Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6

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  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    A true vitamin B6 deficiency is rare, but some Americans do have lower levels of vitamin B than is healthy.

    Symptoms of severe vitamin B deficiency include:
    • scaling of the lips and cracks around the mouth
    • a swollen tongue
    • pins and needles sensations in the hands and feet
    • depression
    • confusion
    A deficiency can also cause anemia and weaken the immune system.
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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Individuals who have a vitamin B6 deficiency should take pyridoxine. Certain conditions may make you more likely to have a vitamin B6 deficiency, and thus require pyridoxine: alcoholism, burns, diarrhea, dialysis, heart or liver disease, intestinal problems, overactive thyroid, stress, serious injuries, a long-term illness or stomach removal. Infants who are feeding on unfortified formula may require pyridoxine. Pyridoxine has been suggested to treat acne, intoxication from alcohol, asthma, hemorrhoids, kidney stones, mental problems, headaches, nausea from headaches and menstrual issues as well as possibly stimulate appetite or lactation. However, these claims are not well proven, so if you are considering taking pyridoxine for one of these reasons, talk to your doctor first.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Pyridoxine, or vitamin B6, may interact with the cancer drug, altretamine, as well as alcohol and tobacco. Vitamin B6 may also decrease the effectiveness of levodopa, which is used to treat Parkinson's disease. However, the drug carbidopa can prevent this interaction from occurring. Vitamin B6 supplements can also interact with the anti-seizure medications Dilantin and phenobarbital, and the heart medication Cordarone. Because vitamin B6 may already be in other combination B vitamins or multivitamins, you should talk to your doctor before taking a separate pyridoxine supplement since it's possible to overdose on B6. Tell your doctor all the medications, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements, that you are taking before starting pyridoxine or any other therapeutic treatment.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    It is possible to overdose on vitamin B6 (pyridoxine). Vitamin B6 is present in a variety of foods, which is how most people get their daily requirement. B6 may also be present in other combination B vitamins or multivitamins. Taking any of these in combination with pyridoxine may lead to overdose. Symptoms of overdose include: poor coordination, stumbling or staggering, numbness, fatigue or decreased sensations that can last for up to six months. Seek medical attention if you believe you have taken too much vitamin B6.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    If you miss a dose of pyridoxine, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, do not take the missed dose. Resume the normal dosing schedule with your next dose. You should not take extra doses to make up for missed doses of pyridoxine as it is possible to overdose.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    You should take pyridoxine capsules, tablets or oral solutions exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Your healthcare practitioner may also provide pyridoxine in the form of an injection in some circumstances. If you're taking an extended-release capsule or tablet of pyridoxine, swallow the capsule or tablet whole. Do not crush, chew or break the tablet or capsule before swallowing, as this can interfere with the absorption of the extended-release formulation.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Pyridoxine is another name for vitamin B6. Several brand names are available, including Aminoxin, Pyri-500, Rodex and Vitabee 6. In addition, pyridoxine may be present in a variety of supplements and multivitamins.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    As with any medication, there can be risks in taking vitamin B6 (also known as pyridoxine). However, the risks are generally small. It is possible to have an allergic reaction or a drug interaction with vitamin B6 and another medication or supplement. It is also possible to overdose on it, which can cause numbness and clumsiness. If you are getting enough vitamin B6 through your diet or other B multivitamins, you should not take pyridoxine. Pyridoxine is generally considered safe during pregnancy and may be recommended to help with nausea during pregnancy.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Daily values for pyridoxine (vitamin B6) are based on age and gender. Here are the requirements:
    • Infants up to three years of age, between 0.1 to 0.5 milligrams (mg.)
    • Children 4-8 years of age, 0.6 mg.
    • Children 9-13 years of age, 1.0 mg.
    • Teen and adult males, 1.3-1.7 mg.
    • Teen and adult females  1.2-1.5 mg
    • Pregnant women, 1.9 mg.
    • Breastfeeding women, 2.0 mg.
    Talk with your doctor about recommendations based on your circumstances.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Pyridoxine comes in a variety of forms, which may either be over-the-counter or require a prescription. Pyridoxine may be found in an injectable solution, an oral solution, a tablet or a capsule. Tablets may also come in extended release or enteric coated versions. Talk with your doctor about what form of pyridoxine is right for you.