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News: Health Experts Urge Americans to Move More, Sit Less

News: Health Experts Urge Americans to Move More, Sit Less

Federal health officials have updated their fitness recommendations for all Americans for the first time in 10 years.

Americans need to move more and sit less. That’s the clear-cut message from government health officials who updated their long-standing physical activity guidelines for the first time in a decade.

Adults should still get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week, or at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity. Keep in mind if you can get closer to 300 minutes of week of moderate exercise or 150 minutes of more strenuous activity, it’s even better. In fact, the more exercise you get, the greater the health benefits, experts advise.

But this activity doesn’t have to be done in bouts lasting at least 10 minutes, as previously specified. Health officials now say that every bit of exercise counts towards your weekly goal—even just a two-minute walk.

“These updated recommendations reflect how important physical activity is to our physical, mental and cognitive health and wellbeing across the entire lifespan,” says Lindsay Peral, MD, medical director for Executive Health at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Any amount of exercise counts
The updated exercise guidelines are based on new scientific evidence that’s been compiled since the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) first issued formal guidelines back in 2008. The key takeaway: any amount of physical activity is better than none.

“As a medical provider who focuses on wellness and disease prevention, I appreciate the common-sense approach,” Dr. Peral says. “I also believe that small but intentional positive lifestyle changes will gradually lead to meaningful changes in health habits and behaviors, which will further enhance our overall health and wellness.”

Moderate-intensity activities include doubles tennis, recreational swimming and brisk walking. Running, swimming laps or taking a challenging fitness class are considered vigorous physical activity, according to the DHHS. But a short walk, for example, could provide some immediate health benefits, including a reduction in stress and blood pressure as well as increased alertness, Peral notes.

Bottom line: it’s great if you’re able to run a marathon or spend two hours at the gym, but even climbing a flight of stairs has health benefits. Shoveling, gardening, taking your dog for a walk and low-impact activities all count as exercise that will work toward reducing your risk for a slew of chronic health issues, like heart disease and diabetes.

The health benefits are substantial
“Recent data has revealed much broader benefits of exercise in terms of improving our brain health, reducing our risk for certain types of cancers, improving our sleep and our mood and overall improving the quality of our lives,” Peral notes.

Research conducted over the past 10 years suggests that in addition to reducing the risk for heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes, regular physical activity is also linked to a lower risk for eight different forms of cancer, including cancers of the bladder, breast, colon, endometrium, esophagus, kidney, lung and stomach.

There is also more evidence of the brain-boosting benefits of exercise, the DHHS points out. Physical activity could help you sleep and think better and reduce your risk for dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. More recent studies have also established a link between exercise and mental health, suggesting that being active can ease anxiety and reduce the risk for depression.

What else is new?
The revised physical activity guidelines continue to advise adults to do muscle-strengthening activities at least two days per week. Older people should also add balance training to their weekly aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities to help reduce their risk for falls and fall-related injuries.

Kids and teenagers between 6 and 17 years old should engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on a daily basis but also fit in muscle-building and bone-strengthening activities at least three days per week.

Health officials also encourage even younger children to adopt an active lifestyle. The new guidelines recommend that preschoolers between 3 and 5 years old be physically active throughout the day.  

Pregnant and postpartum women should also aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise each week.

How do Americans measure up?
Unfortunately, only 26 percent of men and 19 percent of women are meeting these new fitness standards, the DHHS reports. As of 2015, young people weren’t faring much better. The latest data available suggests that only 20 percent of adolescents are sufficiently active.

“This suggests that as a nation, we are putting ourselves at higher risk for having worse physical, mental and cognitive health as a direct result of our sedentary lifestyles,” Peral says.

Meanwhile, the DHHS reports that about half of American adults have one or more preventable chronic diseases—but seven of the 10 most common chronic health conditions could be improved with physical activity.

Americans’ sedentary lifestyles and poor health are taking an economic toll as well. The DHHS calculates that American’s lack of physical activity, in particular, is linked to nearly $117 billion in yearly healthcare costs.

How to get started safely
Physical activity can help people improve their health and lower healthcare costs associated with obesity and sedentary behavior, but health officials also stress the important of safety when participating in any type of activity.

If you’re planning to engage in any fitness program or activity, the DHHS recommends that you take the following precautions:

  • Choose activities that match your current fitness level and health goals.
  • If you’re going to increase the intensity or duration of your physical activities, do so gradually over time.
  • When participating in any activity, be sure to wear the appropriate gear and safety equipment.
  • Follow all the rules for your activity and make smart decisions about when, where and how to participate.

Pregnant women and those with chronic health issues or symptoms should talk to their doctor before starting or changing an exercise regimen. They should ask about the types of activities that are appropriate for them and how much they can do safely.