Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

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    With urinary tract infections (UTIs), some people have no symptoms, but most have one or more of the following:
    • an urgent need to urinate, often with only a few drops of urine that pass
    • a burning feeling when they urinate
    • cloudy urine or some blood in their urine
    • strong odor to the urine
    If the infection spreads to the kidneys and becomes more severe, it may cause pain in the lower back as well as fever, chills, nausea and vomiting. See your doctor immediately if you have any of these symptoms.
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    AJayram Krishnan, DO, Urology, answered on behalf of Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center
    Why Is It Important to See a Doctor for Urinary Tract Infections?
    An untreated urinary tract infection can infect the kidneys, so it's important to see your doctor, says Jayram Krishnan, DO, a urologist at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he explains that kidney infection can lead to hospitalization.  
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    AJayram Krishnan, DO, Urology, answered on behalf of Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center
    What Do Changes in Urine Indicate?
    Change in your urine's color or smell can indicate a urinary tract infection, says Jayram Krishnan, DO, a urologist at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he encourages people to know their own bodies so they can recognize changes.
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    AGrace Hyun, MD, Surgery, answered on behalf of The Mount Sinai Health System
    Often urinary tract infection (UTI) is the first sign of a congenital bladder or kidney anomaly. These UTIs may go undiagnosed if there is not a proper examination of the urine. If a true UTI exists then renal and bladder ultrasound as well as a VCUG should be performed to rule out any renal or bladder anomalies. Thirty to forty percent of children with a UTI accompanied by a high fever will have some type of urologic anomaly from birth.
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    A Michael Roizen, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Antibiotics are most beneficial during the first 6 months of treatment. That's when a urinary tract infection (UTI) is most likely to stage a comeback in infection-prone kids. Long-term antibiotic use in children with UTIs has been linked to antibiotic resistance (when wily germs mutate to the point that they laugh off an antibiotic).

    If your child has a normal urinary tract, she may be able to prevent future infections by following a few simple rules:
    • Go when she needs to go. Holding it till she's doing the pee-pee dance outside the bathroom can cause urine to back up and allow bacteria to thrive.
    • Clean properly. Children need to be taught to wipe front to back after urinating to avoid carrying bacteria from the rectum to the urinary tract.
    • Avoid bubble baths and strong soaps. Both can irritate the urethra and make it painful to urinate. If she tries not to go because of this, it increases her UTI risk.

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    ARealAge answered

    Menopausal women are more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs). The primary symptoms are painful urination or a need to urinate and void frequently. This problem is encountered more frequently after the age of 60 (i.e., after menopause) but may occur earlier. UTIs may be brought on by loss of estrogen and the resulting skin and glandular thinning around the urethra. Estrogen replenishment or local estrogen treatment may reduce the likelihood of urinary tract infections.

  • 1 Answer
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    Call or go to the doctor or clinic if you think you have a bladder infection (urinary tract infection). Only a doctor can give you medicine to cure a UTI. If you can't reach the doctor or clinic, go to an urgent-care clinic or to the hospital.

    To treat pain while you wait for medical care, use acetaminophen (like Tylenol) or ibuprofen (like Advil). Follow the instructions for timing and dose. Do not give aspirin to a child or teen -- it increases risk for a serious problem called Reye's syndrome.
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    A Leopold Galland, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Like their cousins, cranberries, blueberries contain flavonoids that can prevent urinary tract infection. Blueberry flavonoids prevent bacteria that cause urinary infections from binding to the lining of the bladder and can even inhibit the growth of bacteria.
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    A Mehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Bladder issues, such as frequent urination or burning, may mean your body is signaling a spreading urinary tract infection. Many women experience UTI, or a bacterial infection of the bladder. Sometimes the bacteria can ascend to the uterus, releasing pus into the kidneys and even spreading into the blood. In a worst-case scenario, what started as a normal UTI can lead to organ failure.

    How do you know if you have a typical UTI or if your body is alerting you to something more serious? If, in addition to typical bladder issues, you experience fever, a rapid heart rate, rapid breathing, or back pain, see your doctor as it may be a sign your UTI is spreading and should be treated immediately with antibiotics.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A Robin Miller, MD, Internal Medicine, answered

    A urinary tract infection in men is diagnosed the same way that it is in women. If a man has symptoms his urine will be collected and examined for the presence of white blood cells and bacteria. If present, most providers will request a culture to see what bacteria has caused the infection and which antibiotic will be the best choice to treat the infection.

    If a kidney infection is suspected, further studies may be performed such as an ultrasound or CT scan of the kidneys, ureters and bladder.