Vitamin K

Vitamin K

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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Injections of vitamin K1 (as an aqueous colloidal solution) do not generally interact with other drugs. However, these injections can temporarily decrease the effectiveness of certain anticoagulants. This effect can usually be offset by either adjusting the anticoagulant dose or substituting a different anticoagulant.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    People who are not deficient in vitamin K or who are allergic to any injection ingredients should NOT receive vitamin K1 injections. It is not clear whether vitamin K1 injection is appropriate for pregnant mothers, breastfeeding women and children. Because injectable vitamin K1 can accumulate rapidly in the body (presenting a risk of overdose), these injections should be given only after other approaches have been exhausted. Care should always be taken to limit dosage.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Aqueous colloidal solution of vitamin K1 is associated with the following side effects:
    • unusual taste in the mouth, unusual skin sensations, discolored skin, dizziness, compromised pulse, sweating, low blood pressure and problems breathing
    • allergic reactions (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives)
    In addition, when delivered intramuscularly or intravenously, the rapid accumulation of vitamin K in the body can lead to an overdose that interferes with basic bodily functions. In these cases, cardiac or respiratory failure can lead to death.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Injections of vitamin K1 are used to treat problems with blood clotting related to vitamin K deficiency. These deficiencies can occur in newborns or can result from various disorders caused by medication side effects. Aqueous solution of vitamin K1 is usually administered in a hospital setting, under a doctor's prescription and instructions.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Before receiving an injection of an aqueous colloidal solution of vitamin K1, you should know that:
    • Intramuscular and intravenous injections of vitamin K1 have been associated with deaths, caused when a rapid buildup of vitamin K1 in the body leads to cardiac or respiratory failure. 
    • Because of the risk of death, aqueous colloidal solution of vitamin K1 should be administered only in an emergency situation where other delivery mechanisms are not possible.
    • Some vitamin K1 solutions may contain toxic quantities of aluminum.
    • While vitamin K1 injections can be given to newborns, solutions containing benzyl alcohol can be dangerous for them.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Although phytonadione is a vitamin -- vitamin K -- it is not available without a prescription from your doctor. If you think you may need vitamin K, discuss this concern with your doctor. Your doctor can do several tests on your blood to determine whether your blood is clotting normally and whether vitamin K would help you.
     
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    If you are allergic to phytonadione or any ingredient used to make it, you should not take this drug. For example, some forms may contain the ingredient polysorbate 80; if you know you are allergic to this substance, ask your doctor if the formulation you will take contains this. Some of the injectable preparations of phytonadione contain aluminum; talk to your doctor if this is a concern.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    A serious, but rare, effect of phytonadione (vitamin K) is anaphylaxis. This is a severe allergic response to phytonadione in which your body's immune system treats the vitamin K as a harmful, rather than helpful, substance. This causes the release of many chemicals that can damage organs throughout your body. Low blood pressure, difficulty breathing, or even a total stop in breathing are all indications that you are having an anaphylactic reaction to phytonadione.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Phytonadione, or vitamin K, is often taken as a pill. If you take vitamin K in pill form your doctor may also prescribe another medicine, called a bile salt, to take with it. Other forms of phytonadione are injections that are given in the muscle -- called intramuscular injections -- as well as injections given under the skin, known as subcutaneous, or "Sub-Q," injections. If it is necessary, phytonadione can be given through an IV line as well.
     
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    As with nearly any medicine, taking phytonadione could trigger an allergic reaction. This occurs because your immune system treats the medicine, or any ingredient used in the preparation you are taking, as a potentially harmful substance. The immune system attack results in symptoms that can be mild or serious. If you take phytonadione and notice your eyes are itchy or you get a rash or even hives, you are probably having a mild allergic reaction. However, if you begin noticing that your lips or tongue are swelling or you are having difficulty breathing, you may be having a potentially dangerous allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. Call 911 or get to an emergency room as quickly as you can.