Birth Control Pill

Birth Control Pill

Birth Control Pill
Birth control pills contain estrogen and progesterone to suppress ovulation and prevent pregnancy. Common side effects include bleeding between periods, nausea, weight gain, breast tenderness, mood changes and mild headaches. The birth control pill is one of the most popular and effective contraceptive methods available. When taken correctly -- at the same time every day -- they are 99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Birth control pills may raise your blood glucose levels. Using them for longer than a year or two may also increase your risk of complications. For instance, if you develop high blood pressure, a possible side effect of birth control pills, you also increase the chance that your diabetes-related eye or kidney disease will worsen.

     

  • 4 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - who should not take pill
    While the Pill can be an ideal choice for many women, it can be dangerous for certain women. In this video, gynecologic oncologist Dr. Judith Wolfe tells Dr. Oz who should steer clear. 
    See All 4 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Estrogen and progestin, two hormones in conventional birth-control pills, inhibit ovulation, the monthly occurrence where a woman’s ovaries release an egg. Common side effects include spotting or bleeding between periods, nausea, weight gain from fluid retention, breast tenderness, mood changes, and mild headaches. Progestin-only pills, also called mini-pills, make the uterine lining thinner and the cervical mucus thicker so sperm cannot reach an egg. These pills avoid the side effects of using estrogen and have a high failure rate because they must be taken at the same time every day.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - pill prevents cancer

    Studies show that taking the birth control pill can lower your risk of ovarian and uterine cancer. In this video, gynecologic oncologist Dr. Judith Wolfe tells Dr. Oz how the Pill works to prevent cancer.



  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - does pill gain weight

    Lots of women suspect that the pill makes them put on weight, but studies show something different, gynecologic oncologist Dr. Judith Wolfe tells Dr. Oz. In this video, she explains what's behind the weight gain that women blame on the Pill.


    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Nursing, answered

    Women using birth control pills can expect lighter periods, and sometimes no periods at all- since the hormones in it can really thin out the lining of the uterus. This can even occur with normal pill pack use including the placebo week, not just with extending cycles or doubling up the active pills in several pill packs which actually intends for periods to be avoided.

    Missing periods with normal use of birth control pills is called an 'absence of withdrawal bleeding' and is not usually considered abnormal or a concern, as long as there is no other cause for a missing period such as pregnancy.  This is also considered safe at this time.

    Some women enjoy this missing period effect, but others can find it nerve wracking though!

    If you have concerns, certainly talk to your health care provider for reassurance. Some women want their period each month to know they are not pregnant, and it may just take a revision in the Pill formula being used to promote that desired event each month.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    It may not work to its full potential! It is very important to keep taking birth control pills every day at the same time for them to work well. If you miss pills it may cause breakthrough bleeding and accidental pregnancies. If you miss one pill, you should take two the next day. If you miss more than two -- you should use back up method and consider using emergency contraception. There are pill reminder mobile applications which can help you not to miss a pill! 
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Rarely, birth-control pills have been associated with several eye conditions involving the blood vessels of the eye. However, there is no proof of a direct link between birth-control pills and eye disease in most women, and the risk of eye problems appears to be very low. Whatever risk there may be is increased by smoking and high blood pressure. There is no association between birth-control pills and myopia.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    It is very important for women to be educated about the birth contol pill so that they are able to base their contraceptive decision on facts, not myths and misinformation.  The majority of women, sixty one percent,  who participated in a nationwide survey felt that birth control pills caused weight gain.  However, not all birth control pills cause weight gain. An equal number of women tend to gain weight as lose weight while taking birth control pills.   Women concerned about weight loss or weight gain should talk with their health care professionals.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Women's Health, answered
    No, taking birth control pills during a pregnancy does not harm the baby or the mother. This information comes from large studies of women, many who did not know they were pregnant while taking pills.

    At the same time, the package insert for birth control pills says pregnant women should not take them and rates them as a class "X" medication for use in pregnancy. This can be confusing. The reason is that the class is determined by the benefit a medication provides during pregnancy measured against any possible harm it might cause. Since birth control pills don't provide any benefit to the pregnant women, they are automatically given an "X" classification. In this case, this should not be interpreted as possible danger to the pregnancy.
    See All 2 Answers