When should I call a doctor after bariatric surgery?

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After bariatric surgery, patients should call their doctor if they think there is a problem. In this video, John Pilcher, MD, of Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital explains what signs may warrant a call to the doctor. 
Connect with both your surgeons and online treatment center for ongoing support during your recovery. Attend support groups, keep follow-up appointments with your surgeon and meet with a dietitian that specializes in weight loss to give you advice as you transition into each new phase of life and your diet. Contact your surgeon or dietitian if you start to notice unexpected weight gain to determine if changes can be made early on.
Early on after bariatric surgery, your surgeon will give you specific instructions on when to call and seek medical attention. In general, any signs of a fever, a fast heart rate, decreased urination, increasing pain or weakness should prompt you to call your surgeon to discuss your symptoms. Inability to tolerate liquids, nausea and vomiting should also be evaluated.
After recovery from your operation and for the rest of your life, routine annual visits should be scheduled with your bariatric team to ensure that you are maintaining adequate nutrition. Serum levels of your vitamins and minerals should be evaluated on a routine basis. Weight regain, abdominal pain, and inability to tolerate a diet are also important reasons to seek further consultation

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.