Choosing The Right Sunscreen

Choosing The Right Sunscreen

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Sensitive skin sunscreen formulas generally won't irritate the skin as much as regular lotions. For more breakout defense, look for light, noncomedogenic (nonclogging) sunscreens.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Some sunscreens stay on in the water better than others, but no sunscreen is truly waterproof, so it's important to get out of the water and reapply if you are swimming for long periods no matter which sunscreen you use.

    In 2011 The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced it was banning the use of the term “waterproof” by sunscreen manufacturers. According to the FDA, the terms "waterproof" and "sweat proof" are misleading because sunscreens resist the water only for a limited period of time. Eventually, they all wash off. Sunscreen labels must indicate how long (usually 40 or 80 minutes) the product remains effective in water as confirmed by standardized lab tests.


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    Sunscreens are rated by their SPF -- sun protective factor. SPF measures the amount of time it takes for sun-exposed skin to redden. If you normally burn in 10 minutes, a sunscreen with SPF 15 would protect you 15 times as long, or 150 minutes, assuming you don't sweat or get wet. But that equation changes at SPFs above 30. A sunscreen with SPF 50 blocks only about 1.3 percent more UVB rays than SPF 30, according to the Environmental Working Group. Using SPF 15 should be sufficient, as long as you are sure to reapply within the proper amount of time.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    A broad-spectrum body lotion with an SPF of 15 is better than nothing but not as protective as the broad-spectrum sunblock (with the harder-core sunscreens and blockers) that you might wear poolside. Most daily moisturizers with SPF add one or two chemical sunscreens and maybe one chemical UVA blocker (remember that SPF only measures protection from UVB rays). Usually that chemical sunscreen is benzophone 3 or oxybenzone, which guards only against short UVA wavelengths. If you're going to be spending time in direct sunlight (not just a day at the beach but a ride in a convertible or lunch at an outdoor café), opt for a broad-spectrum product that contains chemical UVB absorbers and either physical blockers (titanium dioxide or zinc oxide) or chemical UVA protectors like Mexoryl or avobenzone that prevent longer wavelengths from reaching the dermis. 
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    A answered

    The following are six tips for sunscreen use.

    • If you’re dark-skinned, choose chemical sunscreens over zinc and titanium formulas, as the mineral-based ones may give you a whitish hue.
    • If a sunscreen makes your skin sting, itch, or break out, the likely culprits are PABA, benzophenone-3, or octyl methoxycinnamate; switch to a formula without those ingredients. If you are sensitive to any of these chemicals, switch to any of the zinc oxide or titanium dioxide varieties.
    • Apply indoors, about 30 minutes before you go out in the sun.
    • Ignore promises of “all-day protection” and “water-resistant,” they are not reliable. Reapply all sunscreens at least every two to three hours and right after you’ve been sweating a lot or swimming.
    • There’s an expiration date on sunscreens. Check it and toss old ones (most last up to two years).
    • Don’t store sunscreens in the glove compartment of your car -- heat degrades them.

    From The Mind-Beauty Connection: 9 Days to Less Stress, Gorgeous Skin, and a Whole New You by Amy Wechsler.

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    A , Dermatology, answered

    Dermatologists recommend lip balms containing an SPF of at least 30 to be applied to the lips daily. This is important because the lips are exposed to sun light leaving them vulnerable to the development of skin cancer. Many lipsticks and glosses have SPF in them making these an excellent choice for daily usage.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Tanning lotions with DHA have proven effective for the most part, because they don't require users to expose their skin to the sun's harmful rays in order to get a tan. As with any topical product It's possible, however, to experience adverse effects from sunless tanners, including rashes and other allergic reactions.

     

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    No skin care routine is complete without sunscreen. I have my personal bias as I have been plagued throughout my life with oily skin. While I have found that there are innumerable sunscreens on the market labeled as oil-free, or lightweight, none were equal to the challenge of my skin. Look for those containing oil-reducing polymers which soak up only the excessive skin oils. They mattify without leaving your skin dry or irritated (meaning they are ideal for any and all skin types). And make certain your sun protection is labeled broad spectrum (ultraviolet-A [UVA] and ultraviolet-B [UVB]), and use a minimum of sun protection factor (SPF) 30.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Dr. Ellen Marmur - What does the broad-spectrum sun block label mean?
    Sunscreen labels can be confusing. In this video, dermatologist Dr. Ellen Marmur defines tricky terms like "broad-spectrum" and "sunblock."
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Water resistant sunscreens are just as good. I think they got a little bit stricter with labels for water resistant because people, again, were not reapplying. In general, a lot of the water resistant sunscreens can give you about 60-80 minutes in the water. What you have to look for in those products, because they are water resistant, they tend to feel a little more greasy and ointment based. They work just as well, but the cosmetic feeling might not be as appealing to the consumer.