Prevention Of Bacterial Infection

Prevention Of Bacterial Infection

Prevention Of Bacterial Infection
There are many steps you can take to help prevent infection from bacteria. Practice good hygiene, such as frequent hand washing. Fortify your immune system with healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables. Avoid close contact with people who are sick with a contagious infection from bacteria. And only take antibiotics when needed to avoid developing resistance to antibiotics in the future.

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    There are a handful of ways you can prevent yourself from getting bacterial infections, most of which apply to secondary bacterial infections as well. The first is simply washing your hands. Since most infections come from contact, keeping your hands germ-free will help keep them from entering your body. Vaccinations are also crucial in preventing bacterial infections, especially in children. If you do find you have a virus, stay home and rest. Contact with other people is an easy way to pick up bacteria, so avoiding them will certainly help. Finally, do not travel when you are ill - with so many people confined in a small space on a plane, it is easy to pick up a secondary infection.

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    A , Dentist, answered
    No!! Band wind musical instruments cannot be sterilized with disinfectant fluids from the music store. Sterilization is the complete killing of all microbes: bacteria, yeasts, molds, viruses, and their spores. Ethylene oxide has been found to be the only way to sterilize the instrument without hurting its parts. Disinfection is a reduction in the numbers of microbes; however, it may not be sufficient to reduce the numbers of germs to prevent disease transmission.

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    If your baby gets formula, choose infant formula sold in liquid form, especially when your baby is a newborn or very young. Liquid formulations of infant formula are made to be sterile and should not transmit Cronobacter or other infections if handled properly after opening.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
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    Typhoid fever can be prevented by planning ahead. If you're planning on traveling to a country where typhoid fever is an issue, getting a vaccine may be a good idea. Vaccines can be taken by mouth or injection, and they usually protect you from infection for at least two years. When traveling in countries where typhoid is a problem, make sure you wash your hands a lot. Don't drink any water that's not bottled or purified, including the water used in ice cubes and in brushing your teeth. Also, try not to eat raw fruits and vegetables-instead, choose foods that are served extremely hot since any bacteria will likely have been killed.

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    A , Herbal Medicine, answered

    Drum roll, please… The germiest item in your household is… ironically…the item used to keep things clean. You guessed it, kitchen sponges and dishrags. NSF International (an independent public health organization) conducted a study and discovered that the kitchen sponge was by far, the germiest!  Believe it or not it harbored 150 times more bacteria, mold and yeast than a toothbrush holder. 77 percent harbored coliform bacteria, and another 86 percent contained yeast and mold. Even scarier, 18 percent contained staph bacteria staph germs like those that can cause dangerous MRSA infections (yikes!!!). Some of other germs that were found on a kitchen sponge were Salmonella and E.coli which could make you sick however, the good news is that most of the “stuff” found living and breeding in your kitchen sponge will not. (whew!)

    3 CAAL Sponge Cleaning Tip: Microwave your wet sponges once a day for two minutes, and replace it every two weeks. If you use a rag, toss it in a hot washing cycle every day or two.

    Are you ready for the Top 10 germiest items in your home? Here we go:

    1. Cutting Boards
    2. Stove Knobs
    3. Kitchen Counters
    4. Pet Toys
    5. Faucet Handles
    6. Coffee Makers
    7. Pet Bowls
    8. Toothbrush Holders
    9. Kitchen Sink
    10. Kitchen Sponge/Rags
    See All 2 Answers
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    There is no way to 100% guarantee that you won't get erysipelas, but there are things you can do to reduce your risk. Since the infection enters through skin lesions and foot fungus, try to avoid cuts and take good care of your feet. If you do get a cut, keep it clean and practice good hygiene.

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    Using antibiotics to prevent a bacterial infection only contributes to antibiotic resistance. That same antibiotic may not work the next time it's needed -- and if you get an infection, it can be much more difficult to treat. It's best to wait and use antibiotics only if a bacterial infection is confirmed.
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    Infection control is the key to stopping methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) -- a staph infection that is resistant to several common antibiotics -- in health care settings. To protect dental patients like yourself, dental health care workers follow strict infection control practices as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The American Dental Association (ADA) urges all dentists, dental auxiliaries and dental laboratories to employ appropriate infection control procedures, and to keep up-to-date as scientific information leads to improvements in infection control, risk assessment and disease management in oral health care.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Dr. Leigh Vinocur - How can I avoid getting sick from bacteria in swimming pools and seawater?

    To keep from getting sick from bacteria while swimming -- first, don't drink the water! says emergency medicine specialist Dr. Leigh Vinocur. Watch the video to learn more about staying healthy around water.


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    An essential part of preventing the spread of infection in the community and at home is proper hygiene. This includes hand-washing and cleaning shared items and surfaces. Antibacterial-containing products have not been proven to prevent the spread of infection better than products that do not contain antibacterial chemicals.

    Although a link between antibacterial chemicals used in personal cleaning products and bacterial resistance has been shown in vitro studies (in a controlled environment), no human health consequence has been demonstrated. More studies examining resistance issues related to these products are needed.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.