Prevention Of Bacterial Infection

Prevention Of Bacterial Infection

Prevention Of Bacterial Infection
There are many steps you can take to help prevent infection from bacteria. Practice good hygiene, such as frequent hand washing. Fortify your immune system with healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables. Avoid close contact with people who are sick with a contagious infection from bacteria. And only take antibiotics when needed to avoid developing resistance to antibiotics in the future.

Recently Answered

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    A , Dentist, answered
    No!! Band wind musical instruments cannot be sterilized with disinfectant fluids from the music store. Sterilization is the complete killing of all microbes: bacteria, yeasts, molds, viruses, and their spores. Ethylene oxide has been found to be the only way to sterilize the instrument without hurting its parts. Disinfection is a reduction in the numbers of microbes; however, it may not be sufficient to reduce the numbers of germs to prevent disease transmission.

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    Typhoid fever can be prevented by planning ahead. If you're planning on traveling to a country where typhoid fever is an issue, getting a vaccine may be a good idea. Vaccines can be taken by mouth or injection, and they usually protect you from infection for at least two years. When traveling in countries where typhoid is a problem, make sure you wash your hands a lot. Don't drink any water that's not bottled or purified, including the water used in ice cubes and in brushing your teeth. Also, try not to eat raw fruits and vegetables-instead, choose foods that are served extremely hot since any bacteria will likely have been killed.

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    There are a handful of ways you can prevent yourself from getting bacterial infections, most of which apply to secondary bacterial infections as well. The first is simply washing your hands. Since most infections come from contact, keeping your hands germ-free will help keep them from entering your body. Vaccinations are also crucial in preventing bacterial infections, especially in children. If you do find you have a virus, stay home and rest. Contact with other people is an easy way to pick up bacteria, so avoiding them will certainly help. Finally, do not travel when you are ill - with so many people confined in a small space on a plane, it is easy to pick up a secondary infection.

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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Dr. Leigh Vinocur - How can I avoid getting sick from bacteria in swimming pools and seawater?

    To keep from getting sick from bacteria while swimming -- first, don't drink the water! says emergency medicine specialist Dr. Leigh Vinocur. Watch the video to learn more about staying healthy around water.


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    An essential part of preventing the spread of infection in the community and at home is proper hygiene. This includes hand-washing and cleaning shared items and surfaces. Antibacterial-containing products have not been proven to prevent the spread of infection better than products that do not contain antibacterial chemicals.

    Although a link between antibacterial chemicals used in personal cleaning products and bacterial resistance has been shown in vitro studies (in a controlled environment), no human health consequence has been demonstrated. More studies examining resistance issues related to these products are needed.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
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    Dysentery can be prevented by limiting exposure to the bacteria that often cause the disease. The best way to limit exposure is to drink, bathe, and swim in only clean, uninfected water. Using good hygiene can also help prevent dysentery. People with dysentery should wash their hands well with soap, particularly after using the bathroom, to prevent the spread of infection.

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    Central line-associated bloodstream infections used to be considered by many healthcare professions an unfortunate yet inevitable consequence of an extended hospital stay. However, recent research has shown this isn’t the case. In fact, Hopkins researchers led a study at Johns Hopkins Hospital and throughout hospitals in Michigan which showed that central line infections can be virtually eliminated using a simple checklist. The checklist includes interventions included procedures such as hand washing, using protective clothing during insertion and removing unnecessary catheters. Using the checklist and other methods has resulted in less opportunity for contamination.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Before you grab a handful of walnuts and the remote to turn on the TV, take a look at the keypad. How many people in your house touched the remote today? Unless everyone washes his or her hands each and every time they touch it, the remote is a breeding ground for germs. Take a not-too-moist disinfecting cleaning cloth to all remotes and phones. Ask everyone to wash their hands or use alcohol-based sanitizers before (and after) touching them.

    Take a look around at all the electronic devices you touch over the course of the day. You may be the only one touching your computer keypad but that doesn't mean it isn't riddled with germs. Each time you shut down, take a cleaning cloth to the keyboard and mouse. If you are willing to make the investment, there are UV disinfecting wands available.


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Luckily, there are a few simple steps you can take to reduce your exposure to bacteria during flying and minimize your chance of being sick on your trip.

    • Practice good hand hygiene. Pack an alcohol-based hand sanitizer in your carry-on and use it early and often (after getting seated, before and after eating and drinking, and when you return from the restroom.) This step alone will reduce your chance of getting sick by 50%. 
    • Wipe your worries away. Bring along sanitizing wipes and clean your tray (which can harbor the dangerous MRSA bacteria) and handrails.
    • Be wary of the bathroom. Airplane bathrooms are some of the germiest places around. Wash your hands afterward, use a paper towel to open the door when you leave, and then slap on hand sanitizer when you're back in your seat.  
    • Arm your immune system. North American ginseng is a promising botanical product used to ward off flu. Populations that take it appear to have a lower incidence of viral spread. Try to be well rested and have any chronic conditions well under control before you travel. 
    • Aim the air. Make a fist with your hand and place it directly over your chest, then aim the air vent to blow onto it. That will give you the best airflow to protect you from being exposed to an infection.  
    • Stay hydrated. Drinking lots of water will not only help your membranes to stay moisturized, but it will help keep you from developing potentially fatal blood clots in your legs, which crop up because staying immobile in a tiny space slows circulation. Also get up and walk the aisle once an hour.  

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Dentist, answered
    Yes, there is a method of sterilizing your child's band wind musical instrument. The process uses ethylene oxide, a compound used in hospital operating rooms to rapidly sterilize dropped surgical instruments. This compound does not hurt the instrument. Such sterilization should be employed when the instrument is passed from one child to another.