Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    You can prevent a kidney infection by following a few good practices. Drink lots of fluids, particularly water, so that bacteria can be washed away when you urinate. Make sure you urinate often and never hold it in if possible. Wipe yourself from front to back after urinating or defecating. This will help to prevent bacteria around your anus from traveling to your urethra. Steer clear of feminine douches and sprays. Finally, after sexual intercourse, urinate as soon as possible to kill any bacteria that may have found its way into your urethra.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Your appointment will go smoothly if you are well prepared and know what to expect. Take a friend or relative along with you so they can hear information that you might miss. Tell the doctor pertinent information, such as, your symptoms, the medications you are on presently, possibility for STDs, a new job, or any other stressors that could be important. Prepare questions ahead of time so you can obtain the answers you need.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Bladder cancer begins in the lining of the bladder and often shows symptoms similar to bladder infection, but the two are not directly related. Bladder cancer is caused by abnormal cell growth and blood in the urine is one of the first symptoms. Bladder infections are most commonly caused by bacteria and blood in the urine is a less common symptom. Recurring bladder infections may indicate bladder cancer, but only a doctor can confirm the cause of your bladder infection. If you experience painful urination, blood in the urine, frequent urination, or abdominal pain, consult your physician.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    A bladder infection is usually a localized infection. The bladder is part of the urinary system and is connected to the kidney by the ureters and to the urethra, which moves urine to the outside of the body. A bladder infection may cause burning during urination, an uncontrollable urge to urinate with only small amounts of urine being passed at one time, pain in the pelvic area, or a general feeling of illness. A bladder infection, if left untreated, may spread to any part of the urinary system and cause several complications if it reaches the kidneys.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    You may need to be hospitalized and given antibiotics intravenously if your kidney infection is severe. Your infection might be resistant to the usual antibiotics delaying treatment and leaving you susceptible to kidney damage or failure. Septicemia, a bacterial infection in the blood, may occur if your kidney infection is not treated and can lead to death.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    The cause of a bladder infection is usually bacteria settling in the bladder. The factors that lead to bacteria in the bladder may vary depending on age and gender. Bacteria may come from the skin around the genitals and rectum. The most common bacteria causing bladder infections is E.coli which occurs naturally in the colon, but Chlamydia and Mycoplasma may also be culprits. For children, an obstruction to the urinary flow from a physical abnormality or a dysfunctional emptying of the bladder may cause urine to back up into the body, increasing the risk of a bladder infection. For men, a bladder infection is often connected to problems with the prostate. For women, using a diaphragm, sexual intercourse, pregnancy, and menopause can all influence the possibility of bladder infection.

  • 2 Answers
    A

    Your risk for bladder infection is highest if you are a woman in your reproductive years. Women's urethras are near the vagina and the rectum where bacteria reside. With this close proximity, and the shortness of the urethra, bacteria are more likely to reach the bladder. Sexual intercourse may push bacteria towards the urethra. If you are pregnant, you may have difficulty emptying the bladder completely. If you are postmenopausal, the tissues of your vaginal and vulvar may thin, leading to more frequent bladder infections.

    If you are a man, your risk of bladder infection increases if you have a bacterial infection in the prostate. Obstruction from a kidney stone, or a physical abnormality that allows fecal matter to flow into the bladder from the intestine, may all cause a bladder infection. The insertion of a catheter or another medical instrument may also increase the risk of bacterial infection.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A
    Bladder infections are much more common in women. Also referred to as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder, these infections are caused by bacteria that make their way into the urethra.

    Women have a shorter urethra, the tube that carries urine out of the bladder. The shorter passageway makes it easier for bacteria from other parts of the body to invade the urinary tract.

    Bladder infections are not serious if treated right away. But they tend to come back in some people. They rarely lead to kidney infections, which is much more serious.

    In men, a bladder infection may be a symptom of an underlying disorder and is generally a cause for concern.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Because the kidneys become enlarged while infected, your back will be swollen and tender to the touch. An infection in the ureters can result in spasms that will cause you extreme pain in the abdominal region. Nausea and vomiting can cause discomfort in the upper region of the abdomen. Fever and chills can leave you weak and lethargic.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    A pregnant woman who has a kidney infection may give birth to a baby with low weight. Certain antibiotics should not be used by women who are pregnant. You will need to discuss other options with your doctor if you develop a kidney infection while pregnant. Furthermore, you should not try to get pregnant while taking an antibiotic.