Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

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    Your appointment will go smoothly if you are well prepared and know what to expect. Take a friend or relative along with you so they can hear information that you might miss. Tell the doctor pertinent information, such as, your symptoms, the medications you are on presently, possibility for STDs, a new job, or any other stressors that could be important. Prepare questions ahead of time so you can obtain the answers you need.

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    You can prevent a kidney infection by following a few good practices. Drink lots of fluids, particularly water, so that bacteria can be washed away when you urinate. Make sure you urinate often and never hold it in if possible. Wipe yourself from front to back after urinating or defecating. This will help to prevent bacteria around your anus from traveling to your urethra. Steer clear of feminine douches and sprays. Finally, after sexual intercourse, urinate as soon as possible to kill any bacteria that may have found its way into your urethra.

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    Bladder cancer begins in the lining of the bladder and often shows symptoms similar to bladder infection, but the two are not directly related. Bladder cancer is caused by abnormal cell growth and blood in the urine is one of the first symptoms. Bladder infections are most commonly caused by bacteria and blood in the urine is a less common symptom. Recurring bladder infections may indicate bladder cancer, but only a doctor can confirm the cause of your bladder infection. If you experience painful urination, blood in the urine, frequent urination, or abdominal pain, consult your physician.

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    A bladder infection is usually a localized infection. The bladder is part of the urinary system and is connected to the kidney by the ureters and to the urethra, which moves urine to the outside of the body. A bladder infection may cause burning during urination, an uncontrollable urge to urinate with only small amounts of urine being passed at one time, pain in the pelvic area, or a general feeling of illness. A bladder infection, if left untreated, may spread to any part of the urinary system and cause several complications if it reaches the kidneys.

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    A pregnant woman who has a kidney infection may give birth to a baby with low weight. Certain antibiotics should not be used by women who are pregnant. You will need to discuss other options with your doctor if you develop a kidney infection while pregnant. Furthermore, you should not try to get pregnant while taking an antibiotic.

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    Because the kidneys become enlarged while infected, your back will be swollen and tender to the touch. An infection in the ureters can result in spasms that will cause you extreme pain in the abdominal region. Nausea and vomiting can cause discomfort in the upper region of the abdomen. Fever and chills can leave you weak and lethargic.

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    You may need to be hospitalized and given antibiotics intravenously if your kidney infection is severe. Your infection might be resistant to the usual antibiotics delaying treatment and leaving you susceptible to kidney damage or failure. Septicemia, a bacterial infection in the blood, may occur if your kidney infection is not treated and can lead to death.

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    Symptoms of a bladder infection may be minor and go unnoticed. Most people experience pain and burning during urination and an urge to urinate often. Despite the urge to urinate, sufferers may be unable to pass more than a small amount of urine. Urine may appear cloudy, or even red, if there is any blood present. You may feel pressure near the pubic bone or lower back. Fever is not a common symptom, except in children, but you might feel generally ill. Children may experience a loss of appetite or loose bowels.

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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered

    Unfortunately for us gals, our anatomy is our destiny. Because our urethra is so short (three to five centimeters), it is very easy for bacteria to travel the small distance from our anus to our urethra and enter our bladder, especially if we aren’t careful about wiping from front to rear. Bacteria may also be pushed into our bladder during sexual intercourse. An overgrowth of bacteria in the urine is an indication of a urinary tract infection (UTI) a.k.a. cystitis a.k.a. bladder infection.

    Women at risk for a UTI may: void infrequently, allowing for a build up of bacteria in their stagnant urine that can inflame the bladder or infect the urethra; be lax about wiping properly after a bowel movement; use a diaphragm that irritates them or that is improperly cleaned; and/or engage in rough sex that bruises the urethra or causes swelling and inflammation in the vaginal area. You will know when you have a UTI, because you will feel the urge to urinate very frequently, yet you will generally void only small amounts of urine. You may also experience burning, pain, or dysuria.

    A UTI is diagnosed by means of urinanalysis, which detects the presence of bacteria in the urine. The infection is then treated with an antibiotic. Once you’ve had a UTI, you will never forget the uncomfortable, unpleasant experience.

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    A fever may, but does not always, accompany a bladder infection. Children may sometimes run a fever with a bladder infection. Other signs to watch for include nausea, smelly urine, or loss of appetite. If your child has a high fever without signs of a cold for more than a day, consult a doctor to check for a bladder infection. Fever is not a common sign of bladder infection for adults but may occur, especially if the infection has spread.