Skin Injury

Skin Injury

Skin Injury
Not all skin injuries are cuts and scrapes. Heat, friction and pressure can cause skin injuries like burns, sunburn and blisters. A burn is a traumatic skin injury caused by a heat source like scalding liquid or a hot pot, a radiation source like the suns rays, an electrical source like open wiring or a chemical source like acid. Depending on the severity of the burn, treatment can include wound care and pain management, skin grafting, intravenous fluids or cosmetic surgery. Some burns can form blisters, which actually act as a protective, fluid-filled buffer for damaged skin. Blisters also form from skin conditions like eczema and friction sources like ill-fitting shoes. Keeping the area clean with antibiotics and a dressing or bandage is usually enough to heal a blister.

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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of

    If your incision is closed with Steri-Strips:

    • Wash your incision gently with mild soap and water. Gently dry the area. You may shower two days after your implant, but do not directly spray or scrub your incision.
    • Allow the Steri-Strips to fall off; do not pull them off.
    • If you have a clear dressing over the incision, ask your doctor when it should be removed.

    Watch your incision for signs of infection such as fever, redness, swelling, tenderness, or drainage. Report these to your doctor right away.

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    In an open wound, the break in the skin can be as minor as a scrape of the surface layers or as severe as a deep penetration. The amount of bleeding depends on the location and severity of the injury.

    The four main types of open soft tissue wounds are abrasions, lacerations, avulsions, and punctures.
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    Arc Figure 7_6
    An avulsion is a serious soft-tissue injury. It happens when a portion of the skin, and sometimes other soft tissue, is partially or completely torn away.



    This type of injury often damages deeper tissues, causing significant bleeding. Sometimes a violent force may completely tear away a body part, including bone, such as a finger. This is known as an amputation.

    With amputations, sometimes bleeding is easier to control because the tissues close around the vessels at the injury site. If there is a violent tearing, twisting or crushing of the extremity, the bleeding may be hard to control. 
    Arc Figure 7_6
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    • You usually will be able to recognize the early signs of infection. The area around the wound becomes swollen and red.
    • The area may feel warm or throb with pain. Some wounds discharge pus.
    • Serious infections may cause a person to develop a fever and feel ill.
    • Red streaks may develop that progress from the wound toward the heart. If this happens, the infected person should seek immediate professional medical attention.
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    What can I do to reduce scarring after surgery?
    After surgery, Brandon Harrell, MD of Northeast Methodist Hospital recommends his patients apply medicated scar gel or vitamin E on the incision to reduce scarring. Watch this video to learn more.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    There are topical prescriptions, like creams with silicone, which may reduce the thickness of scars. Cortisone injections might also help. When a scar is indented, a doctor can use soft tissue fillers, like collagen, to fill out the area, but these injections must be repeated periodically. Dermabrasion can be used to "sand" the layers of skin and make it more even. The scar most likely won't disappear completely, but its appearance should be reduced.

     

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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered

    A scar can be defined as a mark left by a healed wound, sore or burn. The etiology of a scar include: traumatic laceration, burns, radiation damage, lasers, pressure necrosis, and crush injury. When wounds heal by secondary intention, without suture closure, a mark will be forever left behind. Types of scars include: keloids, hypertrophic scars, acne scars, hyper/hypo-pigmentation, and widespread scars. Scars are the inevitable tradeoff of my practice as a Plastic Surgeon. 

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    There are four main types of scars:
    • Keloid scars are raised and fleshy scars that protrude beyond the site of injury on the skin.
    • Contracture scars are sometimes deep scars that can occur from burns and may cause the skin to tighten. In some cases, the scars may limit normal mobility.
    • Hypertrophic scars are raised, red scars that are similar to keloids, but they don't extend beyond the site of injury. They may be helped by injections of corticosteroid medications.
    • Acne scars result from large acne lesions such as pustules and cysts.
    Consult your doctor or dermatologist for more information about scars.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    If you have a C-section scar or episiotomy tear, wash the wound briefly with warm water as often as you desire, but keep the wound dry otherwise. Change any dressings as often as they get moist. If you still feel excessive pain after a week to 10 days, you should contact your doctor to make sure there are no complications.

    For episiotomy tears (or if you have hemorrhoids), try soaking in sitz baths - a bath in which only your hips and buttocks are in the water - with added Epsom salts. This allows more blood to get to the infected area, which should improve healing. You will be given a squirt bottle to rinse the area after going to the bathroom; you can also use ice packs or witch-hazel pads to soothe the affected tissues. I recommend taking stool softeners to make sure there's little stretching of the area when you're trying to go to the bathroom (pressing a towel on the tear during a bowel movement can help relieve some pain by providing counter pressure).
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Often, when a scar is exposed to the sun's harsh ultraviolet rays, it sunburns more easily than the rest of your skin. The result is often a change in color, leaving your scar with a brown tint.

     

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