Developmental Disorders

Developmental Disorders

Developmental Disorders
When a child is born with a developmental disability, sometimes called a birth defect, it means there is a chronic condition that will be a life-long challenge. Down syndrome; autism; and language, learning, vision or hearing problems are a few developmental disabilities. While these disabilities are typically present at birth, they can begin at any time up to age 22.

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    It may be possible to prevent dyspraxia in your child by avoiding smoking, drugs, and alcohol during pregnancy. Learning disabilities also run in families, which indicate that there may be a genetic link. If it's genetic, the condition may be difficult to prevent.

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    Symptoms of dyspraxia vary with age. Delays in developmental milestones and neurological problems, such as lack of coordination, are some noticeable difficulties in children. A classroom environment is where the learning disability beings to stand out. Problems in reading, writing or math are usually noticeable in children between the ages of five and eleven.

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    Dyspraxia first develops during childhood. This learning disability involves a delay in the development of children's motor skills. If left untreated, this lack of development can lead to problems as an adult. Therapy, medication, and learning different ways to adapt can help diminish the affects of a learning disability as the child gets older.

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    Managing dyspraxia on a daily basis starts with creating a plan to get the right help. Educational and medical help may be needed. Special education programs at school with a specialist can help assess strengths and weaknesses and work with them. Medications are available that can temporarily improve children's attention and help them focus. These medications need to be taken daily, preferably during school hours, to be effective.

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    Having dyspraxia learning disabilities requires some lifestyle changes. It's important to work with a specialist either in school or outside of school, since these specialists can help you address and identify strengths and weakness. Taking prescribed medication as indicated by your doctor can help improve attention and focus. Therapy and counseling sessions for the entire family is a lifestyle change that can help people with dyspraxia.

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    The fact that learning disabilities like dyspraxia run in families indicates that there may be a genetic link. A parent's learning disability may be different than the child's. The learning disability is not a specific inherited disorder but more of a subtle brain dysfunction that leads to a learning disorder. In some cases, learning difficulties may originate from the family's environment.

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    There is no one single cause related to dyspraxia. Research has shown that the causes are diverse and complex and do not stem from a single specific source. A leading theory is that learning disabilities, like dyspraxia, come from subtle disturbances in the structure and function of the brain.

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    Dyspraxia may not be diagnosed immediately. Parents may notice that developmental milestones (crawling, sitting up, or walking) are significantly delayed, which can be an early indicator of dyspraxia. However, the classroom teacher may be the first to notice a child's continuing difficulties. The affected child often falls behind the rest of the class in reading, writing, and mathematics. Standardized tests comparing a child's skill level to what is considered normal may be used for an accurate diagnosis.

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    If a parent or teacher suspects that a child has a dyspraxia learning disability, an appointment with a learning specialist can help with a diagnosis. The specialist can explain terms that can help the parents understand the disability and can make recommendations for treatment. Being prepared with observations of the child's behavior and being able to identify what they can or cannot do may assist the specialist in planning a treatment program. Providing information about any family history of learning disorders will also assist the specialist in treatment.

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    The ABC Movement Assessment Battery was developed to assess poor movement skills in children, and it is sometimes used to diagnose dyspraxia. The test has two parts. The first part is completed by an adult who is familiar with the child and can answer questions about movements associated with activities. The second part has tests that involve balance ability, throwing balls, and writing skills.