Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Plastic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    Why Are Diabetics More Susceptible to Wounds?
    Diabetics are more susceptible to wounds due to decreased blood flow, says Brian Evans, MD, from West Hills Hospital & Medical Center. Learn more in this video.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Treatment for diabetes-related sexual dysfunction in women depends on the cause. Women experiencing vaginal dryness should consult with their doctor and/or gynecologist to see if low estrogen levels are the cause. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can reverse this problem in some women. However, estrogen may elevate blood glucose levels in some women. If vaginal dryness is diabetes related, over-the-counter lubricants may be a safer choice. Women should check with their doctor before considering these medications.

    The best way for women to avoid diabetes-related sexual dysfunction is to manage their disease well and keep blood glucose levels in control, which will lessen the risk for neuropathy, circulatory problems and chronic infections. Women with good diabetes management habits also have higher energy levels and less anxiety, which contribute to more enjoyable love making. If blood glucose levels aren't where they should be, adjustments to diet, medication and weight loss is beneficial for both diabetes control and self-esteem.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    Diabetic nephropathy is kidney disease that occurs in people who have diabetes. It affects about 20 to 30 percent of people with diabetes, according to some estimates, and is a common cause of kidney failure.

    Your kidneys contain millions of tiny filtering units called nephrons that process protein from foods you consume, filtering the waste and excess water out into urine, and protein and red blood cells out into your bloodstream. In someone who has diabetes, high levels of blood sugar make the kidneys work extra hard to filter the blood. With time, the nephrons begin not to work as well and your kidneys leak protein (albumin) into the blood. This leakage can show up on a blood test, a result known as microalbuminuria.

    Maintaining normal blood sugar levels as much as possible can help to prevent microalbuminuria and nephropathy.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) often gives plenty of warning before it happens, but it can also occur with little warning. If you regularly check your blood glucose several times during the day, you won’t miss the most important warning signs: high blood glucose and ketones in your urine. Test your urine for ketones whenever your blood glucose is over 300 mg/dl or you feel ill. Signs of DKA include the following:
    • High blood glucose above 240 mg/dl and not falling
    • Classic signs of hyperglycemia: intense thirst, dry mouth, need to urinate frequently
    • Lack of appetite or pains in your stomach
    • Vomiting or nausea
    • Blurry vision
    • Fever or warm, dry, or flushed skin
    • Difficulty breathing
    • Feeling of weakness
    • Sleepiness
    • A fruity odor on your breath
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Healthcare, answered
    I had this problem for a six week period in my life when I was training for the Race Across America in 2007. I could wake up with a blood sugar of 80, and the second I got moving or put anything into my body – if I drank a cup of coffee – my blood sugar would be 200. It was extremely frustrating. I was doing a lot of insulin to compensate for anything I ate in the morning. It’s about working with the doctor to find out how much you need to increase your basal rate from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m. to get the metabolism moving faster so the dawn phenomenon is less problematic. When I was having the dawn phenomenon I was averaging 22 hours a week on a bike, and it was a lot of intensity. I kept making adjustments until I go it right.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    People who have diabetes may become suddenly ill because there is too much or too little sugar in their blood.
  • 3 Answers
    A
    People with diabetes have a higher-than-average risk of having a heart attack or stroke. These strike people with diabetes more than twice as often as people without diabetes.

    There's a big link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. In fact, two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke, also called cardiovascular disease. Clogged blood vessels can lead to heart attack, stroke, and other problems.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Sex is an important part of life and relationships. But diabetes can affect a man's sex life. It is important to understand that there is not just one reason a man with diabetes might be experiencing sexual health issues. 
    • Erectile Dysfunction: Don't be afraid to talk with your doctor about impotence, also called erectile dysfunction or ED.
    • Low Testosterone: Take the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire to assess your likelihood of having low testosterone, which often goes undiagnosed.
    • Sexual Implications of Emotional Health: Discuss feelings of stress, anxiety and sexual dysfunction with your healthcare team.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Some men with diabetes have impotence, also called erectile dysfunction or ED. Erectile dysfunction is when a man can no longer have or keep an erection. It's not easy to accept that you have ED. And it can be even harder to talk about it. Talking about ED is the only way to learn about treatments and get the help you need. It's normal to feel embarrassed discussing such an intimate and personal issue, but your health care provider is a professional who is there to help you, not judge you.
    • Explain to your health care provider the symptoms you have been experiencing
    • Tell your health care provider your concerns and ask him if it could be ED or another sexual disorder
    • Inform your health care provider of any other emotional or physical changes you have experienced
    • Review with your health care provider any medications you may be taking which may be causing these symptoms
    • Ask your health care provider about treatment options and which he recommends to fit your needs
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Some men with diabetes have impotence, also called erectile dysfunction or ED. Erectile dysfunction is when a man can no longer have or keep an erection. ED treatment options include:
    • Taking prescription pills
    • Putting medicine called prostaglandins into your penis
    • Using a vacuum tube and pump to draw blood into the penis
    • Surgery to put a device in the penis or to fix blood vessels so more blood will flow to the penis