Trans Fats

Trans Fats

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    A , Fitness, answered
    Trans fat or trans-fatty acid is a type of fat that, research reveals, is a dangerous substance produced in the process of hydrogenation. It's not only saturated fats in animal products or hydrogenated vegetable oils that are bad for health; so are these trans-fatty acids.

    The Nurses' Health Study of some 85,000 women found that subjects who consumed large amounts of margarine and shortening used in cookies, bread, and other baked goods had a 70 percent higher risk of heart disease than women who used little or none.

    Another study of the dietary habits of 239 heart attack patients and 282 healthy people looked at the amount of trans-fatty acids in their diets and found that the risk of heart attack was twice as high among those who consumed the most trans-fatty acids compared with those who consumed the least.
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Many fast-food restaurants cook food in trans fat to produce the flavor of food cooked in lard, the ingredient used before consumers became concerned about saturated fats. Although the move away from lard was supposed to be good for our health, most french fries at your local burger joint contain as much or more artery-clogging fat as if they had been fried in lard. Even the chicken at most fast-food restaurants, an option you might think would be healthier than a burger, is almost always high in fat, often containing more fat than a full steak dinner.
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  • 6 Answers
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of

    Animal products like beef, pork, lamb, butter, and milk naturally contain trans fat but it is a different form than synthetically produced trans fat found in refined/packaged food (cakes, cookies, crackers, snack food and fried fast food). Foods that have been partially hydrogenated will also contain trans fat like stick margarine, vegetable shortening. A food label that indicates 0 trans fats means the product has less than .5 grams of trans fat per serving. 

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  • 5 Answers
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Trans fats raises your bad cholesterol increasing the risk of having a heart disease. Your body does not need trans fats and the less you eat it the better for you. By limiting your intake of highly processed foods such as: commercial baked goods, chips, fast-food fried chicken, stick margarine and potpies and eating more whole foods (fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains) you can avoid trans fats.

    If you read hydrogenated, partially hydrogenated or shortening on the label; the product contains trans fats and it needs to be avoided.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    There's preliminary evidence that trans fatty acids, found in partially hydrogenated fats and oils, may contribute to belly fat. In animal studies, including some in primates (monkeys), diets rich in trans fats led to more belly fat, even when calories didn't go up. The high-trans-fat diet also increased insulin resistance, which increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and may contribute to obesity. There are no magic bullets in weight loss, but choosing foods that contain no trans fats may be good not only for your heart but for weight control.
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that trans fat was a contributing factor to coronary heart disease. If a product says it contains few or zero grams of trans fat, look at the nutrition label. Often it will be loaded with saturated fat, which can be just as unhealthful as trans fat. Example: One popular frozen snack makes the "zero trans fat" claim on the front of the label, but the nutrition facts panel shows it has 17 grams of saturated fat, 80 percent of the daily value of fat a person should consume.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Sugar, salt, fat -- there’s a lot of offenders lurking in your packaged food. The worst of them all is hydrogenated oil. This ingredient extends the shelf life of foods by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil. In its natural liquid state, vegetable oil is easily digested by your body, but it spoils very quickly in packaged food. Once modified and hardened, hydrogenated oil will never go bad; this substance poses a huge threat to your health.

    Also known as trans fat, hydrogenated oil is the worst kind of fat. Eating just 1 gram of trans fat a day can increase your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and even some cancers. Shockingly, many of your favorite processed snacks contain trans fat, even if it’s not listed on the label. This misleading packaging is the result of a loophole in the FDA’s guidelines. The administration allows manufacturers to round down the quantity of ingredients, so foods that contain less than half a gram of trans fats can be labeled as zero grams. This allows many manufacturers to sneak in trans fats without most people realizing what they’re eating. With just 3 servings of these foods a day, you’ll surpass your limit of trans fats. That’s why you need to avoid foods that contain the words “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” on the label.

    The big culprits of hidden trans fats are chips, crackers and microwave popcorn. There are plenty of healthy options if you know how to avoid hydrogenated oils and trans fats. Read the ingredient listings when picking snacks and consider buying your own popcorn maker. Ranging in cost from $20-$40, this easy appliance allows you to make your own additive-free, healthy popcorn.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    The best advice is to cut out as much saturated fat and trans fat from your diet as possible. Use liquid vegetable oils in recipes that call for butter or margarine. Make substitutions. If you decide to eat margarine, buy liquid or tub margarine. The first ingredient listed in the fine print should be water, vegetable oil, or a vegetable oil blend.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Health news seems to be full of gloom and doom much of the time, so brace yourself for some good tidings: Americans cut their intake of deadly trans fat by an incredible 58% between 2000 and 2009, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trans fat is the type found in partially hydrogenated oils, which are used to prepare all kinds of fast foods (like French fries and fried fish) and packaged desserts and snacks, among other foods. These oils provide a nice texture and extend shelf life, but they have another rather unfortunate quality: They plug up your arteries like a cork in a bottle of Chardonnay, making you more likely to develop heart disease.

    Growing awareness about the trans fat threat has led communities across the United States to pass laws prohibiting the use of partially hydrogenated oil. Some food companies and restaurants have stopped using them simply because it's good public policy and doesn't hurt relations to let you know they care about you. Many fellow consumers are reading ingredients lists and avoiding foods that contain the evil oils. Whatever the reason these very bad fats are disappearing,  preventing thousands of heart attacks each year.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    To hydrogenate fat or make trans fat, food manufacturers forcibly unpair the carbon double bonds in a polyunsaturated fat and force them to bond with hydrogen atoms. This means they're taking a very unstable fat and artificially making it more stable. In a partially hydrogenated fatty acid, only some carbon molecules have been saturated with hydrogen and carbon-pair bonds remain. In a fully hydrogenated fatty acid, all carbon double bonds have been replaced with hydrogen bonds. This process creates what I call a "Franken-fat," a fat that does not exist in nature and is totally unrecognizable, unusable, and actually quite damaging to the body.