Root Canal Therapy

Root Canal Therapy

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  • 5 Answers
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    A Saul Miller, Dentist, answered

    Among the many things to consider regarding endodontic treatment are:

    • care in biting on the involved tooth during and after the treatment.
    • having the tooth properly restored after root canal treatment to minimize the chance of fracture. (A crown is often the restoration of choice.)
    • take any medication prescribed and as directed by your dentist.
    • take medication from your physician unless changes are advised.
    • follow dentists directions and ask about any concerns.
    • understand that the root canal treatment can be excellent, but the tooth can be lost if not sealed, restored and protected from fracture.

    You may wish to contact your dentist and ask him/her to provide you with information regarding endodontic treatment and your specific case. Information about benefits and risks of your care are also provided and reviewed in an informed consent prior to treatment.

     

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  • 2 Answers
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    Since it is virtually impossible to totally sterilize the complex root system of a tooth there will always be vital pathogens left in the root. From the time a person has a root canal the immune system will be occupied taking care of the situation. In a healthy person the root canal may be kept in check and be considered 'successful'. The thought of the tooth being a source of any number of illnesses seems logical. Unfortunately proving this seems near impossible. The problem should certainly be considered if you are considering this treatment.
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  • 4 Answers
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    A William M. Litaker, Dentist, answered

    Root canal treatment for a tooth is recommended by a dentist when a tooth is abscessed, decayed into the nerve, or broken into the nerve. A root canal removes the diseased or infected part of the tooth, and it removes the nerve from a severely broken tooth. This procedure allows the tooth to be saved. The tooth can then be either filled or crowned depending on the extent of the original decay or fracture. See your dentist if you think you need a root canal.

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  • 1 Answer
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    If you've recently had a root canal and are experiencing pain, swelling, bleeding or other problems with your teeth, you should contact your dentist. Regular checkups -- one to three -- are also needed following the procedure. A root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort.
  • 4 Answers
    A
    A William M. Litaker, Dentist, answered

    Root canal treatment is very similar to having a tooth filled. With a root canal, the root part of the tooth is filled rather than the top of the tooth. First, your dentist will numb your tooth. A dental handpiece will be used to make an opening into the infected part of the tooth, the pulp. A rubber shield called a rubber dam will be fitted over your tooth to keep the area sterile and protect you from the small instruments that will be used to shape the inside of the tooth. After the infected pulp and the canal have been shaped, a root canal filling will be placed into the tooth. The top part of the tooth may need a filling or a crown depending on the amount of destruction that occurred either from a cavity or breakage of the tooth.

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  • 4 Answers
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    A Philip Uffer, DDS, Dentist, answered
    The dentist first should determine if a root canal is needed. There are various tests that are performed to see if the tooth is a candidate for that procedure. The dentist will probably look at a radiograph, listen to what symptoms you may have (or may not have), and put all those puzzle pieces together to form a diagnosis and treatment.

    Nerves that are inflamed tend to be painful to temperature, pressure (chewing), and sometimes spontaneously hurt. You may even notice a pimple on your gum near the offending tooth. When the nerve has died, you may have no pain at all.

    The dentist will usually numb the tooth, and put a rubber dam (like a drop cloth) around the tooth before initiating the procedure.
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  • 5 Answers
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    A root canal procedure often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, your general dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in problems of the pulp) removes the diseased pulp (the soft tissue of a tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue). The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed.

    Here's how your tooth is saved through treatment:
    1. First, an opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
    2. The pulp is then removed. The root canal(s) is cleaned and shaped to a form that can be filled.
    3. Medications may be put in the pulp chamber and root canal(s) to help get rid of germs and prevent infection.
    4. A temporary filling will be placed in the crown opening to protect the tooth between dental visits. Your dentist may leave the tooth open for a few days to drain. You might also be given medicine to help control infection that may have spread beyond the tooth.
    5. The pulp chamber and root canals are filled and sealed.
    6. The temporary filling is removed and the pulp chamber and root canal(s) are cleaned and filled.
    7. In the final step, a gold or porcelain crown is usually placed over the tooth. If an endodontist performs the treatment, he or she will recommend that you return to your family dentist for this final step.
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  • 14 Answers
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    A Mark Birnbach, Dentist, answered
    Once the infected nerve tissue has been removed and the tooth sealed, the tooth can be restored with a crown. The gum and bone remain attached to the tooth, so other than not having the ability to experience pain, it will function just the same as other teeth that have not had a root canal.
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  • 15 Answers
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    A Mark Birnbach, Dentist, answered
    An endodontist is a dentist who specializes in only performing root canals.

    Any dentist who has had proper training can perform them as well.
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  • 1 Answer
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    ARealAge answered
    There are several possible complications of a dental root amputation. The main complication is that the tooth might later need to be extracted (removed). A dental root amputation is performed when one of the roots of a tooth is damaged, but the rest of the tooth is not. The goal of the procedure is to remove the damaged root while stabilizing the rest of the tooth so it can remain in place. If the tooth is not stable enough after the dental root amputation, it might need to be removed. If the area becomes infected, that might also result in the loss of the tooth.

    Another complication is that the surgeon could damage nearby teeth during the procedure, or make a small hole in the sinus if the surgery involves an upper molar. As with any dental surgery procedure, there’s always the possibility of bleeding, swelling, and pain after the procedure. If any of these seem excessive, contact your endodontist.