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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The most commonly prescribed medications for depression, panic disorder,
    eating disorders, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (see below) are SSRIs, including fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and sertraline (Zoloft), which work by allowing more serotonin to be available in your brain. Antidepressants are not a quick fix--it can take a few weeks before you begin to feel better. During that time you need to assess your feelings and moods and have the prescribing doctor adjust the medication accordingly, but it’s more of a slow fix than a quick one. SSRIs prevent serotonin from being taken up and broken down as fast, leaving it active in the synaptic spaces for a few nanoseconds longer, where it does its thing to make you feel good. SSRIs are not addicting but some patients may find them very helpful and stay on them for years, while others may be able to forgo
    them after a few months. They do not change your personality or make you a different person; they allow your brains own natural serotonin to do its own thing and help you re-find you.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    There’s a formal series of questions called the CRAFFT Screening Tool,adapted from adolescent medicine and addictions expert Dr. John Knight, to screen for alcohol and drug addiction. It works equally well for other addictions, like Facebook, as shown below. Feel free to sub in whatever potentiallyaddictive substance or behavior you’re concerned about. If you answer yes to any of questions, it can be a sign of a habit becoming an addiction.

    1. Has anyone ever told you that you have a problem with Facebook, or that
    you should cut down on your time on Facebook?

    2. Do you wake up and immediately feel like you need to check Facebook
    or have a Facebook fix?

    3. Has being on Facebook ever caused you problems in the rest of your life
    (like caused you to not study enough for a test or fail to finish a paper)?

    4. Have you ever chosen being on Facebook instead of another pleasurable
    experience, like hanging out with friends or family?

    5. Have you ever missed a normal vital part of daily life to be on Facebook,
    like joining your family at the dinner table or taking a shower?    

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    lackluster teacher
    Teachers are supposed to be your cheerleaders. In this video, Drs. Oz, Roizen, and Rome give sound advice on not limiting yourself because of other people's unsupportive words.


  • 3 Answers
    A

    Teen Dating Violence is defined as the psychological, emotional, physical, and sexual violence that occurs within a dating relationship. In this form of relationship, bullying can occur during face-to-face encounters and electronically. Just like with bullying, the use of technology makes escaping an abusive partner difficult and it can continue 24/7. If not deterred early, victims can suffer from long-term effects, such as:

    • decline in academic performance

    • susceptibility to alcohol or drug use

    • depression

    • self-harm

    • suicide attempts

    • future relationships with abusive partners

    If you or someone you know is a victim of teen dating violence, please seek help.

    Resources:

    http://www.victimsofcrime.org/

    The National Domestic Violence Hotline 1.800.799.SAFE (7233) or 1.800.787.3224 (TTY)http://www.thehotline.org/

    http://www.loveisrespect.org/

    http://www.ndah.org/

     

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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The most common addictions are (1) alcohol, (2) cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, (3) marijuana, (4) video games, and (5) Facebook, in that order. People tend to forget about chewing tobacco and snuff, but it is just as addictive and dangerous to your health as cigarettes.    
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Many parts of the body have some extra capacity built in. You can have an entire lung or kidney removed and get along fine with the one that remains. There's skin, small and large intestine, and bone marrow to spare. If the appendix, thymus, and spleen need to go, so be it. We can do without them if necessary.

    But the notion that we use just 10% of our brains, or some other small percentage, isn't true. Brain scans of various kinds have shown we regularly use all of the brain. Some parts are more active at any given time or during a particular activity. Some parts may be less critical for important functions, such as breathing, speaking, understanding, or walking. And the brain is remarkably adaptable, so one part can take over, or compensate, for another. But there is no part of the brain that is known to be unused or completely unnecessary.

    I'm not sure where the 10% notion came from, but I do know it gained currency before researchers had a reliable way of measuring brain activity. Even now, MRI and PET scans don't provide a perfect estimate of how much of the brain is being used at any one time. Some redundancy makes sense, but it defies logic and well-accepted scientific principles for an organ to increase in size over the course of thousands of years if 90% of it was going unused—especially considering that the brain requires a good deal of blood flow and energy to keep running.
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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Psychology, answered
    To experience mindfulness, sit for a few minutes without doing anything at all -- not listening to music or texting or answering the phone if it rings. Just try to  notice your surroundings and yourself in this time.

    Mindfulness is about paying attention to everything in your life. The first step toward becoming mindful is learning to just notice what you are thinking and feeling about a given situation. Instead of responding to these thoughts and feelings immediately, you can begin to sit with them, to observe them, before you decide what they mean and how you want to respond. You might still choose to respond the same way, but taking time will allow you to figure out how you want to react to a situation, to assess how big or small it is and how stressful it is for you.

    Say to yourself, “Oh, this is what I am thinking and feeling right now. I don’t have to do anything about these thoughts and feelings. I can just sit with them before I react.”
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Psychology, answered

    According to Rape Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) and The Bureau of Justice Statistics, approximately 1 out of 5 boys and 1 out of 3 girls will be sexually abused before their eighteenth birthday. Of those assaults, 34.3% were family members, 58.7% were acquaintances and only 7% were strangers. So, the vast majority of sexual assaults occur with people the teen knows and trusts.

    Sources

    http://www.rainn.org/

    http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Impulse control disorders occur when impulsive behaviors get the best of you. They are characterized by:

    • an increasing sense of tension or excitement before committing an impulsive
    act

    • pleasure, gratification, or relief when you actually commit the impulsive act

    • possibly regret or guilt following the act (This part doesn’t always occur; it
    depends on the situation and the consequences.)  
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    First, see if you can quit cold turkey. Just stopping abruptly often works for those in the early stages of an addiction, as it’s more like breaking a bad habit at that point. But once your brain has been hardwired to crave the substance or behavior, you may need additional help.

    If you try to quit yourself but can’t, seek help. Start with your doctor and/or your school counselor, to seek information on how to quit. Your parents may also be great resources, unless of course, they are using themselves.

    If you think you can just use a little bit, think long and hard about the short and long-term consequences. Other helpful hints: Find friends who don’t use.


    A change of scenery or a change of companions can do wonders for discovering healthier ways to spend your time, energy, and money, and help remove you from the environment that can trigger a specific addiction. There’s evidence that a young person’s network of peers is a powerful determinant of his or her behaviors; it’s hard to overestimate the influence that friends can have. That is why one of the strengths of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), Overeaters Anonymous (OA), and other successful antiaddiction programs is that they provide a new peer group; instead of hanging out at the same old bar, you go to group. As a chronic disorder,
    addiction requires long-term treatment that is usually measured in months and years.