What is apraxia?

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Apraxia is a neurological disorder that makes people unable to carry out familiar movements when asked to do so. People with apraxia understand what they are being asked to do, and are willing to do it, but cannot physically perform the task, despite being strong enough to do so.
The inability to perform basic motor skills such as walking, dressing, and eating a meal is known as apraxia. This is quite different from weakness or paralysis caused by a stroke. A person with apraxia has literally forgotten how to perform these activities. Usually, apraxia develops gradually, but in some cases, it begins abruptly. Apraxia may first be evident in fine hand movements, showing up in illegible handwriting and clumsiness in buttoning clothing. Everyday skills like dressing, using a phone or switching channels on a TV set may disappear. Eventually the ability to chew, walk, or sit up in a chair is lost.

Apraxia (called "dyspraxia" if mild) is a neurological disorder characterized by the loss of the ability to execute or carry out skilled movements and gestures, despite having the desire and the physical ability to perform them. Apraxia results from dysfunction of the cerebral hemispheres of the brain, especially the parietal lobe, and can arise from many diseases or damage to the brain.

There are several kinds of apraxia, which may occur alone or together. The most common is buccofacial or orofacial apraxia, which causes the inability to perform facial movements, such as licking lips, whistling, coughing, or winking. Other types of apraxia include limb-kinetic apraxia (the inability to make fine, precise movements with an arm or leg); ideomotor apraxia (the inability to make the proper movement in response to a verbal command); ideational apraxia (the inability to coordinate activities with multiple, sequential movements, such as dressing, eating, and bathing); verbal apraxia (difficulty coordinating mouth and speech movements); constructional apraxia (the inability to copy, draw, or construct simple figures); and oculomotor apraxia (difficulty moving the eyes on command). Apraxia may be accompanied by a language disorder called aphasia. Degeneration of the corticobasal ganglionic causes various types of apraxia, especially in the elderly.

This answer is based on source information from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

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