Vitamins

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    Symptoms of vitamin B deficiency include fatigue, paleness, shortness of breath, feeling irritable for no reason or having a red tongue, bleeding gums or small cracks on the sides of your mouth.
     
    Although B vitamins are widespread in a variety of foods, several studies suggest many people, particularly those who restrict their total calorie intake, aren’t meeting recommended intake levels for certain B vitamins through their diet. Those who cut calories, have digestive diseases (such as Crohn’s or celiac disease), vegans and people who use antacids for extended periods of time have an increased risk of developing a deficiency in one or more B vitamins.

    Correcting a B­vitamin deficiency should help you feel better and more energetic while also improving endurance performance. However, loading up on B vitamins, by taking more than you need, won’t make your energy levels go through the roof or turn you into Usain Bolt. But it might make your urine bright yellow.
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    Taking large amounts of vitamins, any vitamin, can cause problems for the body. Vitamins A, D, E, K in particular can accumulate in the body and cause problems. A simple daily multivitamin has been dosed to not cause problems for the body. Generally speaking, people who eat a well-balanced diet should have no need for taking vitamin supplements. An exception is that a prenatal vitamin has shown to be beneficial to women of childbearing age. Also, people who are taking certain medications may require vitamin supplementation.
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    Niacin (B3) is a nutrient commonly found in fortified food products. Excessive intake can cause skin reactions such as flushing and rash. It can also lead to nausea and liver toxicity.
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    For vitamins and minerals, there are health risks to consuming too much as well as too little. Adequate amounts are essential to maintain health and prevent disease; historically deficiencies of essential vitamins have caused diseases such as scurvy, pellagra and rickets. In developed countries, however, economic advances over the last century have significantly improved diets, resulting in a better dietary supply of many nutrients. Paradoxically, however, widespread use of dietary supplements and extensive mandatory and voluntary fortification of foods with vitamins and minerals have created the opposite danger -- excessive intake. It’s still important for everyone to get an adequate supply of micronutrients, but it is also vital to make sure people don’t get too much of certain vitamins and minerals because overconsumption can also cause health problems.
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    People shouldn’t be relying on vitamins and minerals in pill form to provide the healthy nutrients their bodies need to work properly. Instead, focus your attention on getting your vitamins and minerals from the foods you eat.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Are multivitamins a waste of money?
    The best way to get vitamins is from food, except for vitamin D, magnesium and calcium, which are sometimes hard for people to get into their diets. In this video, Robin Miller, MD, talks about where to get your vitamins.
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    A answered
    Prenatal vitamins do not increase the chances of becoming pregnant, but you should still take them every day. They are important for the health of a baby and can prevent specific birth defects in babies.
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    Your family doctor can give you advice regarding what vitamins, if any, to take. The only clear reason to take a vitamin supplement is if you are lacking in that vitamin. The best way to ensure that you are not lacking in any vitamins is to eat a healthy and well-balanced diet, including plenty of fruits and vegetables.
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    A , Preventive Medicine, answered
    What are the risks involved with vitamin injection therapy?
    Most people take vitamins orally, but some turn to injection therapy. In this video, I will reveal why these injections might be risky.
     
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    Iron is one of the most toxic substances for children and represents one of the most common types of childhood poisonings. And we’re not just talking about adult iron supplements, either. Those yummy-tasting cartoon character or dinosaur-shaped vitamins with fruit candy flavors can just as easily cause iron poisoning. An overdose of iron causes abdominal cramps accompanied by stomach bleeding, followed by a quiet phase when the child seems fine. Then liver toxicity and breakdown of red bloodcells can occur. Iron poisoning can be deadly.