Uterine Fibroids

Uterine Fibroids

If you have uterine fibroids, you may never even notice that they are there. Ranging from the size of a small seed to grapefruit-sized, fibroids are tumors on the uterus that rarely cause harm. Some women have true discomfort with fibroids, including pain in the abdomen or low back, or pain during sex. Sometimes, uterine fibroids can cause miscarriage, preterm labor, or even lead to infertility. Women in their 40s and 50s, women of African-American descent and women that are overweight are at higher risk of developing fibroids, although an estimated 20-80% of women will have them at some point before they turn 50. If your doctor notices fibroids during an ultrasound or pelvic exam, he or she may want to treat them with medication or surgery.

Recently Answered

  • 3 Answers
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    A Vascular & Interventional Radiology, answered on behalf of
    Fibroids grow in the wall of the uterus and are located in the following areas:
    • Myometrial/intramural, located in the muscle wall of the uterus
    • Submucosal, located just under the surface of the uterine lining
    • Subserosal, located just under the outside covering of the uterus
    • Pendunculated, located on a long stalk on the outside of the uterus or inside the cavity of the uterus

     


     

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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Treatment for bleeding as a result of uterine fibroids can span from non –invasive to invasive: the medicinal approach to the surgical approach.  
    For example: Heavy bleeding and prolonged menstrual cycles, your GYN can prescribe oral contraceptives or progestins. A hormonal intra uterine device (inserted by your gynecologist) can be another option.
    Please keep in mind, when symptoms are not relieved by the medicinal approach, the patient may need additional treatment such as surgery or procedures such as uterine artery embolization or endometrial ablation.  
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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Diagnostic Radiology, answered on behalf of
    Can Uterine Fibroids Be Treated with Minimally Invasive Surgery?
    Uterine fibroids can be treated with minimally invasive surgery, says Anup Singh, MD, of Good Samaritan Hospital. Watch this video to learn more about the minimally invasive surgery used for uterine fibroids.
  • 8 Answers
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Up to 75% of women in the United States will develop fibroids at some point in their life, typically during their childbearing years. No one knows what causes fibroids. Research has shown several possibilities, but a specific genetic marker has not yet been identified. Identifying any gene that causes fibroids will allow doctors to tell women if they are prone to getting fibroids and steps to take to prevent the growths from affecting quality of life. Research into the cause of fibroids is ongoing.

    Uterine fibroids can grow as a single tumor or you can have many. They can be as small as an apple seed or as big as a grapefruit. The growths can cause significant pain, bleeding and fertility problems. 
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  • 3 Answers
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Fibroid Basics
    Fibroids are noncancerous growths of cells that start in the muscular layer of the uterine wall. Watch the animation to learn more about uterine fibroids.


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  • 11 Answers
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Aventura Hospital & Medical Center - Symptoms of Fibroids
    Pain, pressure, frequent urination and heavy or irregular bleeding are symptoms of fibroids, according to Jessica Ritch, MD, Gynecologist at Aventura Hospital & Medical Center.
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  • 3 Answers
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    You should know about fibroids because it is the leading cause of hysterectomy in the United States, despite the fact that they are benign tumors. Women may unnecessarily undergo hysterectomy and suffer consequences that include depression, sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence, bone loss, and an increased risk for heart disease. They need to be aware of excellent non-surgical options (ex. Uterine Fibroid Embolization) to treat fibroids as their healthcare provider may not mention these options to her.
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  • 3 Answers
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    Fibroids are benign tumors of the uterus. They grow in the 3 distinct portions of the uterus. Those that are found centrally near the cavity of the uterus and along the uterine lining are called submucosal. Those that grow in the muscular part of the uterus are called intramural, and those that grow near the edge of the uterus under the outer surface are called subserosal.
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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered

    Fibroids are benign (noncancerous) in 99% of the cases. When I see patients with fibroids, this is a very common question. There is a rare cancer of the uterus called a leiomyosarcoma, but this is thought to arise on its own and not from the transformation of a fibroid. Patients are also very worried that having fibroids can cause them to have an increased risk of other types of female cancers, and this is also untrue.

     

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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    If you become pregnant and have uterine fibroids, there is no intervention, unless you present with certain symptoms, such as pain. Then this can be managed by your ob/gyn. In fact, most patients who have uterine fibroids do not have problems in pregnancy; some of the fibroids actually reduce in size due to the pregnancy. If you are pregnant with fibroids, your doctor will monitor you closely.
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