G-Spot Stimulation

G-Spot Stimulation

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    AEva Cwynar, MD, Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism, answered
    According to some experts, the G-spot is located in the anterior vaginal wall, about 2 or 3 centimeters in front of the cervix, near the bladder neck. This area's texture feels different from the rest of the vaginal interior as it softly ribbed, like corduroy material. However, according to Dr. Dolores Kent, a Los Angeles-based pioneer in specialized vaginal procedures, the G-spot is not an anatomical landmark. It's more of a zone than a spot. Many women (and their partners) go through life never knowing where their G-spot is, which is unfortunate because caressing and pressing lightly on this spot can lead to intense sexual arousal and orgasms.
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  • 1 Answer
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    AEva Cwynar, MD, Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism, answered
    Imagine being able to enhance the quality of your orgasms simply by having a quick and nearly painless injection in a doctor's office. The G-spot amplification shot allows you to do this. Designed strictly for sexual enhancement, this procedure has helped thousands of women dramatically improve their sexual satisfaction. This is a controversial procedure and is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration, mainly because there is no consensus as to where the G-spot is, or even if it really exists. I have included it here just to let you know that there are indeed a wide variety of options for women who are interested in improving their sex lives.

    The procedure starts with the physician locating the G-spot using a specially designed speculum to take measurements. Next, a local anesthetic is injected into the area where the G-spot has been located. Once the anesthetic has taken effect a synthetically engineered human collagen is injected into the G-spot, creating a marble-sized nub that pushes up against the spot. Dr. Dolores Kent, a Los Angeles-based pioneer in specialized vaginal procedures, states, "Four hours later, the woman is good to go. She can make love that night, and the benefits of the procedure last for about three months." This is not for women who don't have orgasms at all, but for women who want to enhance the sensations they already have. Many of her patients are women in their 30s who describe their sexual satisfaction level as a 6 before the procedure, and as a 10 after it is done.

    The cost of the shot varies from physician to physician, averaging about $1,600.00. While Viagra, penile injections, and prosthesis for men are covered by most health-insurance plans to enhance male sexual fulfillment, G-spot amplification is still considered elective cosmetic surgery and therefore not yet covered by health plans. However, as long as you are practicing safe sex with your partner, the cost may be justified, as great sex is so beneficial for your physical and mental health.
  • 1 Answer
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    AGood In Bed answered
    If you'd like to stimulate your Grafenberg spot (G-spot), have your partner insert his index finger into your vagina, turn it so that it's facing your front vaginal wall, and wiggle it in a come hither gesture. He can then massage the area above your pelvic bone and tap the inside of your vaginal wall.

    Some women experience discomfort when their G-spot is stimulated, and even feel a sensation akin to the need to urinate. This sensation is normal. To ease your mind, however, you can just pee before experimenting with this form of stimulation. And if there is a clear fluid that leaks out upon orgasm, congratulations! You've just experienced female ejaculation.

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    AEmily Nagoski, Psychology, answered on behalf of Good In Bed

    To sum up, I’ll give you three general guidelines to follow while you’re exploring the G-spot: Start slow, go long, and relax.

     1:Start slow. Remember, the G-spot is easier to find and more erotically sensitive when you’re already aroused. Spend time with nonpenetrative stimulation before you go for the G-spot.

     2:Go long. Take your time and allow your arousal level to build. Feel free to alternate between G-spot and clitoral stimulation, or do both simultaneously. G-spot stimulation can generate a very intense level of arousal, but it often takes time to build up. Allow for half an hour or even an hour -- it’s better than a long, hot bath!

     3:Relax. Because it can take time, you might worry that it’s taking too long, or you might start wondering if it’s working. Remember: Your definition of success is enjoying this new experience and not wondering if you’re doing it “right.” If it feels good, you’re doing it right. Allow yourself to feel good without having any goal beyond just experiencing this pleasure.

    G-spot play is all about expanding your sexual potential and exploring your sexual landscape. Getting to know your body and all the glorious things it can do for you is a reward in and of itself. Give the G-spot a try and see how it changes your sexuality

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    The Good in Bed Guide to Female Orgasms
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    A
    AEmily Nagoski, Psychology, answered on behalf of Good In Bed

    For most women, mastering G-spot stimulation takes practice. If you make orgasm your goal, chances are you’ll fall short of that goal and that might feel demoralizing. Instead, make the creation of intense and pleasurable new experiences your goal. You’ll hit the mark every time. Remember, it’s not a competition and you are not being rated. The best way to improve your sex life is to enjoy the sex you’re having.

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    AEmily Nagoski, Psychology, answered on behalf of Good In Bed
    The buildup required for orgasm stimulated by the G-spot is, for most women, long and slow and intense. Don’t worry about taking “too long” -- the longer it takes, the bigger the orgasm. Stop if it hurts. Learning about the G-spot and what it can do for you is recreational. You can have a perfectly satisfactory and happy sex life without ever doing anything with it -- and a lot of women do. Your decision to learn more about this intense new kind of stimulation is like a daily jogger deciding to run her first mini-marathon. It takes something you already know and love to a profound new level -- but it is a hobby, something you do for fun and pleasure, not because you have to. G-spot stimulation isn’t for everyone. If it hurts, stop.

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    AEmily Nagoski, Psychology, answered on behalf of Good In Bed
    A crucial rule of G-spot stimulation is to pee first. This is mostly for psychological reasons: When you’re very aroused, it’s very difficult to pee, but stimulation of the G-spot sometimes feels like needing to pee. If you know your bladder is empty, you can relax.

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    AEmily Nagoski, Psychology, answered on behalf of Good In Bed

    The vagina does not go straight up and down. For most women, it is angled toward the abdomen. If you put pressure there, you might feel like you have to pee. That’s because you’re essentially pressing against the urethra, and your brain is interpreting that sensation as a need to pee.

    It might also be that pressure against the G-spot just hurts. If that’s true for you, there are a couple things that might be causing the pain. The first is the G-spot itself. You might be one of the women not wired for pleasurable G-spot stimulation. Don’t worry -- there are plenty of other ways for you to have an orgasm. It might also be that the pain is related not the to G-spot but to penetration itself. Friction burns and can cause irritation. A last source of pain might be inflammation or infection of the vagina. Yeast infections, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and other imbalances of the vaginal flora can cause burning, itching, and irritation

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    AEmily Nagoski, Psychology, answered on behalf of Good In Bed
    A woman’s G-spot is sort of like a prostate. For every part that a man has, a woman has an equivalent part, or homologue. It’s all the same stuff, just organized in a different way. The penis is the homologue of the clitoris, the scrotum is the homologue of the outer labia, and so on. Well, the prostate is the homologue of the urethral sponge, a spongy body of tissue that wraps around the urethra inside a woman’s body. The prostate in men is known to have two functions: It swells up around the man’s urethra when he’s aroused, preventing him from urinating while he’s turned on. It also produces seminal fluid, the whitish liquid in which sperm travel. The urethral sponge, we therefore assume, has the equivalent functions in women. It does, in fact, swell with arousal, closing off the urethra.

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    AEmily Nagoski, Psychology, answered on behalf of Good In Bed

    History: “G” stands for Grafenberg, the gynecologist who “discovered” the spot. In 1950 he wrote an academic article about the role of the urethra in female sexual response, particularly with regard to orgasm through vaginal penetration. The “G-spot” was named by researchers Beverly Whipple and John Perry, 30 years after Grafenberg’s original article was published.

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    The Good in Bed Guide to Female Orgasms
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