Viral Oral Infections

Viral Oral Infections

Viral Oral Infections
Viral oral infections are virus that can affect the mouth and oral area. They include the herpes simplex virus, hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and in some cases, human papillomavirus or HPV. These viruses are usually very contagious and can cause painful oral sores, depending on the type of oral virus. In rare cases, mumps can spread through saliva causing swelling of the area around the mouth.

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    The most serious types of viral oral infections are those that do not leave the body completely after symptoms have dispersed. These viral oral infections are the most serious because they can produce symptoms at any time, meaning that you have to be on your guard against these painful symptoms all the time if you want to head them off with an antiviral medication. Also, these types of viral oral infections are the most serious because it s possible to pass them to other people even if you don't have symptoms.

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    Generally, viral oral infection treatment is not costly because many types of viral oral infections simply run their course without treatment. From time to time, however, people with viral oral infections do need treatment. However, this treatment is generally simple and consists only of some prescription drugs and creams. Only when viral oral infections become complicated or when you have an underlying condition that makes coping with the disease harder will more costly treatments, like hospital stays, be required.

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    Some types of viral oral infections heal within a few days and never return. Other types of viral oral infections (such as oral herpes) stick around in the body long after the symptoms are gone. These infections may present symptoms again at any time. In addition, people with these kinds of viral oral infections can be contagious even when they don't have symptoms. However, even people who don't have a re-occurring type of viral oral infection may be contagious for many days after the symptoms have been resolved.

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    Often, children practice worse hygiene than adults. For this reason, they've usually more likely to get viral infections of any kind. They may come into contact with viruses that other infected children have left on shared objects, and they probably don't wash their hands enough to rid themselves of these viruses. In addition, children with some types of viral oral infections are more likely to have symptoms of the virus.

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    AR. Tom Glass, DDS, Dentist, answered
    Yes, injuries can produce viral infections. The classic example of this is found with recurrent herpes infections of the lips. Once infected with herpes, it appears that the body "learns to live" with the virus.  If the lips are injured by excessive sunlight or physical trauma, the outer covering of the lip (epithelium) proliferates, making new DNA. It is at this point that the virus infects the cell and turns it into a virus making machine, ultimately killing the cell and causing the infection.
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    In most cases, you need to see a doctor if you're concerned about a viral oral infection. Although they occur in your mouth, viral oral infections aren't a problem of the teeth and gums, but rather of the immune system - they are the result of a virus's invasion. Doctors can prescribe antiviral medicines that can help you get rid of your symptoms faster, and they can help you assess whether other disorders you have may be complicating your viral oral infection. However, there are some instances in which you might want to consult a dentist about your viral oral infections. For instance, certain viral oral infections can lead to problems in dental work, so you'll want to let your dentist know you have this condition before you plan any procedures.

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    There are several different kinds of viral oral infections, but the one that most people have heard about is the herpes virus. Of the two kinds of herpes simplex viruses, HSV-1 causes most viral oral infections. Another viral oral infection that most people have heard of is chickenpox, a viral infection that can cause sores in the mouth. Hand, foot, and mouth disease is another viral oral infection that is quite common.

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    Like most viral infections, viral oral infections can have complications, though they are rare. People with compromised immune systems, for instance, can suffer from extreme viral infections like herpes that spread inside their body. In other cases, the sores produced by viral oral infections can affect facial nerves and cause lasting pain. Further infection of these sores by bacteria is also possible.

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    Viral infections do not respond to antibiotics, so they are not generally used to treat viral oral infections. Instead, a type of drug called an antiviral is prescribed to those who need to reduce symptoms quickly. Antiviral medications can't cure viral infections but they can help them run their course more quickly. In addition, they might reduce severe symptoms.

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    Viral oral infections can easily be passed from one person to another, and children are more likely than adults to have the symptoms of some viral oral infections. For this reason, it's important to tell your child's school about the viral oral infection or encourage your child to stay home until the symptoms have passed. In some cases, it is possible to spread the virus even after all the symptoms have gone, so you should consult your child's school about the best course of action. In any case, it's important to teach your child how to prevent spreading viral oral infections to other children.