing houseplants, using a dehumidifier, avoiding carpet in the bathroom and cleaning indoor trash cans and shower curtains with a mix of water and chlorine bleach. Reduce dust by replacing carpets with wood or linoleum, removing drapes and feather pillows, regularly vacuuming soft furniture and floors, and washing bedding weekly.

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    If you suspect you have allergies, contact your family physician. Your doctor may see you or may refer you to an allergist. There are a number of methods to diagnose allergies. Your doctor may ask about your family medical history, have you keep a symptom diary, do a skin prick test, or do a blood test.

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    Children can experience the same allergic symptoms as adults. People are more likely to develop allergies in childhood than they are later in life. Sometimes children may outgrow an allergy, though it may reappear at a later date.

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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    Hay fever really isn’t a specific diagnosis. It’s what we usually refer to as allergic rhinitis. Symptoms of allergic rhinitis are those classic allergy symptoms – stuffy nose, itchy eyes, watery eyes and sneezing.
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    Seasonal allergies, sometimes called “hay fever,” are not a simple nuisance. “If left untreated, allergies can noticeably impair a child’s ability to learn and play,” says Maria Garcia-Lloret, M.D., pediatric allergy/immunology and rheumatology specialist at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA. A child with a runny nose and itchy eyes is usually restless and does not pay attention. Severe nasal congestion usually leads to trouble sleeping and daytime sleepiness or inattentiveness. In severe cases, allergies can also cause an asthma attack.
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    Yes, you may have a latex allergy even if you have negative blood work. The diagnosis of a latex allergy is based on a thorough history. If your doctor suspects you may have a latex allergy, he or she can order a blood test. Although this test may confirm a latex allergy, it does not pick up all cases of latex allergy and may be negative even if you have a true allergy. If your symptoms are consistent with a latex allergy but your test is negative, your doctor may refer you to have a skin prick test done. However, this test can cause a severe allergic reaction called anaphylactic shock and should only be done in specialized centers.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered

    Testing may not be necessary if the allergist is experienced. A good allergy medical history should routinely include questions about visible water damage at home, school, work--wherever the patient spends considerable amounts of time. Water damage is an indicator that mold might be taking hold in the indoor environment. Basements and laundry rooms may also have a permanent musty, mildew smell. This is also an indicator of mold. Mold can also be a factor if the patient spends a lot of time in the woods because fallen leaves can also produce mold as they decompose. Unfortunately, immunotherapy for mold is not as effective as for many other allergens.

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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    Latex is from the milky sap of the rubber tree. Latex is all around us. We use latex to make rubber. It is in toys, clothing, rubber tires, rubber bands, rubber gloves, some plants (poinsettia, spurges, ficus trees, rubber plants) and many other items. Latex contains proteins that cause allergies in some people.
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    If you have asthma, inhaling mold spores may trigger symptoms of asthma as well as symptoms of allergies. In certain cases, the reaction to mold may be severe enough to cause a serious asthma attack. As with most mold allergies, the best way to prevent mold-related asthma symptoms is to avoid exposure to mold as much as possible. In case of exposure, make sure you have emergency medication so you're prepared for a potential reaction.

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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Common allergy symptoms include sniffing, sneezing, watery or itchy eyes, coughing, fatigue, sleep disturbances, itchy ears and more. It is important to treat your allergy symptoms to prevent worsening sinus infections from developing.

    When people come to see me with recurrent sinus infections, I often consider under-treated allergies as the culprit. The congestion from allergies becomes a fertile ground upon which viruses and bacteria can multiply. If we eliminate the foundation, often the infections will have no place to “set up camp."
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Dr. Clifford Bassett - What are some natural remedies for seasonal allergies?

    Seasonal allergies can make you feel crummy, but there are lots of simple things you can do to help prevent bothersome symptoms, says allergy specialist Dr. Clifford Bassett. To find out why wearing movie star sunglasses can help you avoid allergy problems, watch this video.


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