Puberty

Puberty

Puberty affects children between the ages of 11 and 14. The changes can be drastic and all at once, changing your physical growth, cognitive development, emotional and social skills, as well as sensory and motor development. Rapid changes often occur earlier in girl than in boys but both genders will go through physical and emotional changes that segue childhood into adulthood. If often is a difficult time of transition for the adolescent as well as the parents, but strong family support will reaffirm your childs sense of self.

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    When it comes to puberty, the absolute worst thing that can happen to a child is to be uninformed. A girl who hasn’t been taught about menstruation, for example, may believe there is something seriously wrong with her when it does occur. And that’s just the beginning. It’s an understatement to say that puberty is an overwhelming time for adolescents: Their bodies are changing and growing hair in places they’ve never imagined, their voices may be squeaking and growing deeper, and their skin -- well, that’s a whole story of it’s own!

    Rather than sitting your child down to have a one-time, complete and unabridged lecture, begin at an early age to establish an ongoing dialogue about puberty. The more comfortable you seem when you discuss the subject, the more at ease he or she will feel about it, too. While books on the subject shouldn’t serve as a substitute for honest communication between parent and child, reading them with your young child can help you both ease your way into further conversations. Older children, on the other hand, may be more comfortable reading about puberty on their own and coming to you with additional questions.

    From Good Kids, Bad Habits: The RealAge Guide to Raising Healthy Children by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

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    Puberty by definition is a stage of human development experienced by adolescents. Children undergo the changes, and parents must watch and guide them through the process. It can be awkward for parents and the child who is going through puberty. Parents should communicate with their children to ensure that their children understand what is happening to their bodies. Open communication can help children avoid emotional and behavioral issues sometimes associated with puberty. It also allows parents to offer accurate information and support.

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    The onset of puberty may be related to weight. Adolescents that are mildly to moderately overweight tend to begin puberty earlier. Adolescents with thinner physiques and lower body fat content may begin puberty later.

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    Doctors may prescribe synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (such as leuprolide, acetate, deslorelin, or histrelin) to slow early onset puberty. These medications stop the production of certain sex hormones. Supplemental sex hormones, such as testosterone may be used to initiate the process.

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    Dr. Ellen Rome - How are "wet dreams" and puberty related?
    Watch as Dr. Ellen Rome explains how "wet dreams" and puberty are related.

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    Most young girls begin breast development around age 11. That is followed by pubic hair growth and height increase. Menstruation starts for most girls around age 13. Following their first period, bone growth and breast development is completed.

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    The severity of early or delayed puberty depends largely on the cause. Since individuals develop at different rates, slightly early or delayed puberty is often not a problem. Early or precocious puberty can be caused by problems with the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus. Some rare conditions, including neurofibromatosis, may also be related to precocious puberty. Delayed puberty can be caused by chemotherapy, gene disorders, tumors, infections, and too much dieting or exercise.

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    The first thing you need to know is that puberty -- that time when girls and boys develop secondary sex characteristics and fertility and start becoming young women and men -- arrives on a different schedule for every child. At the same time, puberty is occurring earlier in general, so don’t be alarmed if you notice changes at a younger age than you experienced. Typically, puberty starts in boys between ten and sixteen. Yes, girls start earlier, which is why they’re often uncomfortably taller than boys in junior high. Puberty can last a few years or several, so don’t expect this ride to be short.

    From The Smart Parent's Guide: Getting Your Kids Through Checkups, Illnesses, and Accidents by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

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    2 036 01-1 whats happening to nations girls

    One in seven girls today shows signs of puberty before their teens, according to one study. Learn more about this disturbing trend in this video as Dr. Oz talks with Drs. Jennifer Ashton and Louise Greenspan about an epidemic of preteen girls who reach puberty early.

     

     

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    Here's what you can expect to see in your child during puberty:

    School Age: Puberty signs may begin in girls as seven or eight including public or underarm hair development, and acne.

    Preteen: Feel physically and emotionally awkward with puberty.

    Girls: onset of menstruation and breast development

    Boys: puberty begins around age nine later than girls, with a sudden growth “spurt” or more “mature” body odor, enlargement of testes or penis as well as deepening voice, facial hair development.