Corns, Calluses & Bunions

Corns, Calluses & Bunions

Our hands and feet take a lot of abuse. We don't wear gloves for yard work; shoes don't fit well. The irritation causes skin to harden, or get flaky and dry - resulting in painful corns, calluses, and bunions. Over-the-counter products can help. If you have diabetes, don't ever ignore any signs of these irritations - as they can develop into very serious conditions. An infection or ulcer needs medical treatment.

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    A , Podiatric Medicine, answered
    The usual culprit of calluses and corns is a poorly fitting shoe, but some people have inherited bone structure or gait patterns that make them more susceptible. Injuries that damage the bone structure may also lead to the development of corns and calluses.
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    A , Orthopedic Surgery, answered
    Symptoms of corns and calluses include:
    • Hard, dead layer of skin
    • Pain
    • Hard, dead layer of skin, usually around the toes
    • Sometimes a dense knot of skin in the center of the hardened area
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    If you have bunions, there's only one indication of whether it needs to be operated on: pain. If you don't have pain, no operation is needed. 

    Fixing a bunion requires shaving off a bit of the splayed-out bone, cutting the bone below the bunion and pushing in the splayed-out bone to straighten the toe. This is not an operation you pop back on. Feet are critically important to your well-being.
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    A callus is usually not dangerous or painful. If it does begin to hurt, it may be overlying a nerve, or it may be a sign of an anatomical problem. For example, people with bunions on their feet usually form deposits of dead tissue there to cushion the protruding bone at the edge of the foot near the big toe. Hence, the callus is covering and padding the real problem. In a case like this, I advise seeing a podiatrist or an orthopedic surgeon. A dermatologist can pare down the top layers of a callus with a surgical blade, but it will return if the same action or friction on the area is repeated or if an underlying medical problem remains. I would trust a doctor, but not a nail technician, to perform this simple procedure, and do not try it yourself since it is easy to cut too far and hit living tissue.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Most bunion procedures involve removing the bony bump on the inside of the big toe. Sometimes, the doctor will also cut or remove other segments of the big toe's metatarsal bone in order to realign the metatarsal-phalangeal joint and decrease the angle of the big toe relative to the second toe. This makes for a more involved procedure—which is not without risk—but it also reduces the chances of recurrence.

    Occasionally people think a bunion has come back when the big toe has only drifted slightly toward the second one. Age, weight gain, arthritis, and other factors can loosen up the capsule that normally holds the metatarsal-phalangeal joint in place.

    I recommend having surgery again for bunions only if the patient is having a significant amount of pain and discomfort in the foot during everyday activities. A second operation can help correct any laxity problems of the metatarsal-phalangeal joint and capsule, and, if necessary, fix the joint's alignment.
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    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    The cause of bunions is inflammation of the tissue or bone at the joint of your big toe. A bunion causes a bulge at the base of your big toe. This bulge protrudes outward, and the deformity can cause your big toe to turn inward. It’s a hereditary condition, but poorly fitting shoes can be a factor.
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    A Foot & Ankle Surgery, answered on behalf of
    What Should I Think about if I Have Bunion Surgery?
    Bunion surgery can be painful, says Holman Chan, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he describes various types of surgery for bunions and why they can be painful for the patient. 
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Considering all the other life-threatening health problems we tend to worry about, it may seem that digestive distress ranks somewhere between canker sores and bunions in the pecking order of age-related problems. But the truth is that there's a whole world inside your gut (quite literally, depending on what you eat) that influences how you age. When you eat too much and engage in excessive calorie consumption, you don't allow the ultimate antiager—calorie restriction—to give you the benefits of longevity.
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    A , Podiatric Medicine, answered
    Bunions are among the most common causes of painful toes. They plague more than half of all American women, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, but only a quarter of men. They are twice as common among people over age 60 compared with younger adults.
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    A , Podiatric Medicine, answered
    You may be able to prevent bunions and bunionettes from developing -- or keep them from getting worse -- by wearing shoes that provide sufficient room in the toe boxes. Look for shoes with blunt toes rather than pointy ones, and allow for about a quarter-inch to a half-inch of space between your longest toe and the front of the shoe.