Water & The Body

Water & The Body

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  • 2 Answers
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    Staying hydrated can be a challenge, especially during hot summer days.

    Here are five easy ways to increase your fluid intake:
    • Carry a reusable water bottle. After you've emptied it, you'll be more likely to fill it back up if it's easily accessible.
    • Eat fruit or popsicles. You don't have to just drink your water -- you get fluids from what you eat as well. Fruits, like watermelon and cantaloupe, have high water content, as well as frozen treats like 100% fruit juice pops.
    • Give your water a twist. Adding flavor to your water can make it easier to drink more. Drop in slices of lemon, lime, cucumber or strawberries. Herbal ice teas are a great way to spice up water, too.
    • Sip throughout the day. Little things add up and fluid intake is no exception. Rather than downing a full beverage in one sitting, take drinks regularly throughout the day.
    • Plan ahead. If you are headed for a workout outside or an outing at the pool, make sure to pack plenty of fluids for the trip. When in the heat, you lose fluids more quickly.
    Headaches, dizziness and drowsiness are all signs of dehydration. Keeping up your fluid intake will keep you feeling healthy and alert.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Water makes up 60 percent of our body. So it is obviously a crucial element of our diet. How much water we need each day varies from person to person. You lose water each day in your urine, sweat, and bowel movements and you also lose fluids from your respiratory tract when you breathe. The food you eat provides some of your water requirements, and liquids provide the rest. Any beverage you consume has water in it. Some beverage choices are obviously better than others. Plain old water is always a safe, healthful option. How much water should you drink each day? If your urine is dark yellow, you need to drink more fluids; if it is pale yellow, you are adequately hydrated.

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    Research indicates that drinking a cool beverage during exercise may help a little bit with cooling the body. While gastric emptying (the speed that fluid leaves the stomach and can begin to hydrate the body) has been studied extensively, there does not seem to be an appreciable advantage to either cold or warm liquids. Most people will drink more of a cold liquid, and if that’s the case, it may increase voluntary hydration.
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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    It is a challenge to stay hydrated while traveling, especially because it is harder to carry liquids on planes these days. You can buy water after passing through security to supplement what you will be given on the plane. Having water available the morning after you get to your hotel can be a challenge. One tip is to fill your ice bucket prior to going to bed. A lot of the ice will melt overnight, and you'll have refreshing ice cold, usually filtered water when you wake up the next morning.

    It is important not to be tempted by sweetened sodas or other beverages because of their high simple sugar and effective calorie content. Although most fruit juices have greater vitamin content than standard carbonated beverages, they are generally loaded with simple sugars and should be drunk sparingly or avoided. Vegetable or tomato juice might be a more practical substitute. Water -- carbonated or not -- with a squeeze of lemon remains a top choice for staying hydrated while traveling. Tea and coffee might have other merits, but both have natural diuretic qualities and are not great hydrating liquids.

    Skim milk has more protein and fewer effective calories than many other commonly available beverages.
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    A answered

    Of all the reasons water (preferably filtered) is oh-so-good for you, the work it does for your guts is one of the best. For starters, it helps lubricate everything, so food can slide through more easily. Plus, it helps quell hunger and fights bad breath.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Drinking water does not affect the outer layers of skin cells that are already dead and waiting to be sloughed off. It does however deliver vital nutrients to the deeper layers and gives the skin bounce and support.
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    A , Integrative Medicine, answered

    Take a moment to notice if your mouth or lips are dry. Most of you will find that they are dry. If so, you are dehydrated and need to drink more water. Although it is not unusual for those of us under stress to require a gallon of water a day, I do not recommend counting the number of glasses of water that you drink per day because this can get old fairly quickly. Simply notice if your mouth or lips are dry and drink water when they are. I like to keep a glass or bottle of good quality water with me.

     

     

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - Iced Green Tea

    If plain water leaves you cold, swap it for something with a bit more flavor (plus some health benefits). That's one trick that helped Transformation Nation finalist Mercedes Moebuis drop from a size 16 to a size 6. Watch the video to find out more.


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    A Ear, Nose & Throat (Otolaryngology), answered on behalf of
    Drinking water is always a good idea. Your vocal cords open and close to regulate airflow in and out of your lungs. As such, they react to the relative humidity of the air you breathe. In very dry places your vocal cords can get drier and stiffer, making it harder to make them vibrate easily (think of dried leather). You can feel this effect of the air on your voice. However, drinking water does not ‘water’ or moisten the vocal cords. It never even touches them (if it does, you’ll know it!). Instead, drinking enough water keeps your whole body hydrated, including the vocal cords. However, you can also ‘water’ your cords by inhaling steam or water vapor through an open mouth. That’s one reason you might sound so good in the shower!
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    While your tap water may be potable, that doesn't mean it's pure or healthy. A lot of people can get low-grade infections from bacteria in local water supply-and that can lead to such symptoms as feeling bloated, itchy eyes, stomach cramping, and fatigue. And you'd have no idea what even caused the problems.

    You don't need to blow your 401(k) on bottled water, but it's a smart idea to use a water filter for any drinking water you use out of the faucet.
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