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What is dual protection in the context of sexual intercourse?

Dual protection is defined as the simultaneous prevention of a sexually transmitted infection and unwanted pregnancy. This can be accomplished by the consistent use of condoms alone or by the simultaneous use of two methods at once, one of which must be condoms. Avoiding penetrative sex (penis-in-vagina intercourse) is another means of achieving dual protection. So, too, is being in a monogamous relationship in which both partners are free of STIs and at least one partner is using effective contraception. While injectable and implantable hormones, the Pill, IUDs, and sterilization are highly effective for pregnancy prevention, they do not provide protection against STIs, including HIV/AIDS. Using two methods simultaneously can also increase the effectiveness of your birth control method. For example, if you are using both the Pill and condoms correctly and consistently, your method is as close to 100 percent effective in preventing pregnancy as you can get without using a permanent method, such as sterilization. Many couples begin by using condoms, but after a period of time, when they feel that they trust each other, they stop using condoms. Unfortunately, trust has little to do with whether a partner is already carrying an STI. If either you or your partner has ever been with another partner, there is a possibility that one of you may be carrying an STI. It is best to continue to use dual protection until you have both been tested.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: A New Edition for a New Era

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Our Bodies, Ourselves: A New Edition for a New Era

America's best-selling book on all aspects of women's health With more than four million copies sold, "Our Bodies, Ourselves" is "the" classic resource that women of all ages can turn to for...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.