Carbohydrates and Health

Carbohydrates and Health

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  • 1 Answer
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    A Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered on behalf of
    To achieve better health, you should reduce your consumption of simple carbs. These include starches in bread, pasta, rice and potatoes or high-fructose corn syrup, and other caloric sweeteners in prepared and processed foods. People with higher intakes of simple carbs are more likely to have lower levels of HDL (good) cholesterol and higher levels of triglycerides (blood fats).
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    A answered
    Foods with a low glycemic load (GL) of 10 or less include:
    • broccoli, 1/2 cup: 0
    • cauliflower, 1 cup: 0
    • green beans, raw, 1 cup: 0
    • spinach, 1 cup: 0
    • almonds, 1/3 cup (1.5 ounces): 0
    • peanuts, 1/3 cup (1.5 ounces): 1
    • plum, 1 average: 2
    • Nutella spread, 2 tablespoons: 2
    • carrots, 1 large: 3
    • cherries, about 16 (4 ounces): 3
    • cashews, 1/4 cup (1 ounce): 3
    • peas, frozen, 1/2 cup: 3
    • pear, 1 small: 4
    • mixed nuts, roasted, 1/3 cup (1.5 ounces): 4
    • skim milk, 1 cup (8 ounces): 4
    • soy milk, 1 cup (8 ounces): 4
    • strawberries, 1 cup: 4
    • tomato juice, 6 ounces: 4
    • lentils, 1 cup: 5
    • orange, 1 small: 5
    • peach, 1 small: 5
    • apple, 1 small: 6
    • wheat tortillas, 2 (6-inch): 6
    • yogurt, plain, 1 cup: 6
    • ice cream (regular), 1/2 cup: 6
    • navy beans, 1 cup: 7
    • lima beans, 1 cup: 7
    • grapes, 1 cup: 7
    • cantaloupe, 1 cup: 8
    • popcorn, 2 cups: 8
    • apple juice, 6 ounces: 8
    • graham crackers, 2 squares: 8
    • whole-grain pumpernickel bread, 2 slices: 10
    • oatmeal (instant), 1 ounce (1 cup prepared): 10
    The glycemic load applies the glycemic index to a standard serving of food. Seafood, poultry and meats do not have a glycemic load because they do not contain carbohydrates.
  • 3 Answers
    A
    A , Orthopedic Surgery, answered
    Contrary to popular diets, carbohydrates (carbs) are not the enemy. The cells of your body use circulating glucose to make energy at rest and during exercise. Not only do your cells need carbohydrates but your brain is entirely dependent on carbs for energy. Carbs help maintain blood glucose during exercise and restore muscle glycogen during rest and recovery from exercise.


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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Administration, answered

    Carbohydrates provide the most direct energy to our cells. They can be simple (as in sugars) or complex (as in vegetables and grains) and are readily broken down into glucose, the energy for our cells. Whole-carbohydrate foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are also good sources of fiber; refined carbohydrates in products made with white flour or white sugar, such as cookies, crackers, bagels, or pasta, do not contain fiber. They do, however, provide quick sources of concentrated energy.

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    A
    A Fitness, answered on behalf of

    Carbohydrates are pure energy foods that you continually use to keep your body alive and in motion. Protein is used primarily to maintain structures that already exist, and therefore very little is needed. A 150LB person doesn't need any more than 100gms of protein unless they are in heavy training and/or dieting, at which point they may need to go as high as 1gm of protein per pound of body weight. As an example, 150gms of protein is 1/3LB and no one can put on that much new muscle every day (that would be almost 2lbs/wk for the rest of your life) but an active 150LB person will use 400-500gms of carbohydrates daily to support normal energy needs.

  • 1 Answer
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    Glycogen refers to the state that carbohydrates take when they are in storage within your body. When you consume carbohydrates, your body will use the amount that it needs. Your body will store the surplus carbohydrates in your muscles and liver. The carbohydrates in storage are called glycogen and are often used by the muscles during exercise. The amount of glycogen stored in your muscles is enough to provide energy for an entire day.

  • 2 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Refined grains like white flour and white rice are digested quickly and rapidly increase the amount of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream. This spike in blood sugar triggers a surge of insulin to help cells use this nutrient. As glucose is metabolized, blood sugar plummets, making you want to eat again. This "blood sugar roller coaster" boosts triglycerides, lowers helpful high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and increases the risk for heart attack in people who are overweight. Whole grains, on the other hand, take longer to digest and tend to be low on the glycemic index; they cause blood sugar levels to rise and fall more slowly. As a result, you will feel full longer while obtaining more nutrients. Aim for six or more servings of healthy grains per day.
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  • 3 Answers
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of

    Your body is like a machine and it needs fuel. Carbohydrates give your body the “fuel” or energy it needs to continue working. Thus, carbohydrates are not evil. They can be healthy to eat. There are three things to keep in mind, however.

    • Carbohydrates are part of a healthy diet. A healthy diet is a balanced diet that includes foods from all food groups: vegetables, fruits, grains, dairy, protein, and healthy fats/oils.
    • Though carbohydrates are found in different food groups (vegetables, starchy vegetables/starches, fruits, milk, and grains), not all carbohydrates are equal. Simple carbohydrates include sugars that are added during food processing and refining. Limit or avoid these added sugars since they come with few nutrients and little to no fiber. Complex carbohydrates, however, give your body’s digestive system some work to do. Your body must break through the starch and dietary fiber in order to get the glucose, or sugar, it needs from the food. Thus, a healthy diet will include carbohydrate sources that are high in fiber and nutrients, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. 
    • Eat the right portion of your carbohydrate-containing food (and every food for that matter). A portion is the amount of each type of food on your plate. A great rule of thumb is to devote half of your plate to non-starchy vegetables and fruit, one-fourth to protein, and one-fourth to starchy carbohydrates (beans, peas, corn, squash, and grains). Add a glass of low fat milk or a cup of yogurt to your meal.
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  • 10 Answers
    A
    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    If you eat too many carbs and do not exercise to burn off the extra calories, carbohydrates can cause weight gain. For weight loss, limit carb intake to approximately four servings a day. Make at least half whole grain.
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    A answered
    Experts say that Americans are consuming too many refined carbohydrates, meaning too much white flour and sugar. When you reduce the number of servings of refined carbohydrates and replace them with the appropriate number of servings of whole grain carbohydrates, you may experience a drop in your triglyceride level and an improvement in your HDL or “good” cholesterol level. You may also experience weight loss, specifically in your waist, which can help to reduce your risk of insulin resistance. Limiting the amount of refined carbohydrates you eat can also help to lower your blood pressure since many refined grains contain large amounts of sodium or salt in their recipes. Whole grains also support heart health and digestive health thanks to their fiber content. And whole grains are bursting with nutrients, including vitamins and minerals. A single serving size of whole grains should translate to roughly 80 calories, whether it’s a slice of bread or a portion size of pasta, rice, potatoes, other grains, and even corn or peas, which, though vegetables, are considered “bread-like.”