Corns, Calluses & Bunions

Corns, Calluses & Bunions

Our hands and feet take a lot of abuse. We don't wear gloves for yard work; shoes don't fit well. The irritation causes skin to harden, or get flaky and dry - resulting in painful corns, calluses, and bunions. Over-the-counter products can help. If you have diabetes, don't ever ignore any signs of these irritations - as they can develop into very serious conditions. An infection or ulcer needs medical treatment.

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  • 2 Answers
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    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    In order to diagnose a bunion, the doctor will examine your foot. Weight-bearing x-rays can be helpful in determining the integrity of the joints of the foot and to screen for underlying conditions. 
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Orthopedic Surgery, answered
    During recovery from bunion surgery, you may have to wear a bandage and special shoe -- or possibly a cast in more severe cases. The special shoe or cast will protect your foot, allowing it to heal, while enabling you to walk on your heel. During recovery, your muscles and other soft tissues will atrophy, so after the postoperative shoe or cast is removed, you may have to do exercises to regain your strength and flexibility. It may take as long as six months to recover fully (to the point where you can do strenuous activities).
  • 5 Answers
    A
    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of

    Bunions may be treated conservatively with changes in shoe wear, orthotics and anti-inflammatory medications. However, these treatments address symptoms rather than correct the actual deformity. Surgery is elective yet may be necessary to resolve symptoms.

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  • 1 Answer
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    A Podiatric Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Is There a Shaving Process During Bunion Surgery?
    You’re really realigning joints and tendons during bunion surgery -- not just shaving the bone, according to Conan Parke, DPM, from MountainView Hospital. Watch this video to learn about bunion surgery.
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    Avoiding poorly fit shoes is the best way to reduce the chance of a corn or callus. To remove a corn or callus, carefully shave the excess tissue with a clean implement. Use an emery board or file or a commercial corn or callus remover in liquid or plaster form.

    If there is no relief from the self-help tips or the corn or callus is extremely painful or large, check with a primary care doctor or a podiatrist (foot doctor). There are easy ways to treat or remove a corn or callus in a medical setting that can provide quick relief.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Orthopedic Surgery, answered
    Many people have calluses or corns. They appear as areas of hardened, sometimes yellow skin on pressure points or around bony areas of the foot. Calluses and corns develop to protect the foot from damage.
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    Corns are yellowish thickening of the skin that form on top of the toes where the toe rubs against a shoe or another toe.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    Dr. Donnica Moore - How can I treat a callus myself?

    You can treat a callus using a licorice stick! In this video, women's health expert Dr. Donnica Moore explains how this candy can used to remove calluses.


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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Orthopedic Surgery, answered
    Symptoms of corns and calluses include:
    • Hard, dead layer of skin
    • Pain
    • Hard, dead layer of skin, usually around the toes
    • Sometimes a dense knot of skin in the center of the hardened area
  • 1 Answer
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    Depending on the severity of the condition, bunions may be treated with surgery to remove the bony enlargement, while wearing wider shoes and/or non-medicated pads for comfort may be all that’s needed.

    The type of surgical procedure performed depends upon the severity of the bunion, the individual’s age, general health, activity level, and the condition of the bones and connective tissue. Reasons to undergo bunion surgery may include severe foot pain that occurs even when walking or wearing flat, comfortable shoes. Surgery may also be indicated when chronic big toe inflammation and swelling does not subside with rest or medications.

     

    You can expect a significant amount of healing time after surgery - about 8 to 12 weeks before resuming normal activity. Swelling can last up to a year.