Trans Fats

Trans Fats

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    The best advice is to cut out as much saturated fat and trans fat from your diet as possible. Use liquid vegetable oils in recipes that call for butter or margarine. Make substitutions. If you decide to eat margarine, buy liquid or tub margarine. The first ingredient listed in the fine print should be water, vegetable oil, or a vegetable oil blend.

  • 4 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Trans fatty acids are unhealthy processed fats found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and shortening. Partially hydrogenated oils are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated vegetable oils that have been chemically altered to be made more solid or semi-solid at room temperature.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    To hydrogenate fat or make trans fat, food manufacturers forcibly unpair the carbon double bonds in a polyunsaturated fat and force them to bond with hydrogen atoms. This means they're taking a very unstable fat and artificially making it more stable. In a partially hydrogenated fatty acid, only some carbon molecules have been saturated with hydrogen and carbon-pair bonds remain. In a fully hydrogenated fatty acid, all carbon double bonds have been replaced with hydrogen bonds. This process creates what I call a "Franken-fat," a fat that does not exist in nature and is totally unrecognizable, unusable, and actually quite damaging to the body.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Studies show that the more trans fat a person consumes, the faster the cardiovascular system ages. In one study of more than eighty-five thousand participants, women who consumed more than four teaspoons of margarine a day had a 70 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease than those who rarely consumed margarine at all. That makes those fifty-five-year-old women 2.7 years older than if they used olive oil. Some researchers have attributed as many as 50,000 deaths a year to trans fat consumption.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of

    Trans fats are one type of fatty acid formed during the processing of partial hydrogenation. They are found naturally in some foods but mostly from foods that are partially hydrogenated. Trans fats act like saturated fat in the body and tend to raise blood cholesterol levels. Saturated fats trigger the liver to make more total and LDL (lousy cholesterol) cholesterol.

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    Trans fats are similar in structure to saturated fats, and they also raise levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad," cholesterol. Trans fats may also raise blood triglycerides and lower high density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good," cholesterol.
  • 12 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Trans fat used to be called "the hidden fat" because it wasn't listed on food labels until 2005. If one of the first five ingredients on a label is milk fat, fat from four-legged animals saturated fat, or partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, don't buy that product. Saturated and trans fats turn on genes that increase protein production, and this in turn causes or contributes to inflammation of the arteries. Inflammation of your arteries is one of the major causes of aging you will want to avoid. This increased aging of the arteries and immune system makes you slower today and more likely to experience impotence, wrinkling of the skin, heart disease, stroke, memory loss, serious infections, and cancer.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    A recent Spanish study looked at more than 12,000 people. It revealed a 48% increase in rates of depression in people who had higher levels of trans fats in their blood. It seems these unhealthy fats can increase inflammation in the brain, creating unhealthy blood vessels and poor circulation in the brain -- both of which can contribute to mood problems. Since brain tissue is made mostly of fat, it makes sense that better-quality fat makes a better brain. In light of this research, the years of hydrogenated peanut butter and trans-fatty snack foods may be coming to a mood-lifting close.
  • 4 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    You can figure out if a food contains trans fat by doing a little detective work. On the information label, find the total fat content. Then, subtract the saturated fat and the mono and polyunsaturated fats. This leaves the trans fat. So, for example, if chocolate chip cookies have 12 grams of fat per serving and the label lists 4 grams of saturated fat, the cookies also have 8 grams of artery-aging trans fat.

    Another way to tell is to look at the list of ingredients. A food label must list the ingredients in order of quantity, from most to least. If hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils are listed early on the list and before polyunsaturated or monounsaturated oils, you know the product contains lots of trans fat. If the label lists unsaturated or monounsaturated oils, olive oil, or canola oil first, the fats are probably okay. Some experts contend that trans fats make up 25 to 60 percent of all fats contained in processed food, and 15 to 30 percent of the total intake of dietary fat. Others disagree, saying the numbers are much lower.
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  • 13 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Trans fat (also called trans fatty acid) is created when unsaturated fats are hydrogenated (combined with hydrogen), a chemical process that causes fats that would normally be liquid at room temperature to become solid. Any fat we eat that is liquid when heated but that hardens when cooled to room temperature is made of either saturated or trans fat. Here's good rule for remembering if a fat is good for you: If it's solid at room temperature, it will age you. Stick margarine is a trans fat. So is the fat in donut glaze. Trans fats, like saturated fats, alter basic metabolic pathways, causing a rise in overall cholesterol levels, particularly the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (lousy) cholesterol in your bloodstream.
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