Puberty

Puberty

Puberty affects children between the ages of 11 and 14. The changes can be drastic and all at once, changing your physical growth, cognitive development, emotional and social skills, as well as sensory and motor development. Rapid changes often occur earlier in girl than in boys but both genders will go through physical and emotional changes that segue childhood into adulthood. If often is a difficult time of transition for the adolescent as well as the parents, but strong family support will reaffirm your childs sense of self.

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    Limiting chemical exposure and eating organic food are just two ways you can keep a young girl healthy. Find out ways to keep girls from hitting puberty early as Drs. Oz, Jennifer Ashton, and Louise Greenspan explain in this video.


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    Puberty typically lasts for several years, but the duration varies from individual to individual. Most boys go through puberty from ages 12 to 16, and most girls go through puberty from ages 10 to 14. The time it takes for adolescents to reach certain milestones, such as menstruation and facial hair growth, also varies.

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    Children are entering puberty these days as early as 7 and 8 years old. This could lead to health problems down the road. Learn about the shocking early age of puberty in this video of Dr. Oz, Dr. Corey Hebert, Dr. Donnica Moore, and Dr. Janet Taylor.



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    Puberty begins when luteinizing hormone (LH) is produced in the pituitary gland and released in pulses, especially at night. This takes place approximately three years prior to the physical development of secondary sex characteristics, such as hair, breast, and penis growth. LH interacts with other hormones such as testosterone and estrogen to cause the development of these secondary sex characteristics.

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    Puberty is a time of physical, social and emotional change for young adolescents; it is often full of awkwardness as well. Make sure that you are educated about the process and talk with your child about accurate and inaccurate ideas about puberty.

    Girls may share concerns about uneven breast development. Often this is normal and their breasts will even out as they continue to grow, but you can always discuss the issue with your doctor. Your daughter may develop cramps related to menstruation; these can be treated with medication if they become severe.

    Boys may also experience short-term breast development called gynecomastia. Most of the time this is nothing to worry about, but be sure to consult with your doctor if you think there are complications.

    Your child may also begin to develop acne. If acne is painful or severe, talk with your doctor a dermatologist.

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    Puberty is a time of physical, social, and cognitive development for adolescents, and it is likely that your child's behavior will change. Your child is likely to become more aware of their body, which may cause them to feel insecure. Peer approval will become increasingly important and may be related to physical development.

    Males may exhibit aggressive behavior related to increased hormone levels or develop a sex drive. Females may become insecure about late development or begin interacting with older social groups if they develop early. The rate at which your child develops physically in relation to their peers can significantly affect their behavior.

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    Puberty is a common and natural part of the human developmental process. Normally, children go through puberty between the ages of 10 and 14 for girls and 12 and 16 for boys. If your child does not begin to exhibit physical signs of puberty by age 16 for boys and 14 for girls, contact your health care provider.

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    Puberty is a time of change and development and can be awkward and embarrassing for adolescents. Take time to explain the physical changes to your child. Males will experience penis growth, increased hair growth and nighttime ejaculations. They may need to begin using razors to shave. Girls will encounter breast development, hair growth, and menstruation.

    Increased hormone levels may cause acne and body odor. Instruct your child on the uses of deodorant and personal hygiene. Young girls may need to begin wearing bras and using feminine products during their menstrual period. Most schools provide sexual education programs, but parents should also monitor and talk with their children about puberty.

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    Whether you realize it or not, you have the tools to talk to your child about puberty. After all, though it might have been a long time ago, you went through puberty, too!Begin by letting your child know that her body will be going through changes as she experiences puberty. Ideally, you will want to bring puberty up casually rather than having a formal discussion. You can use teachable moments such as a recent growth spurt, crush, voice change, or the sudden need for deodorant, pimple medication, or shaving cream as a starting point. Then, share your experiences with puberty, who you felt comfortable talking with, how you felt as your body changed, what you wish you knew that no one told you, and more.It is important to emphasize that everybody experiences these changes at their own pace. Find out what your child is learning in school, what she knows, and what she might fear or need more information about. It is also a good time for you to brush up on the facts. You can prep beforehand, or research topics together. Most of all, let your child know that you are a trusted and comfortable source for her sexuality (and other) questions and concerns.
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    Most girls do not show signs of puberty until they are at least 8 years old, but being overweight could start the process a little earlier. We think that what happens when you get heavy, the fat comes alive and it actually takes the hormones in your body and starts converting them to estrogen, which is what actually starts the puberty process. The other thing that happens is you get more insulin. Most folks don't realize what insulin does besides the fact it controls blood sugar. Insulin is an anabolic hormone. It builds you.

    Although other environmental factors could contribute to early puberty, being overweight is the most common cause. The first thing I'd start out with is tell her to go outside and play. We can talk about foods and all those things, but the number one thing that little kids need to be able to do is go outside and do the things that historically humans have always done, which is expend energy by playing and having a good time.


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com