Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB)

Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB)

Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB)
Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) is irregular vaginal bleeding caused by changes in hormone levels. When this happens, your periods may come less than 21 days apart, or more than 35 days apart. Vaginal bleeding may be heavy, or last for longer than a week. Often times, DUB occurs when you fail to ovulate during your menstrual cycle, which causes abnormal levels of certain hormones. Sometimes this pattern of an ovulation continues for several cycles or more, which may warrant a visit to your health care provider. The most common treatment for DUB is the use of various hormone medications. Sometimes the doctor will just advise you to wait a few months before beginning treatment.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) is an excessive vaginal bleeding that is abnormal to the menstrual cycle. Bleeding occurs either more or less frequently than is typical for menstruation and the bleeding may significantly thicker and heavier than it should be. It is also possible that bleeding could occur very frequently and be present in between periods. The changes in bleeding are caused by irregular hormones. These irregularities are usually treatable by hormones, and in some instances surgical methods will be used.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    What Causes Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding?
    Hormone imbalance is a common cause of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, says Kord Strebel, MD, an OB/GYN at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he describes other potential causes of the bleeding.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding experience irregularly timed periods (less than 28 or more than 35 days apart) with occasional bleeding in between periods. Vaginal bleeding during the period is often heavier than normal and lasts more than the normal period length of seven days. Excessive blood loss can lead to fatigue and anemia. Beyond the menstrual cycle, women will experience symptoms of irregular hormone levels. This includes body hair growth and mood swings.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Women of certain ages are more likely to experience dysfunctional uterine bleeding. In the beginning of a woman's menstruation, usually between ages 9 and 15, problems of dysfunctional uterine bleeding are common. Women in the beginning stages of menopause also experience irregularity and dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    Before diagnosing dysfunctional uterine bleeding, your doctor will want to rule out other causes of excessive bleeding like pregnancy and blood clotting problems. Then the doctor will determine whether or not you have dysfunctional uterine bleeding by doing a pelvic exam and a number of laboratory tests to check blood counts, hormone functioning, and anemia. If you are at high risk for developing endometrial cancer, the doctor may also to a biopsy of your uterine lining. Other tests may include transvaginal ultrasonography and hysteroscopy, if needed.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Irregular periods are expected when a young woman starts her period or when a woman is about to enter menopause, but abnormal bleeding like this can have a number of causes. Talk to your doctor if your dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) symptoms are disruptive to your everyday life. Hormonal treatment can make DUB more manageable. It is also important to go to the doctor if you think you are at risk for endometrial cancer. Risk factors for endometrial cancer include women over the age of 40 (especially between ages 60-70), obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, a history of irregular periods, polycystic ovary syndrome, gallbladder disease, never having been pregnant, and problems related to the uterine lining that your doctor can find through various imaging examinations.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Because dysfunctional uterine bleeding is caused by an abnormal amount of hormones, medication used to treat DUB works by regulating the body's hormones. Birth control pills use a combination of estrogen and a progestin to regulate the hormones related to menstruation. These help make periods lighter and more regular. These hormones can also be injected or used in an intrauterine device (IUD). Ibuprofen or another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication taken just before the beginning of the period may also help.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    You cannot initially stop the causes of hormone imbalances and dysfunctional uterine bleeding. With treatment, though, you can prevent the bleeding problems from persisting. Hormonal therapy can regulate hormones and make periods more manageable. Further surgical treatments can also help with the severity of periods.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    When caring for someone with dysfunctional uterine bleeding, be aware of symptoms of the disorder. Be sensitive to mood swings, which are a symptom of irregular hormones, and remember that fatigue is problem associated with excessive bleeding. Anemia can be a serious side effect and require iron treatment. Make sure the person takes all medications as prescribed. If the person is having problems because of infertility related to the condition, be sensitive to the emotional stress this may be placing her under.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding can be treated completely through hormone therapy in most cases. Some people may require removal of the lining of the uterus to fix heavy bleeding, either through dilation and curettage or endometrial ablation. Rarely, people may require a hysterectomy to completely remove the uterus. Because of the serious results of this surgery, such as infertility, it is no longer used as often as it was in the past and is usually only used with menopausal women. Anemia is a possible complication, but this can be treated through iron supplements.