Skin Moisturizing

Skin Moisturizing

Skin Moisturizing
Moisturizers can treat try skin and conditions like eczema, offer some sun protection and improve the appearance of skin all over your body. A basic moisturizer helps hold water in the skin's outer layers. Emollients fill in tiny crevices between surfaces to keep skin smooth, while humectants draw water to the outermost layer of your skin for a dewy glow. Depending on your skin type, you may not need to moisturize your face or other areas as often as others. Your moisturizing routine could change based on the time of year and your environment. Find out more about moisturizers and how to apply them with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    A man should moisturize by applying the moisturizer when the skin is damp, such as after a bath or shower. Men with very dry skin should apply moisturizer more than once a day. Men with oily skin should apply moisturizer less frequently and use a moisturizer with less oil, such as a light cream or lotion. Skin can become very dry in the winter and it's important to moisturize during this time of year. It's a good idea to talk with your dermatologist about the best skincare products for your skin.
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    The type of moisturizer that's best for you and your skin depends on your skin type, skin conditions, age, and the desired effect of your moisturizer. Oil-based moisturizers stay on your skin longer, but water-based moisturizers are less greasy and easier to apply. People with normal skin will likely do best with a water-based moisturizer. People with oily skin can use a light, non-comedogenic moisturizer sparingly. People with dry skin or people who are older may want to use an oil-based moisturizer because their skin produces less oil. If you are allergic to fragrances or preservatives, make sure your moisturizer doesn't contain these substances.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Everyone benefits from moisturizer. No matter your skin type - dry, oily, combination or normal-moisturizing helps restore a balance that's easily affected by daily activities, such as exercise or sun exposure. To keep your skin healthy, find a moisturizer designed for your skin type and make its application a part of your everyday routine.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    If you have a known fragrance allergy or tend to react to products that contain fragrance, shop for products that say fragrance-free on the label.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    A separate product for the skin around your eyes contains more potent ingredients that moisturize the area. Learn more from our contributors, reducing signs of aging such as fine lines and wrinkles. However, the results you see from such a product will be subtle.
     
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    Safflower oil is high in moisturizing linoleic acid. When you get out of the shower today, have some ready to slather on those trouble spots. You can, if you choose, use it on any dry body part, but stay below the neck. It’s my favorite for dry lower legs, where flakiness can be especially persistent. The oil is pressed from the seeds of spiky yellow safflowers; in theory you could use olive oil, too, which is also high in linoleic acid, but you’d smell like a salad. Along with being odorless, safflower oil has the advantages of being colorless and cheap.

    If you are not sure about moisturizing with pure cooking oil (and the beauty industry sincerely hopes you aren’t), you can find safflower oil in moisturizers, lip balms, and scrubs. Look for a product that lists it among the first three ingredients, which means it contains a high concentration of the oil. Otherwise, just pour some safflower oil into a pretty little squeeze bottle and add it to your toiletries. No one will ever guess you cook with it, too! And your legs will look amazing.

    From The Mind-Beauty Connection: 9 Days to Less Stress, Gorgeous Skin, and a Whole New You by Amy Wechsler.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    No, putting water on the skin will not increase its moisture-holding capacity. In reality, spraying water on skin can cause it to become too wet for too long (known as maceration), exposing the protective barrier to tearing or other damage.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    No, adding water alone to skin will not help to moisturize it. Water should be applied to the skin with humectants, in order for it to be absorbed.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Should I switch my skin moisturizers for the seasons?

    When the seasons change, you should also change your facial moisturizer; in the winter you want a heavier cream, and in warmer months you want a thinner lotion or serum. Watch dermatologist Debra Jaliman, MD, describe the ingredients to look for.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Wintertime is hard on skin. When the air becomes cold and dry and the heat is turned on indoors, skin becomes dry. Activities and products that may not normally irritate skin in other seasons can result in skin drying and irritation.

    The fingers, especially around the nails, are vulnerable to winter weather. Skin can become rough and red, and cracks can develop that are quite painful. Frequent hand washing can lead to "hand eczema" (skin inflammation), especially if you use strong soaps or your hands are in dish detergent water without the protection of rubber gloves. Perfumed lotions can also cause irritation.

    To protect your hands, use a mild, unscented soap for washing hands and an unscented moisturizer afterwards. Apply white petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or Bacitracin ointment to cracks in your fingers. For excessively dry hands, apply moisturizer or Vaseline at night to your hands and cover your hands with white cotton gloves. For reddened, irritated skin, hydrocortisone cream can be helpful. You can buy this without a prescription.

    If irritation does not go away, see your doctor. He or she may be able to prescribe creams or ointments to help.
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