Birth Control Pill

Birth Control Pill

Birth Control Pill
Birth control pills contain estrogen and progesterone to suppress ovulation and prevent pregnancy. Common side effects include bleeding between periods, nausea, weight gain, breast tenderness, mood changes and mild headaches. The birth control pill is one of the most popular and effective contraceptive methods available. When taken correctly -- at the same time every day -- they are 99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

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    A Midwifery Nursing, answered on behalf of
    In order for a pregnancy to occur, an ovum (egg) must be released from the ovary, a process called ovulation. Pregnancy results when the egg travels through the tube and is exposed to sperm from the male. The release of the egg from the ovary results from a very specific hormonal pattern. By taking a birth control pill every day, a woman can change that hormonal pattern and prevent ovulation. No egg, no baby. The birth control pill is one of the most popular and effective contraceptive methods available.
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    Birth control pills contain reproductive hormones that influence the menstrual cycle in various ways depending on the type of pill you are taking. More traditional pills regulate your menstruation by mimicking a 28-day cycle. In recent years several pills have been developed that extend the cycle and reduce the number of periods you experience each year. Some types of birth control pills can actually eliminate periods for some women.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - how pill relieves menopause symptoms

    For many women, taking the Pill in their late 40s and early 50s can help relieve hot flashes and other unpleasant symptoms of perimenopause, gynecologist Dr. Carolyn Westhoff tells Dr. Oz. In this video, she explains how the birth control pill differs from hormone replacement therapy.


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    A Pulmonary Disease, answered on behalf of
    The Pill was the first medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for long-term use in healthy women, and it still functions as a go-to drug for many different clinical situations. The Pill works primarily through influencing estrogen and progesterone, the hormones that cycle in women naturally.

    There is a progesterone-only pill that works somewhat differently than the combined hormone pills and is an appropriate clinical choice for women unable to take estrogen.

    Estrogen stabilizes the uterine lining, reducing breakthrough bleeding and significantly reduces bleeding for each month that women are on the pill. Estrogen also inhibits the development of eggs and helps to prevent ovulation. This combination of effects helps treat menstrual disorders as well as provides contraception.

    Today, there are many different combinations of the amount of estrogen as well as the amount and type of progesterone available in different medications, including a combination transdermal patch and a removable vaginal ring.

     This content originally appeared on HCA Virginia Physicians Blog.
     
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    If you use birth-control pills, you should notify your doctor immediately if you notice:
    • Severe abdominal pain;
    • Severe chest pain or shortness of breath;
    • Severe leg pain, mostly in the calves;
    • Severe headaches;
    • Eye problems, such as blurred vision.
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    A , Nursing, answered
    Birth Control Methods
    The birth control pill may start to be effective after 5 days of taking it, however I would suggest that women continue to use condoms 100% of the time for safer sex and STD prevention ongoing and at least for the first month of starting the pill as a new user for several reasons.

    Unfortunately on average- most women on the pill miss, or takes late, at least 3 pills per package! This drastically reduces the protection against pregnancy.  The pill does not protect from HIV or Sexually Transmitted Infections {STD} so that is why we continue to urge women of ALL AGES to use Condoms for Safer Sex protection, at any age when entering new sexual relationships. 

    With a new pill user I’m especially concerned that they are not yet in a habit of taking the pill daily on time, so using back up is really wise for at least the first month, and ongoing for infection prevention.

    The birth control pill really does need some time to work and prevent pregnancy- and the best protection is achieved with perfect use- taking it every day at the same time. Most women likely benefit from using it for at least a full package or full month when a new user, to get optimal protection. 

    I hope that information helps, but certainly talk further with your GYN practitioner for specific advice in your personal situation as well!

    Birth Control Methods
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Irregular or changing periods are usually the first sign of perimenopause. Periods become more closely or widely spaced, and flow might change from light to very heavy or vice versa.

    You may have heard that taking birth control pills in later life can be dangerous. But as long as you’re free from major medical problems, low-dose birth control pills can be a successful way to regulate estrogen levels. They control mood swings plus protect against pregnancy. Believe it or not, perimenopausal women have the highest surprise pregnancy rates after teens.

     


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    There are no specific side effects to coming off the pill, though you may be aware of some changes in your body when you do stop using it.

    While on oral contraceptives, the natural menstrual cycle is replaced by cycles that are regulated by the hormones in the pill. Cycles produced by the pill tend to be more regular, lighter, and less crampy than natural cycles. When you stop the pill and return to your normal cycles, you may notice this difference.

    You can stop taking the pill suddenly without danger. However, if you stop in the middle of a cycle it is likely you will experience some irregular bleeding until the effects of the pill clear from your system. This may last a few weeks.

    In addition to providing effective protection from pregnancy, the pill offers other benefits. Many women on the pill have less acne, less severe PMS symptoms, and fewer ovarian cysts. These benefits are present only while the pill is being used. If any of these conditions are present before starting on the pill, they are likely to return when you stop taking the pill.
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    A , Women's Health, answered
    What is commonly called a "mini" pill is a birth control pill that contains only one of the female hormones, progesterone. The dose is very low. The steady state of progesterone thickens the mucus in the cervix, making it harder for the sperm to reach the fallopian tubes where fertilization must occur. In some women the progesterone only pill also stops ovulation. Because of the very low dose of hormone, the pill must be taken within the same three hour window each day to work effectively. And because the pill doesn't have estrogen, the United States Medical Eligibility Criteria says it may be used by women who have migraines or who have had blood clots. 

    You must get a prescription from your health care provider to obtain this pill.
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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered

    In the vast majority of patients, birth control pills will result in less bleeding, less menstrual cramping, and shorter periods.

    As a matter of fact, one can safely eliminate the periods for three months at a time by using what are known as extended cycle pills, where one only takes the active pills for 84 days and then either skips the pills altogether or uses the placebo (sugar) pills that contain no active ingredients for the next 7 days. 

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