Weight Guidelines

Weight Guidelines

Weight Guidelines
People ask all the time when they begin weight loss, "How much weight is okay to lose?" Unfortunately, there's not one blanket answer for everyone. Factors like your body mass index (BMI) and metabolic rate all factor into determining what your healthy weight loss number should be.

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    Whether you are trying to gain or lose weight, the most important thing to remember about weighing yourself is to do it at the same time of the day every time. It does not matter what time, just be consistent with the time.
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    Body fat loss requires a balanced approach of diet and exercise. Fad diets do NOT work when it comes to body fat loss, so if it promises quick results with little work pass it up. Establish your base calorie intake and make sure that you are creating  a calorie deficit DAILY. A pound of fat is equal to 3500 calories so you can eliminate 500 calories per day from your diet and burn an extra 500 calories per day with moving more to equal a body fat loss of 1-2 pounds per week which is a healthy rate of fat loss.

    Now, to eliminate 500 calories per day you can try some tricks such as passing on the candies and fat laden treats, trade the morning bagel for oatmeal, and switch to black coffee instead of sugar and cream. Also, be very aware of portion sizes and make it a point to weigh and measure your food as you are starting out.

    To make the body burn off an extra 500 calories per day, step up your workouts. Instead of walking aroung the block try running as fast as you can for 30 seconds then walking to recover for 1 minute and repeating this cycle for 30 full minutes. You can also run stairs or bleachers to increase calorie burn. If you have a gym membership, try out a new class such as cycling, step, or Zumba to get your burn on. Remember to incorporate at least 3 days of strength training per week to ensure that you keep your lean muscle mass and therefore raise your metabolic rate, meaning you burn more calories no matter what!
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  • 1 Answer
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    A Healthcare, answered on behalf of

    Essentially, healthy eating for a healthy weight can be boiled down to the following:

    • Eating the right kinds of foods -- foods with maximum amounts of healthy nutrients and minimal amounts of added sugar and solid fat.
    • Eating the right amounts of these foods, with choices from each of the five food groups -- in other words, meals that are planned and balanced.
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    This is a question has a broad answer for a teen. The best way to find if you are in a healthy weight range is BMI (Body Mass Index). BMI is a ratio of height to weight and is a helpful tool especially during the adolescent years when changes in the body happen more quickly. You can figure your BMI on your own (see link below), but BMI does not tell you everything about your body composition, or the amount of lean mass (muscle, bone, etc) and amount of fat mass. BMI does not take into account if you have a lot of muscle or large frame or if you are a small person with a small frame with a lot of fat. If you see your doctor regularly, BMI will be calculated and that number will be plotted on a chart. If your doctor feels there is an issue with your weight, he or she will ask you questions about your health, diet and exercise habits and may make a referral to a certified professional (nutritionist, wellness coach, exercise specialist, etc.).

    The link below is an online BMI calculator: 
    http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmicalc.htm
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    Healthcare providers use several different measures to assess body weight. Common ways of looking at body weight include the following:
    • Body mass index (BMI). This is a measure of body mass based on your height and weight. It's helpful in showing whether you are overweight.
    • Waist circumference and waist-hip ratio. Measuring your waist and hips can show where your body tends to store fat. People who store body fat around the waist have more risk of heart disease. Generally, men with a waist over 40 inches and nonpregnant women with a waist over 35 inches are at higher risk.
    • Body composition measures. Several different methods -- for example, skin fold tests and underwater weighing -- can check how much of your weight is due to muscle or fat.
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    With the U.S. obesity rate still climbing and the prevalence of added sugars in processed foods raising alarm bells, knowing your healthy weight has become as important as knowing other risk factors, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels and blood sugar readings.

    Many studies have shown that being obese or overweight increases the likelihood of certain diseases and other health problems. Losing weight and keeping it off can help reduce risk factors and keep heart disease, type 2 diabetes and other diseases at bay.

    Individuals who have excessive abdominal fat should consult with their doctor to develop a plan for losing weight. Overall, “underweight,” “normal,” “overweight” and “obese” are the labels used according to ranges of weight. But they are just labels. These categories help identify body types, but they’re just a starting point for treating weight-related health conditions. Regular exercise and proper nutrition can help fight heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and chronic conditions as we get older.
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    These days, it seems as though everybody is talking about overweight and obesity. And it's not just a slightly larger waistline that might come with middle age. It's weight gain that damages our health. According to national data analyzed in 2002, it's estimated that 65 percent of Americans are now overweight or obese, and more than 61 million adults are obese.

    Adults aren't the only ones who've been getting heavier. Children have been getting heavier as well. The percentage of children and teens who are overweight has more than doubled since the 1970s. About 16 percent of children and teens are overweight.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

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    A answered

    Health care professionals generally agree that people who have a BMI of 30 or greater can improve their health through weight loss. This is especially true for people with a BMI of 40 or greater, who are considered extremely obese.

    Preventing additional weight gain is recommended if you have a BMI between 25 and 29.9, unless you have other risk factors for obesity-related diseases. Obesity experts recommend you try to lose weight if you have two or more of the following:

    • Family history of certain chronic diseases. If you have close relatives who have had heart disease or diabetes, you are more likely to develop these problems if you are obese.
    • Preexisting medical conditions. High blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol levels, low HDL cholesterol levels, high triglycerides, and high blood glucose are all warning signs of some obesity-associated diseases.
    • Large waist circumference. Men who have waist circumferences greater than 40 inches, and women who have waist circumferences greater than 35 inches, are at higher risk of diabetes, dyslipidemia (abnormal amounts of fat in the blood), high blood pressure, and heart disease.

    Fortunately, a weight loss of 5 to 10 percent of your initial body weight can do much to improve health by lowering blood pressure and other risk factors for obesity-related diseases. In addition, research shows that a 5- to 7-percent weight loss brought about by moderate diet and exercise can delay or possibly prevent type 2 diabetes in people at high risk for the disease. In a recent study, participants who were considered overweight and had pre-diabetes—a condition in which a person’s blood glucose level is higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes—were able to delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes by adopting a low-fat, low-calorie diet and exercising for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week.

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    A , Fitness, answered
    I've never been a fan of the scale. I always say "Judge your progress by the clothes you wear and the clothes you'll have to buy." If you must weigh in, do it first thing in the morning, at least twice a month.

    The 3-1-2-1 Diet: Eat and Cheat Your Way to Weight Loss--up to 10 Pounds in 21 Days
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If we struggle with our weight, we may experience anything along the spectrum of physical and emotional difficulties. We may suffer from diabetes, heart disease or chronic pain that is triggered by carrying around more than our frame can handle. We may have difficulty walking, cycling, swimming or engaging in other physical activity -- further exacerbating the core problem of weight management by causing us to live a relatively sedentary life. Additionally, we may feel crippling discomfort in our bodies, and -- given our society’s biases about size -- shame about how we look, leading to isolation, depression and even self-hatred. All of these struggles in turn may set off a chain reaction of difficulties, adversely impacting our lives socially, professionally, financially, medically and more.