Root Canal Therapy

Root Canal Therapy

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  • 6 Answers
    A

    Most of the time, a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort. By undergoing a root canal, you are "saving" your tooth. During root canal treatment, your dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in treating the insides of teeth) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed. If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed.

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  • 3 Answers
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    AHealthwise answered

    If you have an infected tooth, bacteria from the mouth can enter the bloodstream and cause infections in other parts of the body. People who have a hard time fighting off infections may need to take antibiotics before and after a root canal. Such people include those who have artificial heart valves or were born with heart defects.

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  • 5 Answers
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    Root canal treatment is necessary when the pulp (soft tissue inside your teeth containing blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue) becomes inflamed or diseased. If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed. The procedure can save your tooth and your smile.

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  • 1 Answer
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    If you've recently had a root canal and are experiencing pain, swelling, bleeding or other problems with your teeth, you should contact your dentist. Regular checkups- one to three- are also needed following the procedure. A root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort.
  • 4 Answers
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    During a root canal, your dentist will remove the diseased pulp from your tooth. Following that, your dentist will then clean and seal the pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth. They do this because if the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed. A root canal can help restore your tooth and your smile!
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  • 4 Answers
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    A root canal usually involves one or more visits to the dentist. Before treatment begins, your tooth will be numbed for comfort. Then the dentist will put a thin sheet of latex rubber over your tooth to keep the tooth dry. An opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber. The tooth's nerve or pulp is then removed from both the inside of the pulp chamber and the root canal--the space inside the root. Each root canal is cleaned and shaped so that it can be filled. Medicine may be placed in the pulp chamber and root canal to get rid of the bacteria.

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  • 5 Answers
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    A root canal procedure often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, your general dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in problems of the pulp) removes the diseased pulp (the soft tissue of a tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue). The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.

    Here's how your tooth is saved through treatment:

    1. First, an opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
    2. The pulp is then removed. The root canal(s) is cleaned and shaped to a form that can be filled.
    3. Medications may be put in the pulp chamber and root canal(s) to help get rid of germs and prevent infection.
    4. A temporary filling will be placed in the crown opening to protect the tooth between dental visits. Your dentist may leave the tooth open for a few days to drain. You might also be given medicine to help control infection that may have spread beyond the tooth.
    5. The pulp chamber and root canals are filled and sealed.
    6. The temporary filling is removed and the pulp chamber and root canal(s) are cleaned and filled.
    7. In the final step, a gold or porcelain crown is usually placed over the tooth. If an endodontist performs the treatment, he or she will recommend that you return to your family dentist for this final step.
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  • 14 Answers
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    Once upon a time, if you had a tooth with a diseased nerve, you'd probably lose that tooth. Today, with a special dental procedure called a root canal therapy you may save that tooth. Inside each tooth is the pulp which provides nutrients and nerves to the tooth, it runs like a thread down through the root. When the pulp is diseased or injured, the pulp tissue dies. If you don't remove it, your tooth gets infected and you could lose it. After the dentist removes the pulp, the root canal is cleaned and sealed off to protect it. Then your dentist places a crown over the tooth to help make it stronger.
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  • 15 Answers
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    Root canal treatment is necessary when the soft pulp tissues in your tooth become inflamed or diseased. During root canal treatment, your dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in treating the insides of teeth) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.
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  • 1 Answer
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    ADe Vizio, DMD, Dentistry, answered on behalf of Colgate
    There are several possible complications of a dental root amputation. The main complication is that the tooth might later need to be extracted (removed). A dental root amputation is performed when one of the roots of a tooth is damaged, but the rest of the tooth is not. The goal of the procedure is to remove the damaged root while stabilizing the rest of the tooth so it can remain in place. If the tooth is not stable enough after the dental root amputation, it might need to be removed. If the area becomes infected, that might also result in the loss of the tooth.

    Another complication is that the surgeon could damage nearby teeth during the procedure, or make a small hole in the sinus if the surgery involves an upper molar. As with any dental surgery procedure, there’s always the possibility of bleeding, swelling, and pain after the procedure. If any of these seem excessive, contact your endodontist.