Food Labels 101
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Food Labels 101

Decoding food labels can be confusing. Take our quiz to see how well you can separate nutrition facts from fiction.

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Food Labels 101
Food Labels 101
Question 1 of 20 Correct

When analyzing nutrition labels on food, how many calories is considered "high?"

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Foods with 400 calories or more are considered high-calorie foods. Foods with 100 calories are moderately high in calories. But you want to consider other things, too -- such as fiber, total fat, vitamins and protein, when making food choices.

Food Labels 101
Question 2 of 20 Correct

True or false: If a product says it contains whole grains, it is a whole grain product.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. By definition, a whole grain food is at least 51 percent whole grain by weight. Just containing whole grains isn't enough to be a good source of whole grains.

Food Labels 101
Question 3 of 20 Correct

Which of these flours is a whole grain?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Enriched, bleached or refined flours are stripped of much of their nutrients and are not whole grain. Wheat flour may or may not be whole grain. The only whole grain flour is one that has the word "whole" before the type of grain.

Food Labels 101
Question 4 of 20 Correct

How many servings of whole grains should you get in a day?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Aim to get 3 servings of whole grains each day.

Food Labels 101
Question 5 of 20 Correct

When choosing a snack food such as crackers, how many milligrams of sodium per serving should you aim to stay under?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: When choosing snack foods, aim to stay under 400 milligrams of sodium per serving.

Food Labels 101
Question 6 of 20 Correct

Which of these nutrients does not have a recommended daily intake?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: A recommended daily intake for sugar does not exist. However, the Institute of Medicine suggests limiting the intake of added sugars to no more than 25 percent of total energy consumption (total amount of calories you eat in a day).

Food Labels 101
Question 7 of 20 Correct

True or false: The nutrition information on a food's label is for the entire package of food.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. The nutrition information on a food label is for one serving of the food. Packages of food may contain multiple servings, so if you eat more or less than one serving, you will need to add or subtract nutrition numbers accordingly.

Food Labels 101
Question 8 of 20 Correct

True or false: The order in which ingredients are listed on the label has no specific meaning.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Ingredients are listed by prevalence or amount. That means that the first couple of ingredients are the more significant ingredients in the food's recipe. If sugar is one of the first listed ingredients, it's safe to assume the product is mostly sugar.

Food Labels 101
Question 9 of 20 Correct

The nutrition numbers and percentages on food labels are based on what size daily calorie diet?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Daily Values are recommended levels of nutrients for a person eating 2,000 calories a day. If you are eating more or less calories, adjust the numbers accordingly.

Food Labels 101
Question 10 of 20 Correct

A food's nutrition label says one serving will give you 5 percent of your Daily Value of saturated fat. Is this number high or low?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is low. Daily Values at 5 percent or less are considered low. Certain numbers are good to keep low--total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. But numbers for vitamins, minerals and fiber listed as below 5 percent mean the food doesn't have much nutrition.

Food Labels 101
Question 11 of 20 Correct

True or false: If a food contains less than half a gram of trans fat, the food manufacturer can list that the food has 0 grams of trans fat.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. If a food has less than 0.5 grams of trans fat in a serving size, the food manufacturer can round down and say it contains no trans fat. If you eat more than one serving, you may actually be getting several grams of trans fat without knowing it.

Food Labels 101
Question 12 of 20 Correct

Which ingredient is an indicator of trans fat?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Look for the words "partially hydrogenated." Even if the label claims 0g trans fat, if you see partially hydrogenated oils in the list of ingredients, the product does contain trans fats.

Food Labels 101
Question 13 of 20 Correct

Which combination of these ingredients added together create the "Total Carb" number on a nutrition label?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Sugar, starch and dietary fiber make up the "Total Carb" number on a nutrition label. Dietary fiber and sugar are also listed separately.

Food Labels 101
Question 14 of 20 Correct

Which of these is a form of sugar?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: High-fructose corn syrup, fructose and honey are all sugars. If these ingredients or any other sugars are listed among the first few ingredients, the food is high in sugar.

Food Labels 101
Question 15 of 20 Correct

True or false: Foods with 5 grams of fiber or more are considered "high-fiber" foods.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. If a food has 5 grams of dietary fiber or more per serving, it's considered a high-fiber food.

Food Labels 101
Question 16 of 20 Correct

Which of these foods is listed only as a percentage on food labels?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Calcium is listed as a percent of Daily Value (DV), as are vitamins, iron and some other nutrients. Look at the percent DV for calcium on food labels to determine how much one serving contributes to the total amount you need per day. A food with 20% DV or more contributes a lot of calcium to your daily nutrient intake; a food with 5% DV or less contributes very little.

Food Labels 101
Question 17 of 20 Correct

True or false: Food manufacturers that promote their foods as "gluten-free" have met FDA standards proving their foods do not have gluten.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. The FDA has not yet established clear requirements for labeling a food "gluten-free" -- although a definition may not be far away. For now, manufacturers can say a food is gluten free with no government standards to back up the claim. Therefore, people who require a gluten-free diet must read the label to determine if a food really is gluten-free.

Food Labels 101
Question 18 of 20 Correct

True or false: A box of crackers that claim they are "natural" must have met FDA standards which require that the food is free of chemical preservatives or hormones.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. "Natural" has no specific meaning, except for meat and poultry products. A claim that a food is "natural" or "all-natural" is left up entirely to the food manufacturer and may not be an honest claim.

Food Labels 101
Question 19 of 20 Correct

What does the nutritional claim "salt free" mean?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: To be labeled "salt free," a food must contain 5 milligrams of sodium per serving or less. "Low-sodium" foods contain 140 milligrams of sodium per serving or less.

Food Labels 101
Question 20 of 20 Correct

What does the nutritional claim "fat free" mean?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: To be labeled "fat free," a food must contain less than 0.5 grams of fat per serving. "Reduced fat" means the food has 25 percent less fat than a comparison food. Fat-free foods may not always be the best nutritional choice, though. Often, fat-free foods have added sodium or sugar to boost flavor that's lost when fat is removed.

Food Labels 101
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Food Labels 101
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