Sun Care

Sun Care

Sun Care
Proper sun care is essential because of wrinkles and dangers like melanoma. Experts estimate that more than 90 percent of skin cancers stem from overexposure to tanning beds and the suns ultraviolet radiation. Wear protective clothing and sunscreen outdoors, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the suns rays are strongest. Choose a sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays with an SPF of 15 or higher. Apply about 15 to 30 minutes before going outside, then reapply every two hours.

Recently Answered

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Roizen - New York expands tanning booth ban
    New Yorkers under the age of 17 won't be able to get their summer glow from a tanning bed. In this Treadmill Talk, Dr. Michael Roizen explains why keeping kids away from tanning beds is important and how you can get a safe tan.
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    A , Midwifery Nursing, answered
    Paula Greer - Should women tan while pregnant?

    Whether you're pregnant or not, tanning can increase your risk of skin cancer -- and when there's a baby on board you're more likely to burn. Learn more by watching this video featuring
    nurse midwife Paula Greer.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    How does tanning cause skin damage?
    Tanning causes skin damage by burning the skin; multiple burns then accumulate over time, which causes premature aging and skin cancer. In this video, dermatologist Doris Day, MD, explains why tanning is so dangerous and damaging to our skin. 
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    Teenagers coveting bronzed skin are likely to sunbathe or patronize tanning salons. Researchers believe that increasing UV exposure may have caused the marked increase in melanoma incidence noted among women born after 1965. Tanning salons expose the skin to as much as 15 times more UV radiation than the sun and likely contribute to the melanoma increase.

    Self-tanning, or sunless tanning, products are not a good alternative. Many chemicals in self-tanning products have not been tested for safety. Dihydroxyacetone, a self-tanning chemical most frequently found in these products, is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use around the eyes. 

    To parents of teens: Be good role models -- let your teen see that you protect yourself from the sun. Having a tan does not mean a person is healthy.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Here are some of the risks one takes by getting as tan from a tanning bed:
    • Skin Cancer: You're looking at a 75% increased risk in skin cancer, including malignant melanoma, from frequenting tanning beds. All of my melanoma patients in their 20s have been young women who frequented tanning parlors.
    • Wrinkles: Your skin will prematurely age, and wrinkles become more exaggerated if you go to a tanning bed. Why hasten the onset of wrinkles by working on your tan?
    • Decreased Immunity: Ultraviolet light, particularly ultraviolet-A (UVA), diminishes the ability of the T cell to function appropriately. That's one of the reasons medical UVA is used in the treatment of such severe skin diseases as T cell lymphoma and generalized psoriasis. But do you really want to decrease your body's ability to fight infection or early forming cancer? It may seem strange but skin cancer is caused by two events caused by UVA light. The cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and the reduced immune system ability to destroy these early cancer cells.
    • Skin Texture: If you want your skin to be weathered, lined and leathery later in life, the tanning bed is the way to go. There's a reason our great grandmothers tried to avoid the sun, wore their bonnets and took milk baths. They were trying to keep their skin soft and youthful.
    • Formation of Superficial Blood Vessels: Years of sun damage are often the reason baby boomers notice those fine "broken" blood vessels (really telangiectasias). Many may blame rosacea but the truth is that sun damage is a far more likely culprit.
    • Skin Discoloration: You may be on hormones, you may be pregnant, but you're not going to develop melasma and freckles without the main component: sunlight. Increase the intensity and voilà, you've got blotchy skin.
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    If you just can’t stop tanning, start keeping a journal of your feelings, and try to pinpoint the reasons for your habit. If stress jumps out, try exchanging your UV fix for a walk in a natural setting or try lightbox therapy. You can purchase or rent a light box that emits visible light (with UV filters that block the radiation). Bright-light therapy has many uses, such as aiding in jet lag, seasonal blues, low mood, fatigue, and resetting your circadian rhythm.

    From The Mind-Beauty Connection: 9 Days to Less Stress, Gorgeous Skin, and a Whole New You by Amy Wechsler.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Any tanning is too much. A tan is a sign of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and the damage that comes with it. Whether your tan comes from the sun or a tanning salon, tanning increases the risk of premature skin aging, deep wrinkles, and skin cancer. 
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    If you like the look of a suntan, try the sunless tanning products that are now available. They are safe and create a very natural-looking “tan” without the damage of sun exposure.

    Hundreds of products are available that offer a quick, easy way to get the color of a suntan you want without the sun damage. The active ingredient in sunless tanners is dihydroxyacetone, or DHA. This is a simple nontoxic ingredient that stains the upper layers of the skin to create brown or golden brown compounds. Most self tanners have concentrations of between 2% and 5% DHA. The deeper the tanning product, the more concentrated the DHA. Other ingredients may be added in as well, such as sunscreen and fragrance to make products more enticing.

    The more you use the sunless tanners, the better you get at applying them evenly, which means that there will be less of a problem with streak marks or other problems from unevenness of the application. There are also salons and spas that offer “bronzing” sessions at a relatively reasonable price (usually less expensive than the cost of a tanning session).


    100 Questions & Answers About Acne
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Tanning salons use lamps that emit both UVA and UVB radiation, the two types of UV radiation that penetrate the skin. UV-B rays penetrate the top layers of skin and are most responsible for sunburns. UV-A rays penetrate to the deeper layers of the skin and are often associated with allergic reactions.
    In May 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the first time said that tanning beds and sun lamps should not be used by people under the age of 18. The FDA is proposing such a warning for marketing materials and websites that promote indoor tanning.
    Regulators are also proposing that manufacturers meet certain safety and design requirements, such as timers and limits on radiation emitted. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organization, has reported that tanning devices emit UV radiation and are more dangerous than previously thought. Four years ago, the IARC moved these devices into the highest cancer risk category.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Tanning beds may be more dangerous because they mainly produce ultraviolet A (UVA) rays. While both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation can be harmful to skin, UVA penetrates skin more deeply and may cause additional cellular damage as a result.

    Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing to safeguard your skin from the sun's harmful rays.

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