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What is the ejection fraction?

Scripps Health
Allergy
A cardiac ejection fraction (EF) refers to the percentage of blood pumped from the heart’s main chamber during each heartbeat. It is measured by an echocardiogram or ultrasound of the heart muscle.
Ejection fraction (EF) is the amount of blood that enters the heart and is pumped out, says Robert Fishel, MD, director of cardiac electrophysiology at JFK Medical Center. In this video, he explains what EF tells doctors about the heart.
What is the ejection fraction?

The ejection fraction is a measure of how well the heart is pumping blood. The measurement describes the percent of blood inside the ventricle chamber that is pumped into the body with each heartbeat. A healthy ejection fraction is 55 to 60 percent of the blood inside the ventricle. This measurement is often taken during an echocardiogram, a test that uses sound waves to make an image of the heart.

Ejection fraction is the amount of blood released during each contraction of the lower ventricle of the heart. It is usually expressed as a percentage: an ejection fraction of 60% means that 60% of the total amount of blood in the left ventricle is expelled with each heartbeat.
Richard L. Weiss, MD
Allergy

The amount of blood that is pumped out by the heart in one beat is called the ejection fraction.
An ejection fraction reflects the strength of the heart muscle. The normal ejection fraction for the left ventricle is 50% to 60%. The heart muscle may be weakened from a heart attack, heart failure, or an infection. Any weakening of the heart muscle may lower the ejection fraction.

 

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Healthy Circulatory System

Healthy Circulatory System

The circulatory system is the body's superhighway, comprised of an intricate network of vessels that carry blood to and from all areas of your body. At the core is your heart, which pumps nutrient and oxygen-rich blood to organs s...

o that they can function normally. Cardiovascular exercise and staying well-hydrated are just two ways to help promote good circulation. Learn more about maintaining a healthy circulatory system with expert advice from Sharecare.
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