Vitamin C

Vitamin C

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    A , Healthcare, answered
    A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported that high blood levels of vitamin C were associated with a 45 percent reduced risk of inflammation, and high fruit intake was related to a 25 percent reduced risk of inflammation.

    Scientists have long noted that vitamin C plays a key role in building and protecting collagen. Collagen is an important part of the cartilage, which cushions the joints as they move. In osteoarthritis, the cartilage wears away and becomes less efficient.

    Seeking ways to offset the fact that your ability to maintain normal cartilage structure decreases with age, some comprehensive studies show that specific compounds in cherries, blackberries, and blueberries help in cartilage formation and prevent cartilage destruction. Less cartilage destruction means less pain and greater mobility as you age.
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    A , Integrative Medicine, answered
    Excess body weight increases the risk of developing gallstones. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) appears to help break cholesterol down in bile. Vitamin C deficiencies have been associated with a higher risk for gallstones. One study, reported that supplements were associated with a reduced risk for gallbladder disease in women. (Vitamin C had no effect one way or the other in men.)
  • 3 Answers
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Vitamin C may help treat a cold by lessening the severity of the symptoms and shortening the duration. The trick is, you have to take vitamin C regularly. If you wait until you feel a cold coming on, it won't help you. To get the benefits of vitamin C, take 1 to 3 grams every day, but no more: Too much C can cause side effects.
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    Taking 1,000 mg per day of vitamin C increased physical activity by 30% in men aged 18-35 and boosted their fitness, according to research. The researchers stated that the data demonstrate a measurable benefit of vitamin C supplementation for reducing cold episodes in young men with low to average vitamin C status. In addition, the data suggest a modest benefit of vitamin C supplementation for enhancing weekly activity levels in young men.

    The takeaway: Vitamin C does more than just fight colds. Take at least 1,000 mg per day to help your overall fitness program.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Yes, it can. Deferoxamine and iron supplements are both known to interact with vitamin C supplements. Vitamin C can also interact with aspirin, acetaminophen, fluphenazine, indinavir, levodopa, patches used for smoking cessation, antacids containing aluminum, certain antibiotics, certain barbiturates, blood thinners, birth control pills and hormone replacement therapies. If you take any of these medications or drugs regularly, you should notify your doctor before you begin taking vitamin C.

  • 3 Answers
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin, which means that it will dissolve in water. It works as an antioxidant, which means that it helps to prevent the growth of free radicals, problematic molecules that damage cells. Vitamin C also helps to boost the immune system in many ways, and helps the body absorb iron from food that is digested. Vitamin C also helps in the development of tissues and bone growth.

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    You should always discuss any vitamins or herbal supplements that you are considering taking with your primary care physician, plus any other specialists you are seeing, including your cardiologist. Many supplements may change the effectiveness of various medications you may be on to manage your heart disease. 

    For example, though more research is needed, vitamin C may interfere with the ability of warfarin (Coumadin) to thin your blood. Conversely, it may increase the level of aspirin in your blood.

    So if you are on medications for your heart, contact your physician before beginning supplementation. Those megadoses of vitamin C you may be taking to ward off the first cold virus of the season could change the effectiveness of important medications.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Despite a handful of studies hinting that vitamin C might ward off heart disease and cancer, evidence offers no support for supplemental C. Findings from the Physicians' Health Study II, which followed 14,641 men who took 500 mg of vitamin C daily for a decade, found no difference in the number of heart attacks, strokes, or deaths from cardiovascular disease compared with men who took placebos. In a separate analysis, researchers found that the likelihood of developing cancer was also nearly identical whether the men took vitamin C or a placebo. The study results were published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • 7 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Vitamin C helps reduce high blood pressure, prevents cataracts, and promotes wound healing. It improves lung function, preventing aging of the respiratory system. Also, vitamin C really does keep your immune system young. Linus Pauling, a Nobel-Prize-winning chemist, thought vitamin C helped cure colds. We now know it decreases the likelihood of the one ager we all want to avoid, cancer! For example, vitamin C helps prevent infections from the bacterium that causes both stomach and duodenal ulcers and stomach cancer, Helicobacter pylori. Recent data from analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate that those who had the highest vitamin C levels in their blood were more than 70% less likely to be infected by this disease-causing bacterium than those with the lowest levels. The authors of that study speculate that this resistance to dangerous bacteria that promote cancer is caused by the ability of vitamin C to make the stomach more acidic, and thus less favorable for the bacteria. Whatever the cause, it is an additional benefit of vitamin C.
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    Most of us know that vitamin C has many benefits such as helping ward off the common cold. But this essential nutrient found in many fruits and vegetables has another little-known function: It can help slow the progress of cataracts, the most common cause of vision loss in adults over 40.

    A study confirmed what many ophthalmologists and eye surgeons already know: A healthy diet rich in vitamin C can help replenish the loss of ascorbic acid in the natural lenses of the human eye. Ascorbic acid is the chemical name for vitamin C. The fluid inside the eye is normally high in vitamin C, which helps prevent oxidation that leads to clouding of the eye lens from cataracts.

    Cataracts affect more than 22 million Americans age 40 and older. Moreover, as the U.S. population ages, more than 30 million Americans are expected to have cataracts by the year 2020. Everyone should probably be eating a diet containing vitamin C anyway. This study confirms that vitamin C helps slow down the progression of cataracts. They used twins in the study, and about 2,000 people were followed over 10 years. The results were very encouraging.