Why didn't my doctor prescribe antibiotics for my sinusitis?

When sinusitis is caused by a virus or irritation in the air (like cigarette smoke), antibiotics will not help it get better. Acute sinusitis will almost always get better on its own. It is better to wait and take antibiotics only when they are needed. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed can be harmful.
Each time you or your child takes an antibiotic, the bacteria that normally live in your body (on the skin, in the intestine, in the mouth and nose, etc.) are more likely to become resistant to antibiotics. Common antibiotics cannot kill infections caused by these resistant germs.
If symptoms continue for more than 10 days, schedule a follow-up appointment with a healthcare provider for re-evaluation to avoid any complications.

The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.

Continue Learning about Sinusitis

Sinusitis

If you are affected by sinusitis, you probably know where your sinuses are, lying in the bones around the nose. Sinusitis occurs when your sinuses become inflamed, sometimes after you come down with a virus or bacterial infection. ...

You might have sinusitis if you develop a fever, cough, nasal congestion, or postnasal drip at the same time. Sometimes sinusitis can make your head hurt, or make your sinuses feel sore. Some people with sinusitis also have problems with allergies. Talk to your doctor about treatment for sinusitis. Prescription and over-the-counter medications can help you with your symptoms.
More

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.