Corns, Calluses & Bunions

Corns, Calluses & Bunions

Our hands and feet take a lot of abuse. We don't wear gloves for yard work; shoes don't fit well. The irritation causes skin to harden, or get flaky and dry - resulting in painful corns, calluses, and bunions. Over-the-counter products can help. If you have diabetes, don't ever ignore any signs of these irritations - as they can develop into very serious conditions. An infection or ulcer needs medical treatment.

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    If you have a bunion, your doctor may prescribe medication to relieve your pain. This may include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), like aspirin or ibuprofen (for example, Advil or Motrin). Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is another common pain reliever that can help with bunion pain. Sometimes, injections of pain relievers, anti-inflammatory drugs or cortisone may also be recommended for pain and swelling. If you have surgery for your bunions, your doctor may prescribe a stronger prescription pain medication.
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    A Podiatric Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Is There a Shaving Process During Bunion Surgery?
    You’re really realigning joints and tendons during bunion surgery -- not just shaving the bone, according to Conan Parke, DPM, from MountainView Hospital. Watch this video to learn about bunion surgery.
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    A bunion is a bony bump on the inner side of your foot, at the base of your big (first) toe. It causes your big toe to turn inward, toward your other toes, and it can cause foot pain and stiffness. If a shoe or something else rubs or presses on the bunion often, it may become swollen, tender and red. Bunion treatment usually includes avoiding things that rub against the bunion, icing it and taking pain medication. Foot stretches and exercises may also help, and some people may need to wear a brace when they sleep. Some people may need bunion surgery.

    Do you ever need to call your doctor about a bunion? Sometimes! Call your doc if your symptoms get worse or don't get better after two weeks of treatment, or if you have new symptoms. If you've had bunion surgery, and have any of these symptoms, call your doctor right away:
    • Fever or chills
    • Pain that gets worse
    • Redness, swelling or warmth in the area
    • Fluid or pus that drains from the area
    • Loose or wet bandages
    • Bleeding
    • Side effects from medications
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    It’s true, a family history of bunions or arthritis can raise your risk for this condition. But there are a few things you can do to lower your risk. First, wear wide-toed shoes that fit your feet. Shoes that are too narrow, pointy or tight can push your big toe inward, causing a bunion to form. It's also best to avoid high heels. Other steps you can take to prevent this painful bump include doing exercises to keep your feet and ankles flexible and strong. Wearing a small pad between your big toe and second toe (to keep your big toe from turning in) may help, too. 
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    A bunion is an enlargement of the bone or tissue around a joint at the base of the big toe due to a structural deformity. It forms when the normal balance and stability of the joint is disrupted - from conditions like pronation, flat feet or arthritis - and the toe pulls inward, creating a “bump” on the outside. Tight, ill-fitting shoes don’t cause bunions, but they can aggravate them by causing pain, redness and swelling.

     

    Depending on the severity of the condition, bunions may be treated with surgery to remove the bony enlargement, while wearing wider shoes and/or non-medicated pads for comfort may be all that’s needed.

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    Bunions look like a “bump” on the outside of your foot at the base of the big toe. Tight, ill-fitting shoes don’t cause bunions, but they can aggravate them by causing pain, redness and swelling. Some people find relief by wearing wider shoes, while others may need surgery. If you suspect you have a bunion, see your doctor or podiatrist for treatment advice.

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    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    What Causes Bunions?
    Learn about bunions and what causes them. Watch this video with Paul Switaj, MD from Reston Hospital Center.
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    A , Podiatric Medicine, answered
    Bunions are among the most common causes of painful toes. They plague more than half of all American women, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, but only a quarter of men. They are twice as common among people over age 60 compared with younger adults.
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    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    In order to diagnose a bunion, the doctor will examine your foot. Weight-bearing x-rays can be helpful in determining the integrity of the joints of the foot and to screen for underlying conditions. 
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    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of

    Bunions may be treated conservatively with changes in shoe wear, orthotics and anti-inflammatory medications. However, these treatments address symptoms rather than correct the actual deformity. Surgery is elective yet may be necessary to resolve symptoms.

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