Professional Beauty Treatments

Professional Beauty Treatments

Professional Beauty Treatments
Certain anti-aging beauty treatments -- think Botox, chemical peels, dermal fillers and laser resurfacing -- call for professionals. Dermatologists and plastic surgeons can offer these services, as well as medical spas. Before any treatment, get the facts on who will serve you and what the process involves. Learn more about professional beauty treatments with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    When you use cosmetics for growing eyelashes and you paint liquid on the eyelid margin where the eyelashes grow, some of the chemical inevitably gets in your eye. If the material is contaminated with bacteria or toxins, your eyes could be injured and your vision could suffer.
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    An eyelash-growing drug called bimatoprost (Latisse) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Latisse is a type of drug called a prostaglandin. It is safe and effective. Over 80% of people who coat the base of their eyelashes with Latisse grow longer and thicker eyelashes. But it is a real drug and all drugs have side effects -- some people develop swelling of their eyelids and redness of their eyes and have to stop using it.
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    There are many causes of eyelash loss including infection, autoimmune disorders, thyroid trouble, trauma, and even cancer. Thinning of lashes can also happen with age. I would suggest you see your ophthalmologist or eye doctor. This person could ask you some questions and examine you thoroughly to understand the reason for your eyelash problem. Once your doctor knows the problem, you can begin treatment accordingly. Latisse is the only FDA-approved treatment proven to grow longer, darker, and thicker lashes. It takes two to four months to see any effects, and side effects can include darkening of surrounding skin and even the iris or colored part of your eye. You can talk more with your eye doctor whether this treatment is right for you.
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    Latisse™ is a product that is made by the same company that makes Botox Cosmetic™.  The active ingredient in Latisse™, bimatoprost, is actually a medication that was originally used to treat glaucoma.  Patients who were using the bimatoprost eye drops started reporting that their lashes were longer. As a result of these patient reports, the product was reformulated and tested for use as an eyelash enhancer.  The FDA approved Latisse recently and it is available by prescription only.

     

    Nightly application of Latisse™ to the lash-line has been proven to enhance the length, caliber and pigmentation of eyelashes within weeks. The results are gradual and continued use is necessary to maintain the benefits. The product is generally well tolerated although some patients in the studies experienced itching and redness of the eyes. Latisse™ may increase the brown pigmentation of the colored part of the eye, which can be permanent.

     

     If you are using Latisse™ you need to let your ophthalmologist know since this medication can affect intraocular pressure.  Latisse™ should not be used without physician supervision in anyone who has eye pressure problems.  Latisse™ is available by prescription and may be available for purchase in your physician’s office.

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    The only FDA-approved product that is proven to grow lashes is Latisse.  If lashes growth is very important to you then you might consider this.  However, you should have a baseline ophthalmologic examination to make sure you do not have reasons for not using it such as reaction to the product, or other conditions.  Note that after PRK your eye pressure readings may be artificially measured as low.  Latisse can also do this.  Therefore an abnormally high pressure in your eyes can be easily missed if not watched closely.  Latisse may have some other side effects such as some dark discoloration of the eyelid skin over time.  I can only recommend Latisse if you are willing to be carefully monitored periodically by an Eye M.D.

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    There is a new prescription drug, LATISSE (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) 0.03% by Allergan, which was recently approved by the FDA as safe and effective to help lengthen, thicken, and darken eyelashes. It has the same active ingredient, a prostaglandin analog, as a glaucoma drug, Lumigan (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) 0.03%, also made by Allergan. It was discovered that one of the side effects of Lumigan is increased eyelash length, darkening, and thickening. Other side effects include eye redness, irritation, and darkening of the skin of the eyelids, all of which are reversible upon cessation of drug. Darkening of the iris has also been reported, and this side effect is not reversible.

    The FDA studies show that the most common adverse events (about 3% to 4% incidence) are itchiness of eyes, redness of eyes, and increased pigmentation. If you have an eye condition, such as glaucoma, macular edema, or eye inflammation, consult with your ophthalmologist or eye doctor before using LATISSE.

    Closely follow the instructions for use of the drug. If you have any concerns, the easiest thing to do is to see your ophthalmologist who can evaluate you to make sure you are a good candidate for LATISSE as well as prescribe it.
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    Latisse is a prescription drug for growing eyelashes, it is expensive and requires a visit to your doctor. That has prompted a bunch of cosmetics companies to make competing products that also claim to grow eyelashes. These different cosmetics contain chemicals like prostaglandins, vitamins, and other things that claim to make your eyelashes grow. I'm not sure if these products really work, because as cosmetics, their manufacturers don't have to prove they work or submit any data to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    I prefer to remove brown marks on the face, arms, or hands with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel. If that is unsuccessful, I use the laser. The laser heats up the brown pigment and fries the cells that make the pigment, leaving a blister. After healing, there is a light red spot that gradually fades. In the end, the brown mark is gone.

    While the laser can remove brown marks, I believe it is overkill. I reserve its use for very difficult brown spots. The most popular lasers used to treat brown pigment have names like ruby, alexandrite, neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG), and pigmented lesion dye laser (PLDL). Again, these different lasers use different types of light to destroy the brown pigment.
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    The lasers that treat brown spots are also some of the lasers that treat tattoos. Because they significantly heat the pigment in the skin, they usually cause blistering. Healing takes five to eight days and often leaves a reddened area that can result in a white area. Scarring and permanent pigmentation changes are possible.
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    A answered
    An intense pulsed light (photorejuvenation), pulses of nonlaser light of varying wave lengths target pigmented skin cells beneath the top layer of skin.

    What it's best for: Superficial areas of irregular pigmentation, freckles, sun spots, and acne.

    Average cost: $300-$600 per treatment.

    Number of treatments: Four to six sessions at least three weeks apart.

    Risks and recovery time:
    • Redness and swelling occur immediately after treatment.
    • Pigment problems, like sun spots and freckles, will become quite dark before disappearing, usually within a week.

    Inside scoop: Topical anesthetic minimizes discomfort of hot, snapping sensation caused by light pulses.