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Is grilled food safe to eat?

Grilled food is safe to eat if it has been heated high enough to kill any bacteria that may be on it. The best way to make sure meat is grilled to a safe temperature is to use a meat thermometer. Cook all raw beef, pork, lamb and veal steaks, chops, and roasts to a minimum internal temperature of 145° F as measured with a food thermometer before removing meat from the heat source. For safety and quality, allow meat to rest for at least three minutes before carving or consuming. Cook all raw ground beef, pork, lamb, and veal to an internal temperature of 160° F. Cook all poultry to a safe minimum internal temperature of 165° F. Meat such as hamburgers can turn brown before they reach the safe temperature, so just cutting the meat in the middle and looking at it is not a reliable method.
Grilled food is safe to eat once it has been cooked to a safe internal temperature. Don’t rely on 20:20 vision. The only way to tell if the meat is done is to use a thermometer. It is also important to keep moist disposable towelettes near the grill as a reminder to the grillmaster to clean his/her hands before touching the food. Wash the platter and utensils that touched the raw meat before using them again on the cooked meat. And, use a separate marinade if you plan on coating the meat again during grilling.

Go to this page for more information on safe grilling temperatures: http://bit.ly/KHhM1R
Marisa Moore
Nutrition & Dietetics
According to the USDA, studies suggest a link between cancer and charred meats and fish. Charring can occur as a result of high temperature cooking methods, such as grilling, frying and broiling.

Here are some tips to prevent your meats from charring:
  •   Remove fatty areas
  •   Pre-cook meat in the microwave immediately before placing it on the grill
  •   Make sure the coals of the grill are not directly below the meat
  •   Avoid grilling meats until they are well done or burned

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.