Diet & Nutrition
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Are You Ready to Go Meatless?

Think a vegetarian diet might be for you? See how well you can separate fact from fiction when it comes to going meat-free.

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Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 1 of 20 Correct

True or false: Vegetarians eat no meat, fish, dairy or any foods that are the product of an animal.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. In addition to fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes, many vegetarians also eat eggs and dairy. People who do not eat any meat or animal products are called pure vegetarians or vegans.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 2 of 20 Correct

Vegetarians who eat eggs but not dairy are called what?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: People who eat a vegetarian diet that includes eggs, but not dairy, are called ovo vegetarians. Vegetarians who eat dairy but not eggs are called lacto vegetarians. Some vegetarians eat fish, too -- these vegetarians are called pescatarians.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 3 of 20 Correct

True or false: A vegetarian diet can help you lose weight.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. A plant-based diet can help you lose weight by offering plenty of low- fat, low-calorie options. But a vegetarian diet doesn't guarantee a lower calorie diet. To lose weight, choose nutrient-dense whole grains, fruits, vegetables, healthy fats such as olive oil and protein-rich foods such as nuts, legumes, beans and soy products. Avoid processed, packaged foods high in saturated fat, sodium and sugar.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 4 of 20 Correct

Vegetarian diets can be inadequate in which of these nutrients?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: People who eat a vegetarian diet will have to work harder to ensure they are getting adequate levels of vitamin B12, vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids. All three of these nutrients, plus calcium and iron, are typically lower in vegetarian diets due to a lack of meat protein and dairy.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 5 of 20 Correct

True or false: Women who are vegetarians have an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Women who are vegetarians -- especially those who also avoid dairy products -- are at an increased risk of developing osteoporosis. A diet rich in calcium helps maintain adequate bone mineral density.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 6 of 20 Correct

Which of these non-dairy foods is high in calcium?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Dairy products are not the only good source of calcium. Foods high in calcium include broccoli, collard greens, turnip greens, tofu, soybeans and calcium-fortified juices.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 7 of 20 Correct

True or false: The healthcare professional best suited to help vegetarians learn to eat a balanced diet is a general practitioner.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. A registered dietitian may be the best person to help you develop a meat-free diet that offers adequate intake of all vitamins and minerals.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 8 of 20 Correct

True or false: Most vegetarians struggle with anemia.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. However, animal products are among the best sources of iron, and unless a vegetarian is being sure to eat a balanced diet, anemia can be a concern.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 9 of 20 Correct

True or false: Vegetarians should always take iron supplements.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Many non-meat sources of iron exist, so taking a supplement is not always required. Good sources of iron include prunes and prune juice, fortified cereals and grain products, raisins and spinach.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 10 of 20 Correct

True or false: Vegetarians are 50 percent less likely to die from cancer than non-vegetarians.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. According to Michael Murray, ND, being a vegetarian has a lot of health perks, including a 50 percent lower risk of cancer or heart disease.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 11 of 20 Correct

Which of these may be a complication of a vegetarian diet in people with diabetes?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: People with diabetes or blood sugar disorders should be cautious on a vegetarian diet. Fruits contain high amounts of sugar, and eating too many could worsen your condition. But if a diabetic eats a balanced vegetarian diet, it can actually be very beneficial to his or her overall health.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 12 of 20 Correct

True or false: A vegetarian diet can protect the dental health of people with diabetes or blood sugar disorders.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. A vegetarian diet may help people with diabetes have better glucose control. This can help prevent dental problems that occur when blood sugar is frequently high.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 13 of 20 Correct

True or false: Most vegetarians will experience hair loss as a result of very low protein levels.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Vegetarians who do not eat an adequate amount of protein for an extended period of time may experience hair loss. To be on the safe side, it's a good idea to work with a registered dietitian to plan a proper vegetarian diet.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 14 of 20 Correct

Tempeh is a good source of which of the following?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Tempeh, a fermented soybean product that is a common meat-substitute in a vegetarian diet, is a very good source of protein, manganese and phosphorous. It is also a good source of vitamins B2, B6 and B3, as well as the minerals magnesium, copper and iron. But because evidence shows that the forms of B12 found in fermented foods may not be easily absorbed by the body, vegetarians should still consider supplementing their diet with vitamin B12.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 15 of 20 Correct

Which of these is a non-soy vegetarian protein alternative?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Soy is certainly not the only protein-rich alternative to meat. Foods like quinoa, nut butters and black beans make great non-soy protein alternatives. Others include lentils, nuts, seeds, whole grains and hummus.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 16 of 20 Correct

Which of these is a health benefit of soy, a popular meat alternative?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Soy has been shown to lower cholesterol, prevent atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and increase the relaxation)of the blood vessels.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 17 of 20 Correct

Which of these foods is a good source of vitamin B12?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Vegetarians can get vitamin B12 from fortified breakfast cereals, fortified soy milk, eggs and yogurt.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 18 of 20 Correct

True or false: Children who eat a vegetarian diet may grow taller than non-vegetarian children.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. A study of 1,765 school-aged children in Southern California found that those who ate a vegetarian diet were about an inch taller than the non-vegetarian children.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 19 of 20 Correct

Which of these foods is an alternative source for omega-3 fatty acids?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Fish is the best source of omega-3 fatty acids, but unless you're a pescatarian (vegetarians who eat fish, too), you'll have to look elsewhere for a dietary source of this heart-healthy fat. Flax seed, linseed oil and walnuts are all rich in omega-3 fatty acids.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
Question 20 of 20 Correct

True or false: Vegetarians typically have less stamina during physical exercise than non-vegetarians.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. A vegetarian diet will not typically affect athletic performance. Whether or not you eat meat, the key to endurance is a balanced, healthy diet that offers adequate vitamins, minerals and nutrients -- especially protein. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that vegetarians eat 10 percent more protein because non-meat proteins aren't as easily broken down in the body.

Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
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Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
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Are You Ready to Go Meatless?
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